Transfer

Discussion in 'iMac' started by zutty53, Apr 10, 2014.

  1. zutty53, Apr 10, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014

    zutty53 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    #1
    I'm expecting my new iMac soon and was wondering what the best way to transfer all my files and programs and prefs from my mid-2009 24" machine. I know there are several ways and was just wondering what people have done when they got new machines. I also have 6 external hard drives (1-USB 2.0 & 2-Firewire 800 & 3-USB 3.0 capable) and was wondering if this complicates matters. I'm running Mavericks and have the thunderbolt to Firewire adapter ready and also a USB 3.0 hub. I also wondered if any of my devices (also a USB printer and 2 external Optical drives cannot be used on a hub. I sure wish there were more USB ports! ALSO I was wondering if the mini-display to HDMI adapter I was using can be used as a Thunderbolt to HDMI adapter to hook up a second monitor.
    Thanks All!!
     
  2. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #2
    My strategy has always been to simply transfer important documents, movies, pictures and my iTunes library over to a new machine by backing up the old machine on an external drive and then using the external drive to select the folders and files that I want to put into the new machine. Yes, it takes longer to do things this way, but with iCloud synchronizing contacts, bookmarks, etc., that greatly improves things, so that in the end it's just a matter of putting in email accounts, tweaking settings to one's liking and then putting in software. When most of one's software is available at Apple's Mac App store, that's not much of a hassle at all. Other stuff is usually readily available online. By doing things this way you're starting out your new computer really fresh and clean, not cluttering it up with a bunch of old stuff from an old machine.
     
  3. zutty53, Apr 10, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014

    zutty53 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    #3
    I see your point, but wouldn't that mean I'd have to re-install all my software if I don't transfer all my prefs etc.? I'm also a back-up freak and have multiple back-ups like time machine and 2 mirror back ups of my entire drive via Super Duper!
    Thanks!
     
  4. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #4
    Everyone is different, of course -- depends upon what software you have and how extensively you've done work in it which results in files to keep within it. Prior to the last time I went through this process, I looked at my applications on my iMac and decided which I wanted to go ahead and put on my new MBP. Most were Apple Apps purchased through the Mac App store, so easy enough to simply download them into the new machine at no extra cost. Most of my other software programs were either free and easy to download again into the new machine or were ones I was no longer using so didn't need to bother with at all.

    I also need to clarify here: I actually handle doing backups manually -- instead of using Time Machine or SuperDuper, I plug in the external drive and then copy over the various folders from the source machine to the external drive -- that is: documents folder, pictures folder, movies folder, music folder, etc., etc...... I just find this a much easier way to work when I want or need to retrieve something from backup. This has worked well for me for years and I see no reason to make life more complicated!

    Yes, by setting up a new machine in this way you do have to take the time to go through System Preferences and set up the machine to your liking, need to tweak viewing preferences and the like, etc., but in the long run I find this useful because while I'm doing all of this I'm also exploring and becoming acquainted with my new machine and if there are going to be any problems I am likely to spot them early on (hopefully before I've put all of my personal stuff into it). Kind of a "bonding experience" between me and the new machine.....LOL!

    Not long ago a friend bought a new iMac and we lugged her old iMac over to the Apple store so that she could leave it there for the store personnel to transfer all her data from old machine to new one. It took two days. When she had both machines back home, she wiped the old one clean in preparation to give to her brother and started using her new machine as if there had been no interruption, as everything on the new machine was just as the old one had been. She was thrilled. As I see it, though, the problem with this is that more than likely along with the good stuff, there was probably a bunch of old dreck that trailed along into the new machine, too, and I can't help wondering if at some point somewhere along the line that might cause problems, as she's still carrying around stuff that was on her old Windows machine and her first (PPC) iMac in addition to what was on the last iMac. Whatever.....
     
  5. zutty53 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    #5
    You make some great and valid points. I too am a hands on guy and only use Super Duper because as I understand it there are many invisible files that aren't transferred by the drag and drop method. Also I have way too many programs that I've accumulated throughout the years to even consider starting from scratch. I do appreciate your advice.
     
  6. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #6
    If you are not having any issues with your current machine, just use Migration Assistant. Make a fresh Time Machine backup to one of your USB3 drives then use that as the source for the Migration Assistant import.

    This will bring over your user account and all your data and apps with their settings. Do this at the time of system setup. Do not make an account on the iMac then try the import later as this makes a mess.

    The only issue you may have, and you will have this no matter how you migrate, is some apps, notably those from MS and Adobe, will require reactivation on the new machine.
     
  7. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #7
    Yes, as far as applications are concerned there are many hidden files which aren't going to come over via the drag-and-drop method, which is why I don't attempt to do that. All I back up are my actual files and folders -- my music, my documents, my movies, my pictures. Any software/applications I put into the new machine "fresh" for the very reason you mention.
     
  8. zutty53 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    #8
    Gotcha Clix,
    I also will try and clean up the huge amount of garbage files and programs I have in my old machine before I try and use the Migration Ass't. It would be silly to slow down a new machine with stuff that is probably already slowing down the old one. I just don't want to have to re install every program unless I really have to. My really critical ones are Lightroom 5.4, Photoshop CC, Office, Photomatix, Downsize, 1Password, Elements 10, Logic Pro x and several others.
    This forum seems to be a great resource and I thank all you kind people for your help.
    Z

    ----------

    Weasel, I currently have my Time Machine backups on a LaCie firewire 800 drive. Would it be advisable to change that and start a new one on one of my USB 3.0 drives instead?
    Thanks
    Z
     
  9. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #9
    I see you already have the TB to FW adaptor, so that would actually be faster than USB3. So yeah... if you already have a Time Machine backup on the FW drive, that will work just fine.
     
  10. zutty53 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    #10
    Thanks Weasel, That simplifies that issue. Also, does the mini display to HDMI adaptor work as a TB adaptor for use on a second display? It looks exactly the same.
     
  11. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #11
    If you mean use MDP to HDMI to HDMI in on another display, yes.... that will work. As I recall though it will be limited to 1080p vertical res.
     

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