Tripod Celebration Thread: Post Your Photos!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Phrasikleia, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #1
    That's right: a tripod love fest!

    After struggling for years with a succession of cheap tripods (four in total), I finally invested in one that should perform well and last a long time. It took me about a month to research, order, and receive the various items for it, but to me it seemed an eternity! I just received the final piece about an hour ago (legs for the second time, since the first ones arrived missing some parts :mad:), so I'm finally back in business with a tripod after a looong month without one!! :)

    In celebration of finally being in possession of a really functional tripod, I would like to start a thread where we can all post photos taken with one, summarizing in the process the various reasons why a tripod makes a great addition to a photographer's kit. I'll start it off with a list of reasons that come to mind for me, along with some representative photos.

    In no particular order:

    (all clickable)

    1) Shooting in low light.

    [​IMG]


    2) Creating the appearance of motion.

    [​IMG]


    3) Being your own model.

    (I have a bunch, but I'm not going to post them. ;))


    4) Holding the composition until the right moment to click.

    [​IMG]


    5) Holding the composition for multiple exposures.

    [​IMG]


    6) Macro.

    [​IMG]


    7) Light painting.

    [​IMG]


    8) Being inconspicuous while photographing people.

    [​IMG]


    That's what comes to mind for me. So how do you use your tripod? Let's see some photos! :)
     
  2. maddagascar macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    #2
  3. svndmvn Guest

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2007
    Location:
    Italy
    #3
    you might wanna consider this one, if you haven't already, since your T1i shoots video, in case you could use it that way too
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ..._7301YB_7301YB_4_Section_Aluminum_Tripod.html
    I'm not sure if this is any better or worse, they're probably quite similar
     
  4. maddagascar macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    #4

    i was considering that one, but i've been reading reviews and its alright. i might not be shooting videos that much from a tripod anyways, as i wouldn't have much time to set it up. usually if its a video, i'm running around moving..haha.

    but hopefully the first tripod link i put will be a good solid tripod.
     
  5. Artful Dodger macrumors 68020

    Artful Dodger

    Joined:
    May 28, 2004
    Location:
    In a false sense of reality...My Mind!
    #5
    This one was about 20-30 mins. before sunset and they were on the opposite side of the small lake. Tripod really helped out waiting for them to get into the right place.
     

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  6. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #6
    Coincidentally, I wrote some stuff about tripods for my website, so I've cut and pasted it below...

    I use a tripod for all my shots these days; it's just a habit I've got into. At first it seemed like a hassle, an imposition, but now I'd honestly feel unprepared if I ventured out without my three-legged friend. ;)


    The camera’s steady and, with the use of a cable release (and mirror lock-up too, if required), there should be no more camera shake...

    You can ‘lock’ your chosen composition, allowing you to walk around, eat a sandwich, take a leak, then return to the very same view...

    You can fine-tune a composition, allowing you to look into all four corners of the picture and check that the pic is exactly as you want it...

    You won’t need to compromise about apertures or shutter speeds. You can have as small an aperture as you want, for maximum depth of field (with a wide-angle lens, focused at the hyperfocal distance, that may be a few feet to infinity). You can choose long shutter speeds: f11 at 25 seconds? No problem. There’s no need to fret any longer about whether you can get away with hand-holding the camera at 1/30sec...

    You can make the camera adjustments from choice, not necessity. Be exact… not ‘approximate’...

    You can use the lowest ISO setting (typically ISO 100) for maximum definition...

    You can sort the focus out, once, so you won’t need to keep doing it...

    You can shoot a sequence of pix, with exactly the same composition. This makes it easier to pick the best shot out of the series, once you’ve transferred the pix to the editing software on your computer...

    You can take identically composed shots, but with different exposures, to combine with HDR tone-mapping software...

    You can react to the the changing scene, without the camera getting in the way. Cable release in hand, you’re ready to shoot at any moment. The light can change rapidly; those seconds count...

