Touch ID for MBA/MBP?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Anti-Lucifer, Sep 27, 2014.

  1. Anti-Lucifer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    #1
    Anyone think the next revision to the MBA/MBP's will have touchID built in? Perhaps it would be a great idea as a login authentication and can be used to authenticate a bunch of stuff such as website logins, purchasing online, etc.

    I have a work Thinkpad here with a fingerprint sensor. I'm not fond of it at all because it works but it's just not as elegant and easy to use like apple's TouchID.
     
  2. blooperz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2013
    #2
    I know with the lenovo's one of my friends was able to login using his fingerprints if he tried enough times. It's not really a secure method of authentication, but I guess if it's a home computer and you're not worried about that sort of thing then it could be handy.
     
  3. SCOLANATOR macrumors 6502a

    SCOLANATOR

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    Jul 3, 2013
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    Can't see it happening, not yet anyway. Although I think it would be cool, I really like TouchID on my iPhone but the difference between that and my Mac is I unlock my iPhone dozens of times each day, with my Mac its maybe twice.
     
  4. konradsa macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    #4
    MY X61 Thinkpad has a fingerprint scanner. Pretty useless gimmick, never even used it more than once. Maybe Apple will make it more convenient to use TouchID on the MacBooks, but to me that's not a must have feature.
     
  5. MacInTO macrumors 65816

    MacInTO

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    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Canada, eh!
    #5
    What's the point?

    On a computer, there is a keyboard and password for that.

    Maybe an iris scan instead? :cool:
     
  6. iKrivetko macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    #6
    I'd love to see one as well. They probably could integrate it into the trackpad at some point. Although I'm curious about how they will deal with the secure enclave thing, as it is integrated into their chips, but they have no control over Intel's design.
     
  7. ABC5S macrumors 68040

    ABC5S

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Location:
    Florida
    #7
    Just move the keyboard down a tiny bit touching the track pad and enlarge the power button to accommodate the Touch ID. Looks as if it would work. I would like one as well. I log on off a few times a day.
     
  8. Crzyrio macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2010
    #8
    A 2nd A8 cpu for smaller task along like browsing the internet with the secure enclave for Touch ID ;)

    Thats what I see in the future, some kind of side boot version of iOS for basic computing to save battery life. When required the rest of the things kick in.

    But to be more on topic, I most definitely don't see it coming anytime soon. I am guessing 2-3 years.
     
  9. geoff5093 macrumors 68000

    geoff5093

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    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Dover, NH
    #9
    Integrate it into the trackpad, or move the power button back to the top right and make the eject button a dedicated TouchID area.
     
  10. FrozenDarkness macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    #10
    i'd love to see apple move towards facial recognition, tbh.
     
  11. 5to1, Sep 29, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2014

    5to1 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    #11
    To be honest a password is rarely that secure either and actually a combination of authentication methods based on the circumstances would be better for both business and home.

    I've had a work Thinkpad with fingerprint sensor and would happily have used it in many situations over a password, despite the flaw you describe.

    Its obviously not ideal that someone could repeatedly swipe the sensor and it would occasionally let them in by mistake (although I believe the TouchID sensor is more accurate/secure). However, when working in a busy office/site someone could quite easily overlook your password entry if they had nefarious intentions.

    Given a choice between the two, I'd often feel more secure knowing it would take someone lots of repeated failed attempts in a busy office/site to gain entry. As that would likely draw more suspicion then someone managing to spy my password and then entering it to gain immediate entry.

    The problem is people rarely change their password (and even if forced by policy just use simple to guess iterations), or take much care when entering their password. Even if you are particularly careful to obscure password entry, it can offend those around you. That can be a little bit tricky when its a client in particular.

    The biggest problem I had with previous solutions was how unreliable they were at letting the right person in (i.e. detecting my fingerprint correctly), rather then letting the wrong person in :D

    TouchID on the other hand has been great and I'm happily using it for a year now (and thats on a phone, where auth is done far more often). I'd happily ditch my current laptop, taking a significant hit in depreciation and jump in a new machine with TouchID.

    Especially since Apple appear to be implementing TouchID in the correct way (the way it would work best for me :D). Password is needed on boot up, too many failed attempts and password is required, they are looking like integrating it into general password control.

    Implemented in the same way on a laptop could definitely improve security for most people IMO:

    - For transport and longer absences from the machine shut it down (or suspend to non touchID mode) so a password is required.
    - For short absences and repeated <suspend/resume/auth> cycles use touchID, keeping your password safe from prying eyes and encouraging you to choose a longer password as you don't need to enter it so many times.
    - Provides a middle ground for storing passwords for auto entry. Some could be auto entered (the ones I don't really care about so much), some could require TouchID (the ones I want to be secure, but also want some convenience) and some are not saved at all as security is critical.

    I hope they get around to adding it sooner rather then later :)
     

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