transfer SSD via 2006 MacBook?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Four oF NINE, Jul 6, 2014.

  1. Four oF NINE macrumors 68000

    Four oF NINE

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Location:
    Hell's Kitchen
    #1
    Hey guys, I need some help. I spilled a cup that had maybe a swallow or two of coffee into it and fried my MBP. My research indicates it's probably fried, and probably not worth spending $1000 fixing..

    So I'm going to buy a new MBP, and I'm wondering if I can use an older (late 2006) MacBook to host the SSD from the coffee spilled computer long enough to transfer date to the new MBP when I get it? would that drive be compatible in a MacBook that vintage?

    Thanks for any replies!
     
  2. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #2
    The SSD will work in the Macbook but you may have a difficult time getting the newer software to work on an older computer.
     
  3. Asuriyan macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Location:
    Indiana
    #3
    It's probably less effort to buy a USB 3.0 enclosure, put the SSD in that, and plug it into a new machine. That late 2006 machine won't boot anything later than Lion, so a direct hard drive swap probably won't work.
     
  4. Four oF NINE thread starter macrumors 68000

    Four oF NINE

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Location:
    Hell's Kitchen
    #4
    Update:

    The MacBook appears to be working normally now, but I'm wondering if I did any long term damage.
     
  5. alex0002 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2013
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #5
    Make sure you are making regular backups with Time Machine or some other method, while you still have access to all your data. It might be good to ensure you have installation media or download Mavericks and make the USB installer.

    Or have some other way of installing OS X and recovering your data. You might also consider your plan for your MacBook replacement when the old one finally dies. That could happen soon, or you might have another 2-3 years of problem free computing. No one can say for sure.

    Yes, the old disk might work in a USB enclosure, but that shouldn't be a substitute for making proper backups and having a recovery plan.
     

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