    You’re prepared for every eventuality. You go into an old church, a slate quarry, a gloomy wood; dark clouds gather, the sun sets, night falls. You can carry on shooting instead of making plans to come back another time...

    A tripod, ironically, gives you freedom. Your hands are free… to offer up filters, shade the lens from flare, etc...

    You can see the bigger picture: where the light is coming from, where the weather is headed. Staring through a viewfinder is like a racehorse wearing blinkers...

    You can get the very best out inexpensiveequipment. If you can stick to f/11 (typically the ‘sweet spot’ of most lenses), even your budget lens won’t look too bad. Maybe you won’t have to crash the credit card after all...

    A tripod helps you to be more patient, more considered, prepared to wait a little longer for the right light. It can help you to slow down. You’re not snap-shooting; photography becomes a more deliberate process...
     
  7. Phrasikleia thread starter macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #7
    ^^^Wow, such a great post! Did everybody read that?! This should be required reading for all photographers! :D
     
  8. Ruahrc macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    #8
    Great thread! Doylem's got it right with many, many good points about getting in the habit of using a tripod.

    One other (incredibly important, IMO) thing a tripod can do is let you effectively shoot angles and perspectives that would otherwise be hard or inconvenient to get. In my experience the photographs that I find most compelling are the ones that have new or unusual perspectives. We live our entire life seeing things at eye-height, so when you look at pictures taken a few inches above the ground, or with unique perspectives, those are the ones that really stick out.

    For example, this photo I took with a tripod. Because of the tripod I was able to get the camera really low to the ground. The grass in the photo is only goes up to your shin or your knee. When shooting perspectives such as this, it can be awkward or uncomfortable to hold the camera steady in this configuration and get a good sharp shot. But with a tripod you can fine-tune your composition and not need to worry about holding it steady. Also note that the tripod enabled me to use a GND filter here, and due to the low sunset light, it would have been very hard to get a sharp handheld shot.

    [​IMG]

    This next shot, the tripod enabled me to get a perspective on the waterfall that would otherwise have been difficult. Again, the tripod let me get low- these falls are only about a foot tall. Also I stuck my tripod out in the stream so I could shoot the fall a little more head-on rather than being a side view from the shore. I did not want to walk out into the thigh-deep water in my hiking boots, but sticking my tripod out there and using a cable release made it possible.

    [​IMG]

    You can take this concept even further if you want. by using your tripod as a boom, you can get new perspectives on scenes such as dangling your camera over a cliff, or held out over a patch of flowers that you wouldn't want to stomp all over just to get a shot.

    Another great reason for a tripod is if you are into panos. Putting the camera on a stable platform allows you to fine tune the individual frames, leading to straighter rows and less image lost due to cropping.

    [​IMG]

    In general, the tripod also increases the sharpness of your shots. In marginal light, you think that image stabilization saves the day, but shoot the same picture again on a tripod and you'll see how soft your handheld image really is. I found that while image stabilization is great and often will give you a usable shot in situations where you can't set up a tripod, you rarely get optimum "tack sharp" results in marginal light without a tripod. Using a tripod will show you how good your (even entry-level consumer) gear really is, and how lusting after L or gold ring glass can be fun but isn't always the best answer for better pictures.

    Ruahrc
     
  9. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #9
    Agreed about tripods.
    In essence a tripod gives you a whole new level of creativity. Why? You are no longer bound to hold the camera.
    Point in case picture below. I was the driver of the car that caused the light streak AND the operator of the camera (god I love the Hähnel Wireless Radio trigger :))
    Granted I am a bit of a night shot aficionado but you can create so many new images and effects if you have the tripod steady and expose for a longer time period.
    My tripod, albeit not the best i the world, was the best investment I ever made for my camera.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. maddagascar macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    #10
    risky frisky, leaving the camera there, but very cool shot..what were the settings?

    and can anybody recommend any good manfrotto tripods? similar if not better/sturdier/better angles to work with?


