Triathletes

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by eric/, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. eric/ Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #1
    Any experienced triathletes around here?

    I'm in pretty good shape, but definitely not triathlon shape. More like cross-fit shape. And I'm looking to start training.
     
  2. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #2
    Eric, there are a number of training plans on the web. Pick one based on the distance you want to compete in. When is your target race?

    Cross fit shape and tri shape are completely different if you are thinking of longer distances. I have not done crossfit but I am guessing from what I know of it that it's a very anaerobic sport.
     
  3. eric/ thread starter Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #3
    I actually don't have a target race at the moment. I'd like to start getting in shape though, and then move on from there. I plan on eventually competing, but I've pretty much got all the time in the world. I'm mainly concerned with beginning with a plan that isn't too easy.

    I was a decent runner and was able to run ~6 minute miles, and could pretty much run forever, able to swim, but not very good at it (Lifeguard certified, for what it's worth), and idk about biking. I have access to stationary bikes at the gym. I've been strength training for a while now, but somewhat neglected my running/swimming/biking.

    I've searched online and found a few different plans, but I'm still at the overwhelmed with information stage. :D
     
  4. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #4
    You will never win a tri in the swim so don't kill yourself over that. But what are you doing on a stationary bike? Get thee outside!!!! Lol

    Fwiw I've only done a few off road sprint tris. My sport is endurance mountain biking. But I worked in a shop for 6 years that had a huge tri base and currently work for a company that puts on many running races, dus and tris.

    Word of warning - it is an $$$$$$$ sport!!!!!!!
     
  5. eric/ thread starter Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #5
    I don't own a bike, atm. I'm hesitant on purchasing one just yet because I want to do some research and make sure that I'm committed to this.

    I don't plan on winning or anything either. It's for me.
     
  6. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #6
    Check out some bike shops your area. Look for ones that carry brands such as Blueseventy or Quintana Roo. Those are wetsuits. You want a tri shop, not a plain old bike shop. You may be able to rent a bike. You will find it's a very welcoming community. Desoto is another brand well known for its tri clothing.

    If you are into forums you should check out slowtwitch. They can be a bit brutal though so you may want to lurk for awhile. ;)

    Glad you are going into this for fun! It IS a ton of fun :)
     
  7. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #7
    Stationary biking is nowhere near road biking or tri biking. I'd suggest picking up a beater and getting outside on the hills and into the wind a bit
     
  8. eric/ thread starter Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #8
    Thanks for the advice on the bikes you guys. I guess I wasn't really thinking.
     
  9. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #9
    No problem. Not trying to discourage you. But indoor and outdoor are so different. As you know that treadmills and roads don't compare either. It's a great goal though. I'd love to do a tri some day.
     
  10. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #10
    I used a trainer three times last year. I think the last time I had been on one was back in 2006. Used to have a treadmill but the ex took it and I'm not looking to replace it. There is no substitute for being outside!!! The one thing that kills me is the wind, although I did a 1:15 feels-like-13 ride this winter cuz I just needed to get out! Last winter was tough was the record snows though.
     
  11. eric/ thread starter Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #11
    What brands would you guys suggest for bikes?
     
  12. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #12
    I don't know what the "brand of the moment" is. Litespeed, QR used to be big names. Now just about everyone makes a tri bike. Cannondale, Cervelo, Look ($$$), Guro, Kuota (probably spelled that wrong, but it made a big splash awhile back). Litespeed and QR are still big. Even the "mainstream" brands such as Trek etc will have tri bikes. Most important thing is to be fitted though.

    Somewhere someone publishes a list of how many athletes competed on which brands in Kona. It's huge for the bike manufactorers to be up on that list.
     
  13. Angelo95210 macrumors 6502a

    Angelo95210

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2009
    Location:
    Paris, France
    #13
    What do 'tri' bikes have specific? I am interested in this thread as I would like to do a tri one day. First I want to do a marathon in the next two years. At this stage I am just experienced with half-marathons.
     
  14. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #14

    A tri bike is more aerodynamic itself, and will more comfortably keep you in a more aero position for an extended period of time. I have still seen people PR in Ironman distances using a road bike, so like anything else, much of that is dependent on the engine (athlete). You can also add aero bars to a road bike, but it's not quite the same.
     
  15. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #15
    Can't offer too much advice on the triathlon thing.

    However, when you are ready for some advanced, professional advice regarding marathon couch lying, feel free to PM me.:cool: ;)

    Good luck in your training. I hope you meet whatever goals you set for yourself. You are a far better man than I...:D
     
  16. eric/ thread starter Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #16
    Hmm. I think best thing to do would just go in and get whatever they suggest.

