Trackpad on Windows

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by aerodoc, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. aerodoc macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    #1
    I am thinking about getting a MBP, but I only want to use Win7. One question might be, what is the point of that?

    After looking at several laptop PC's, the trackpads just don't seem very good. This is probably my highest priority in a laptop and the MBP trackpad seems great. But I can't really demo it in windows and have heard it may not be as great there (i.e. misses clicks, not as smooth, that kind of thing). Also, are some of the things like "right click", etc. more of a pain than a standard windows trackpad?

    I realize a lot of this might be personal preference, but would like to hear some opinions.
     
  2. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #2
    Trackpad works all right though I don't know if all the gestures are supported. Everything is great if you have tap to click enabled.

    If you want to take it for a semi-spin you can get the Magic Trackpad to see if you like it.
     
  3. rgarjr macrumors 603

    rgarjr

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    #3
    mac trackpads suck in Windows. They work awesome in OSX but in Windows is a different story. Get a mouse.
     
  4. KirkL macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Location:
    United States
    #4
    I've tried a Dell's and a ThinkPad's trackpad and I have to admit the MBP's completely blow theirs away. The scrolling etc is INCREDIBLY SMOOTH! Plus the Trackpad feels really great!

    Right click can be accomplished by clicking with two fingers. You can also set up the right side (or the left side) of the trackpad as a "Right Click Zone" - Clicks made in these areas will be registered as Right Clicks.

    If you want to get a MBP just to run W7, don't bother. It's supposed to perform worse under BootCamp. Actually, at least give OS X a try for a week or so. It has a really tiny learning curve.
     
  5. ljx718 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    #5
    i'll admit that the track pad is one of my favorite thing about my macbook pro, but its not worth buying one just for the trackpad and not using osx. i dont know if you have any friends with boot camp, but ive never had any problems. give osx a chance. once i started managing windows with 4 finger swipes, i cant go back.

    also, idk if it works, but try out a magic track pad
     
  6. aerodoc thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    #6
    Windows is a must since Excel macros don't work in OSX.

    So...a funny thing. I tried on my friend's macbook and when running parallel, the right click worked just fine in Excel, Word, etc.

    However, if it was boot directly into windows, the right click would not work in Excel and Word (though it would work in Powerpoint and other apps). Very strange.

    I am still considering it though since like I said, the trackpad interface is the #1 priority to me. Everything else is secondary, so try to keep that in mind.
     
  7. bhattsan macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    #7
    Yeah to put it bluntly, Apple invested no time in creating trackpad drivers for windows. The only gesture they support in boot camp is two finger scrolling and even that is a very poor implementation on their part (very jittery and inconsistent, unlike in OSX). However, the scrolling through fusion is beautiful and most of my Windows usage is through fusion (reboot once in a while for games). You are better of getting fusion if you want a usable trackpad in windows.
     
  8. aerodoc thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    #8
    Wouldn't that have a pretty bad affect on performance though? I suppose that may be the trade you have to consider.
     
  9. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #9
    If all you are doing is excel...there is absolutely nothing to worry about.
     
  10. aerodoc thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    #10
    Well, it depends on what you are doing with Excel. I am developing professional grade software with a lot of VBA programming. From a memory point of view it should be OK, but the processing can be slow. I suppose memory is the bigger issue when running both though?

    Besides that, it seemed performance was laggy on my friend's when running both. I suppose not enough to make a final decision, but kind of irritating. Either way, you are going to a take a hit by running in parallel I am pretty sure.
     

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