    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...um_Tripod.html

    that's the one i'm probably ordering tomorrow. i like it cause of the weight and fold size, the most load i'll probably ever have on it is a telephoto lens, either 70-200mm L-series or 70-300mmIS.
     
  11. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #11
    Actually not risky at all. It was a field way off the road at midnight at -22C. The tree alley stretches for almost 1 km and I was at the far end.

    But then again, no risk no fun :)

    The settings were: 17mm f11 (i think), 25sec exposure.
     
  12. jrm27 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
  13. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #13
    How many minutes?
     
  14. jrm27 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #14
    I think it was 120 30 second exposures stacked together.
     
  15. OrangeCuse44 macrumors 65816

    OrangeCuse44

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    #15
    Ever since I picked mine up, I don't want to shoot without it (unless I have to). I had the idea of this shot and took about 30 shots handheld until I decided to get out the tripod. The result was taking only 5 exposures at different angles, all with tack sharp focus. Now I can't imagine not using one even for simple shots. I crave the sharpness.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #16
    Here's a recent one I took, 18 second exposure with D700 and 24-70 f/2.8 @ f/22.

    I love these types of shots, tripods are indispensible in my opinion.

    [​IMG]

    SLC
     
  17. Phrasikleia thread starter macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #17
    Really enjoying the great shots being posted here, along with some terrific tips and insights. I hope anyone who might be on the fence about using a tripod will get something useful out of this thread. :)
     
  18. RHVC59 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 10, 2008
    Location:
    St. Johns, Portland, Oregon
    #18
    Tripods are a must for:
    Moon shots with long lens!
    Night shots!
    Bird shots! ...Should have remembered the triopd in the truck for the Eagle shots...
    Light trails on lonely Alaskan roads roads...
    Must have for getting the last bit of light in the sky...
     

    Attached Files:

  19. TheReef macrumors 68000

    TheReef

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Location:
    NSW, Australia.
    #19
    Firstly congrats on finally getting your new tripod.

    My tripod is falling to pieces and is full of sand but I couldn't shoot without it.

    It also makes a good "walking aid" when walking/balancing over slippery rocks in tricky situations (I'm not that old) ;)

    Here are a few shots taken with a slow shutter speed and low light using ISO100, also waiting for the right moment (for example waiting for the wave to wash back out).

    To be honest I find my tripod slow and clunky out of water and let shake reduction take over when there is enough light. (the joints are stiff and full of sand/salt and it doesn't stand straight...I think it's time for a new one)

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  20. Phrasikleia thread starter macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #20
    RHVC59 and TheReef, these are such superb shots! I just spent a lot of time pouring over each one.

    Now if this grey blanket of clouds over me would just go away, I could go out and do something with my new tripod. :::fingers crossed:::
     
  21. mtbdudex macrumors 68000

    mtbdudex

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2007
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    #21
    My tripod shots:
    Self Woodworking
    [​IMG]

    Lot(s) of moon shots + ISS:
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Saved $$ by taking family photo
    [​IMG]
     
  22. pdxflint macrumors 68020

    pdxflint

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon coast
    #22
    I'm going to try to do a lot more with a tripod because Phrasikleia and Doylem have both reminded me of how it can change one's entire approach to photography, actually making it feel much more like an artistic craft. In that light, here's my old (15 yr old) bogen with quick release three way head. It's basic, but can do the job pretty well. I'm lusting after a new carbon fiber Gitzo... but.

