Trouble with old game and early Intel Macs

retta283

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I know this might not be the best place to post this, but I'm not sure any other sections would be better.

I have a number of early Intel (2006-07) Macs, and I have been trying out a number of games on them. One of the games I wanted to try is Garry's Mod. The Steam version no longer works due to updates, but I knew that GMod 10 would work. Sadly I cannot get BootCamp on these machines (drives already partitioned) so I am forced to use Wine or similar technologies.

Wine has worked fine for a number of games, but I've found a snag. My copy of GMod 10 was modified to disable Steam connection (to prevent updates, I do own the game on Steam) and as such I need to run a .bat file for it to work. I haven't yet seen a way to make this .bat file work under OS X. Wine or similar I have not found an option for running .bat. If anyone here has tried this before and knows if/how this can be done, please let me know.
 

Project Alice

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Jul 13, 2008
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Post Falls, ID
I know this might not be the best place to post this, but I'm not sure any other sections would be better.

I have a number of early Intel (2006-07) Macs, and I have been trying out a number of games on them. One of the games I wanted to try is Garry's Mod. The Steam version no longer works due to updates, but I knew that GMod 10 would work. Sadly I cannot get BootCamp on these machines (drives already partitioned) so I am forced to use Wine or similar technologies.

Wine has worked fine for a number of games, but I've found a snag. My copy of GMod 10 was modified to disable Steam connection (to prevent updates, I do own the game on Steam) and as such I need to run a .bat file for it to work. I haven't yet seen a way to make this .bat file work under OS X. Wine or similar I have not found an option for running .bat. If anyone here has tried this before and knows if/how this can be done, please let me know.
You can re-partition the drive without data loss. That's the whole purpose of bootcamp. You open the bootcamp utility and it will guide you through partitioning the drive.
 

retta283

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You can re-partition the drive without data loss. That's the whole purpose of bootcamp. You open the bootcamp utility and it will guide you through partitioning the drive.
The problem with Bootcamp is it only will function if your hard drive already has only one partition present. If you've already added a second one yourself (or more) it will error out upon opening with this reason. I'd hate to have to remove my existing partition scheme (3 OSes and a smaller partition for other uses) so I am looking for a way without Bootcamp.
 

Project Alice

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Jul 13, 2008
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The problem with Bootcamp is it only will function if your hard drive already has only one partition present. If you've already added a second one yourself (or more) it will error out upon opening with this reason. I'd hate to have to remove my existing partition scheme (3 OSes and a smaller partition for other uses) so I am looking for a way without Bootcamp.
You can also use disk utility to manually create a FAT32 partition of whatever size. That will automatically create the hybrid MBR/GPT scheme that bootcamp uses.
However, if you're dead set on not using boot camp, the only thing I can think of is WINE. Have you tried wineskins, or cross over? Those are a bit easier to configure than just WINE. See here about running batch files (found on a 5 second google)
You could also try a VM, but depending on what version of OS X you're using you'd probably need an older version, and most of the older versions of those (IE virtualbox) didn't add 3D support until later. You'd just have to install whatever the latest version will install is and see if it includes 3D support.

Personally, if this is something I knew I was going to spend a lot of time doing, I would install a hard drive, or SSD large enough to accommodate everything I needed. Intel Macs have no limit on what size of disk you can install.
 
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retta283

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What about running Parallels? There are older versions that run on Snow Leopard.
This is a possibility, but I'm not sure if it would work or not. I know there has been some improvement since the Snow Leopard days in terms of Parallels gaming, but back in the day it was not ideal. Since the ATi x1600 is already so low-end, it may not be enough.
 

Amethyst1

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This is a possibility, but I'm not sure if it would work or not. I know there has been some improvement since the Snow Leopard days in terms of Parallels gaming, but back in the day it was not ideal. Since the ATi x1600 is already so low-end, it may not be enough.
Agreed. Better go native to eek out any drop of performance.
 

bobesch

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Oct 21, 2015
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You could also try a VM, but depending on what version of OS X you're using you'd probably need an older version, and most of the older versions of those (IE virtualbox) didn't add 3D support until later. You'd just have to install whatever the latest version will install is and see if it includes 3D support.
With Fusion/Win2k no 3D-support! :( Fusion/WinXP does offer 3D-support, but isn't as snappy as Win2k.
What about Parallels and VirtualBox?
- - Post merged: - -

You can also use disk utility to manually create a FAT32 partition of whatever size. That will automatically create the hybrid MBR/GPT scheme that bootcamp uses.
Thanks for that hint! Gonna try that out ASAP, when a larger drive's available. A 10-20GB Partition with Win2k plus 3D support would be a burner!
 
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Project Alice

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With Fusion/Win2k no 3D-support! :( Fusion/WinXP does offer 3D-support, but isn't as snappy as Win2k.
What about Parallels and VirtualBox?
- - Post merged: - -


Thanks for that hint! Gonna try that out ASAP, when a larger drive's available. A 10-20GB Partition with Win2k plus 3D support would be a burner!
I actually got 3D working in fusion on Windows 2000. It's a little buggy sometimes but it works. For those that aren't Windows knowledgeable in this Mac forum; Windows XP and Windows 2000 are very similar under the hood. The most difference is the GUI changes and features like system restore. XP can take nearly all Windows 2000 drivers, and 2000 can work with some of XPs drivers.

Just install 2000, but tell vmware that it's XP installed. Install the drivers like normal.
 
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bobesch

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I actually got 3D working in fusion on Windows 2000. It's a little buggy sometimes but it works. For those that aren't Windows knowledgeable in this Mac forum; Windows XP and Windows 2000 are very similar under the hood. The most difference is the GUI changes and features like system restore. XP can take nearly all Windows 2000 drivers, and 2000 can work with some of XPs drivers.
Just install 2000, but tell vmware that it's XP installed. Install the drivers like normal.
Oh, that's good news!!!
Do I have pretend it's WinXP previous to installation or may I later trick in Fusion to recognize an installed Win2k as WinXP?
 

Project Alice

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Oh, that's good news!!!
Do I have pretend it's WinXP previous to installation or may I later trick in Fusion to recognize an installed Win2k as WinXP?
You can install it as XP. It really doesn't matter what fusion thinks it is. You can tell it FreeBSD is installed and it'll still work. Those choices are only there so the correct VM additions are installed, and so it can recommend a hardware configuration. If you pick XP for example, and than add a SATA drive, it'll complain everytime you boot it up that XP doesn't have support for SATA even if you installed SATA drivers on your own.