Total System Maintenance

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Halcyon, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. Halcyon macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    #1
    Is it really necessary to run software like DiskWarrior or TechTool Pro to achieve total system maintenance? What will they do apart from, or better than, what the built in functions in OSX do? By "built in functions" I'm referring to the scheduled maintenance that the system performs during late night hours, if you leave your computer on.

    I'm thinking more in terms of OS10.4.9 on Intel Mac's, but I guess this can apply to all OSX's, either PPC or Intel.

    TIA
     
  2. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #2
    I'll toss in a no. I've never used either with no apparent ill ramifications....
     
  3. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #3
    Apple includes DiskWarrior with AppleCare. However, it is used only in the case of catastrophic failure.

    For my first year or so of running MacOS X, I had Norton SystemWorks installed. I will not claim that it damaged my system because it did not. However, it did nothing of benefit either. When Symantec dropped it, I did not look back. I have not looked for a replacement secure in knowledge that none was needed--and none is needed.

    Several years ago, I fixed a minor problem on my machine by running fsck in Single-User Mode. This was before journaling was added to HFS+. With HFS+ Journaled, fsck, and Disk Utility > Disk First Aid, you are pretty much set. I also strongly recommend buying AppleCare as protection against hardware failure.
     
  4. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #4
    Here's what you do, nothing. Just sit back and do nothing. Use your computer as you wish.

    Come back when there is a problem. It's that easy on Mac!
     
  5. spork183 macrumors 6502a

    spork183

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    #5
    If you're concerned, you can run the daily/weekly/monthly maintenance routines from terminal. Other than that, sit back and relax.
     
  6. Halcyon thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    #6
    No concern on this end...but just like insurance -it's better to have it and not need it rather than need it and don't have it- I was just curious what is best at prevention.

    If the automatic maintenance performed by OSX is enough, so be it...i'm happy with that. If these mentioned software companies have developed a product that go a little bit further in preventing any type of mishaps, why not use them?

    Everyday lots of people post messages soliciting help for certain oddities they encounter while working, playing, etc. with their computers...I wonder how many of these could be avoided if there is a piece of software out there that does a better job of Total System Maintenance than the system itself does.

    Just curious...but that's what makes my life enlightening :)
     
  7. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #7
    There's honestly nothing that you can do for prevention.

    Explanation of OS X maintenance scripts
     
  8. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #8
    Agreed... there are things in operating systems that are the equivalent, in some sense, of "wear" parts in a car (like the oil, the brake rotors, etc). These are things like the fragmentation of memory and hard drive space. But operating systems take care of this for themselves, now. So for instance, unless you do certain kinds of very large file manipulation (like in pro video editing), you no longer need to do defragmentation, which used to be a maintenance chore.

    When it comes to things like DiskWarrior, that look at the logical integrity of the drive, you can very quickly see if the logical structure has integrity or not (i.e. by running verify disk in Disk Utility, or running fsck, on which it is based). So like Eidorian said, there is nothing "preventative" about running disk repair tools on a disk that is not damaged to begin with.
     
  9. Halcyon thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    #9
    This has all been very enlightening and I appeciate everybody's input.

    Seems that AppleJack is a nifty and useful must-have piece of software.

    DiskWarrior or TechTool Pro (either one) is also a good investment...if catastrophic failure should ever occur.

    Otherwise, I'll just sit down and enjoy my Mac.
     
  10. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #10
    Eh, don't fix it if it ain't broke. I'm wary of system maintenance utilities. No reason to run them unless there is a problem.
     

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