    I took the tripod out because I wanted to do a comparative lens test between two identical lenses, since I'm selling one and wanted to know if there was any sample variation. You just can't do this hand-held (as this shot is, BTW) because any difference in sharpness could easily be due to human factors, and usually are. So, I set the camera up and focused on an exact spot on the exposed part of the cut log, went from f/2.8 through f/22 in 1 stop intervals at three different focal lengths... the exact same thing with both lenses. Not a lot of variation between them, but I learned a lot about how the lens behaves-- way better than reading a review or reading a chart. Just flip throught the pictures fairly quickly running through the aperture settings... watch the light falloff decrease, the sharpness on the corners increase... then maybe decrease again. It's all about a steady platform.... so I'm going to do this.

    Anyway, this is just a pic of my tripod minus my camera--- for now. Next ones will be actual tripod-mounted shots. This shot, hand-held at 1/100 sec is nowhere as sharp as a tripod mounted shot, once you look at it larger. And I'm pretty steady.

    BTW: as Doylem said, it really does feel much freer once you realize your hands are free to do so many other things... and you can visualize the entire scene with your own eyes. I forgot how different that was...

    [​IMG]
     
  23. Designer Dale macrumors 68040

    Designer Dale

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Location:
    Folding space
    #23
    Don't forget the monopod. I had a bulky 20 year old Velbon tripod that I never used much. When I got my XSi I knew I needed something to provide stabilization that was portable as well. This introduced me to quality equipment (Manfrotto) and that thing called a ball head. When I set this shot up on the Pacific Lutheran University campus I was digesting the wisdom of Doylem about slowing down. I was able to frame up the shot and just watch campus life go buy until the sky and light got just right.

    [​IMG]
    EXIF Summary: 1/125s f/8.0 ISO100 30mm



    I got my version of a serious tripod (aluminum Manfrotto 055) just before my favorite archeologist opened her Let's Talk Tripods thread. I had to keep a good bite on my wallet to keep from doubling my money on carbon fiber… The tripod let me really take my time on the series of fast water shots I took on my Mountain Loop Highway shoot. I walked the bridge and had my framing visualized before I set the tripod up. With everything locked down, I was just able to relax and bracket shutter speeds until I had the texture I wanted. The hand held shots from this trip were not as well thought out.

    [​IMG]
    EXIF Summary: 1/8s f/8.0 ISO100 100mm

    Dale​
     
  24. firstapple macrumors 6502a

    firstapple

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    #24
    Phrasikleia,

    What lens did you use for the two macro shots of those flower? Absolutely gorgeous!
     
  25. Phrasikleia thread starter macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #25
    Hmm. I had actually forgotten the monopod. Quite easy for me to do since I've never used one. Would be happy to hear from monopod aficionados too!

    Ah, I remember this one fondly. It's no wonder Doylem was your inspiration here, it is rather Doylemesque. (That would be a high compliment, by the way.) ;)

    I too have to credit Doylem with inspiring me to use a tripod more often. Since I so often shoot in places where they are forbidden, I got into the bad habit of handholding even when I could have been using a tripod. I wish I could remember exactly what it was he said that got me to reconsider my tripod, but I'm pretty sure it involved the idea of letting the tripod hold the composition while waiting for the clouds to shift around and for the light to make some magic happen. I remember the turning point well. It was a photo I took while freezing my fingers off at a hilltop castle in December of 2008. The snow-capped Alps were in the distance, and cloud shadows were dancing all over a valley between me and the peaks. I nearly got frostbite, but boy did I have fun. :)

    I hope that archeologist appreciates being a favorite of such an upstanding member of the MR community. :)

    I'm really glad you and TheReef posted some rushing water shots. I think a tripod is really mandatory for these sorts of photos. With a tripod (and also maybe an ND filter), you have so much control over how the water will appear--from frozen droplets to nebulous currents, and everything in between.

    Thanks, firstapple. :) The purple one (a Black Iris) I took with the Canon 60mm f/2.8, and the pink one (a Stargazer) I took with the Canon 100mm f/2.8L IS.

    [Edit: Oops, nope. They were both taken with the 60mm. Here is one of the Stargazer I took with the 100mm:

    [​IMG]

    They're both great lenses. :)]
     

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