    ----------

    Thanks. I don't consider myself better than anybody or anything like that. I just have my own interests. :D
     
  17. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #17
    you really can't go wrong with the bike, most bikes in the popular brands (carbon frame), are made in a factory owned by giant overseas. Aluminum bikes are not bad and I ride one right now but I would like to move up to carbon soon. It's more expensive and while the dollars spent don't equal results they will help with the mental aspect of it and a few physical ones. With a steel or aluminum bike the two downsides are weight and flex. The bike is heavier so it'll be tougher to take up hills. Not a lot but weight is weight. It's cheaper to knock 5 pounds off your body than your bike though so don't get too caught up in it. The flex is another piece. In the bottom bracket where the pedals connect a metal bike will flex a bit under load and a carbon bike will not. The flex is lost energy not delivered to the wheels and results in an inefficiency in power getting to the ground.

    I'd check out dealers in your town and test ride a trek, giant, specialized, and cannondale with at least shimano 105 or SRAM Rival Components. You'll find the prices about the same across the brands if the componentry is the same and that will allow you to determine which bike has the best combination of aggressive fit and comfort for you to ride it. Let me know if you have more questions. I'll do my best to help.

    Edit, I'd also suggest just a regular style road bike, a tri bike is for pretty serious triathletes and most people don't need it. You can clip on aero bars to get the same positional effect and be able to train more easily that way. Beyond positioning a tri bike is also given a slightly different seated position to activate different muscles so that the running and biking have different effects on the body. That's a bother big benefit of them but its not a huge difference for new comers and it'll be harder to ride for beginning (to a degree).
     
  18. Moyank24 macrumors 601

    Moyank24

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Location:
    in a New York State of mind
    #18

    Exactly. It also takes more pressure off of your legs, so you stay fresher for the run.

    I would start out with a road bike at first - the tri bike is great but it takes a lot of getting used to-it's uncomfortable at first. And if you are starting out with sprint tris I would recommend using a road bike first. As diane has said, you can modify a road bike with aero bars before moving fully to purchasing a tri bike.
     
  19. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #19
    I'd pick a race, even if it's a 2013 race, just so you have a target to work towards.

    I don't do tris but I do long distance cycle and a big reason I don't recommend a stationary bike is because you need to get used to the position your body will be in on your bike. You also need to get your butt in bike shape (i.e. your ass used to sitting on a hard bike saddle) and you can't do that on a stationary bike. I would recommend getting a trainer for your bike too (basically a stand you lock the rear of the bike into that provides resistance to the rear wheel) so that on days/nights you can't make it outside you can at least get some pedal time on your own bike.

    Of course I say this but when I first started getting into cycling it was on a mountain bike with road tires and I spent 2 nights a week after work on a stationary bike. I'd do stationary 2x a wk and ride 3x a week to get in shape for a charity ride that was 100 miles on day one and 40 miles on day two. And, yes, I did the ride on my 35lb mountain bike with street tires. I was as aerodynamic as a brick and barely made it but I made it. The majority of people opted to take one of the shorter routes and no one else did the 100 miles on a mountain bike so I was feeling pretty good about myself.

    Since then I've moved on to a road bike but at the time I was younger, ignorant and motivated so it all worked out but I doubt you'll see me trying a century on a mountain bike again. :D


    Lethal
     
  20. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #20

    You can. But if you pick a non-tri shop or a commuter/mountain bike shop, they won't really be able to suggest the "right" thing for you.

    This way, if you (or the person who asked the question), understands the differences, you already have a head start. If you want to do half-ironman distances next year and they try to sell you a flat-handlebar road bike, you'll be able to say no - even if they insist it will work (and it will work, just not as well)

    That said, many do find having a true road bike and a true tri bike to be an advantage for training. And don't forget the cross bike for the winter season.

    :)

    ----------


    I know you sort of corrected this in your next sentence, but the geometry really is different between the two, not just the handlebars but the entire frame. It is really important if someone wants to make the investment once and not end up with 3 bikes in the course of a few years. Again, a good shop will be able to walk you through all this and help you sort out your options.

    Yes, the clip ons will get you in an aero position but it won't do anything for the rest of your body.

    I do agree that many beginners can start out with a decent road bike and do many a sprint and be competitive for quite awhile this way.

    I just took a look at Jamis (on par with Trek/Specialized/Giant) and their entry level tri bike is $1775 (aluminim frame). The next model up - carbon - is $2500. Really not bad.

    ----------

    Ah hell Lethal, pick a mostly-dirt century and you'll be good to go. :D
     
  21. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #21
    Ugh. I can't imagine doing a dirt century. I will say I miss the lower gears on my mountain bike on extended climbs. I've got a compact double on my road bike and I'm probably going to drop a triple on it. So often I'm like, "If I just had one more gear...".


    Lethal
     
  22. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #22
    Dont get the triple. You'll regret it. I have one. It sucks. The baby ring up front is so useless for any real riding. Just my two cents.
     
  23. diane143 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #23


    You can try a new cassette first
     
  24. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #24
    Way better idea. What is your current cassette lethal?
     
  25. eric/ thread starter Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #25
    I'm having trouble finding a decent plan. I've found some, but they're either too difficult, or far too easy. Also, what sort of variations would you guys suggest? Like, bike uphill one day, flat ground the next? Mix?
     

Share This Page