Trying to build a wireless network :)

skywalkgr

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jul 11, 2005
18
0
Hello

I have two apple computers. The first one is a powermac g4 single@1,25 (fw400) and the other one is an iBook g4 12inch with airport extreme card installed.

If i buy an apple base station and a apple airport card (not the extreme edition) i will be able to build a wireless network and share my DSL connection to both machines or not? Do i have to buy something else or extra??

Thank you
 

skywalkgr

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jul 11, 2005
18
0
The apple base station does not function as a router? Its only an access point device?
 

grapes911

Moderator emeritus
Jul 28, 2003
6,994
3
Citizens Bank Park
skywalkgr said:
The apple base station does not function as a router? Its only an access point device?
The base station is a router. But almost any router will work. You don't have to spend a fortune on the Apple one, unless it's the one you really want. I am partial to the Linksys WRT54G. I think its the best sub $200 router you can find. Sometimes it is as cheep as $40 (after rebate) at Best buy and circuit city.
 

skywalkgr

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jul 11, 2005
18
0
i understand exactly what you mean. Ok then i will buy a Linksys wireless router and an airport card for my powermac :)

Thank you very much for your help :)
 

homerjward

macrumors 68030
May 11, 2004
2,745
0
fig tree
you don't actually need to buy a router, unless you need your powermac to be wireless. you can just buy an airport card for your powermac, then share the ethernet connection (dsl) to the airport connection. i do the same thing only reversed (sharing airport over ethernet) for my xbox and it works great.
 

grapes911

Moderator emeritus
Jul 28, 2003
6,994
3
Citizens Bank Park
homerjward said:
you don't actually need to buy a router, unless you need your powermac to be wireless. you can just buy an airport card for your powermac, then share the ethernet connection (dsl) to the airport connection. i do the same thing only reversed (sharing airport over ethernet) for my xbox and it works great.
I can't recommend this. It is a great temporary solution, and fine for once in a while gaming, but it adds extra wear-and-tear to your computer. You may not think it is much, but it can really add up. Not the best permeant solution. It's definitely worth spending money on a wireless router (hell, get a really cheep no-name brand if you are worried about cash).
Problems with this solution:
1. The Power Mac will have to be on for other computers to get wireless.
2. If the PM breaks or needs service, you loose wireless.
3. The PM does does more calculations than it has too, limiting life.
4. The range is almost always better with a router.
5. Much more security options in a router.
 

Ugg

macrumors 68000
Apr 7, 2003
1,991
16
Penryn
greatdevourer said:
I would recommend the Express, but only because it's tiny and cool and it shares my printer

Same here. And it is also very portable, handy if you travel or have a small space and despice cords!
 

iQuit

macrumors 6502a
May 13, 2005
517
1
If you want your WiFi range to be good get a High Gain 6dBi 2.4 GHz omnidirectional antenna. I saw one at CompUSA for only 19 dollars.
 

mpw

Guest
Jun 18, 2004
6,364
1
While we're talking wireless a quick WEP question.

When I set up my new router I specified WEP and added a passphrase which generated a 13 pair code. When I connect from my iBook I'm asked for the password but do I input the passphrase, 26 digit code or 13 pair with periods or spaces? None of these seem to work.
 

grapes911

Moderator emeritus
Jul 28, 2003
6,994
3
Citizens Bank Park
mpw said:
While we're talking wireless a quick WEP question.

When I set up my new router I specified WEP and added a passphrase which generated a 13 pair code. When I connect from my iBook I'm asked for the password but do I input the passphrase, 26 digit code or 13 pair with periods or spaces? None of these seem to work.
I don't have an answer for you, but is your network capable of anything stronger than WEP (like maybe WPA). WEP is like locking your bike with a plastic chain.
 

mpw

Guest
Jun 18, 2004
6,364
1
grapes911 said:
I don't have an answer for you, but is your network capable of anything stronger than WEP (like maybe WPA). WEP is like locking your bike with a plastic chain.
Bugger this is something I'm gonna have to read up on. Yes it has WPA two flavours but I don't know what the differences are to WEP etc.
 

Trekkie

macrumors 6502a
Nov 13, 2002
906
16
Wake Forest, NC
grapes911 said:
I can't recommend this. It is a great temporary solution, and fine for once in a while gaming, but it adds extra wear-and-tear to your computer. You may not think it is much, but it can really add up. Not the best permeant solution. It's definitely worth spending money on a wireless router (hell, get a really cheep no-name brand if you are worried about cash).
Problems with this solution:
1. The Power Mac will have to be on for other computers to get wireless.
2. If the PM breaks or needs service, you loose wireless.
3. The PM does does more calculations than it has too, limiting life.
4. The range is almost always better with a router.
5. Much more security options in a router.
'adds additional wear and tear? That's a joke right?

#1, and #2 are the only semi-valid points assuming that the computer is shut off or allowed to sleep. I don't with mine, I only dim the display.

#3 Solid state devices don't 'wear out' by doing 'more calculations'. This won't hurt it in the slightest. That's nuts.

#5 is downright wrong. You can be much more creative with your security options with Mac OS X than you can with a router.
 

Trekkie

macrumors 6502a
Nov 13, 2002
906
16
Wake Forest, NC
grapes911 said:
I don't have an answer for you, but is your network capable of anything stronger than WEP (like maybe WPA). WEP is like locking your bike with a plastic chain.
Nah, it's more like a regular lock with only two digits. If the person tries enough they can get it in but most people just ignore it and walk on by.
 

grapes911

Moderator emeritus
Jul 28, 2003
6,994
3
Citizens Bank Park
Trekkie said:
'adds additional wear and tear? That's a joke right?
No joke. Whenever you use any electronic device, you just shortened its life. Thats just how things work.

#1, and #2 are the only semi-valid points assuming that the computer is shut off or allowed to sleep. I don't with mine, I only dim the display.
That's not too healthy for the computer


#3 Solid state devices don't 'wear out' by doing 'more calculations'. This won't hurt it in the slightest. That's nuts.
A wireless card may or may not contain solid state parts, but I don't know of any card that is completely solid state.


#5 is downright wrong. You can be much more creative with your security options with Mac OS X than you can with a router.
I just went to "create netework" on my PowerBook. No where do I see MAC filtering, WPA, etc, etc. So what creative security options are you talking about?


I'll stick with a router until someone can prove that there are more advantages to using my Mac.
 

hdknight

macrumors newbie
Aug 7, 2005
2
0
Metro DC
Did you put a $ sign before your wep key. That seems to be the ticket any time I'm joining a windows based wep wifi network.

2. Hexadecimal password
If you were given a password that uses only the hexadecimal range of characters (which are: abcdef0123456789), put a dollar sign ($) before the password. These passwords are 10 characters long for 40-bit encrypted networks or 26 characters long for 128-bit encrypted networks. In a hexadecimal password, the dollar sign is called the Hex Escape. It notifies the software that the characters that follow it should be treated as a hexadecimal number. Other possible hex escapes are "0x" and "0X" (zero-x, and the "x" may be upper or lower case).

Example of 40-bit: $1234abcdef
Example of 128-bit: $12345678901234567890abcdef
 

DocB

macrumors newbie
Sep 24, 2004
14
0
Wichita, KS
I apologize for jumping on this thread but it seems consistent with the question I have...I am currently using a iMac G5 and soon my wife will be purchasing an iBook. I'll be setting up a wireless network at that time and will finally get set up to do Xbox Live.

Here are my questions: Will the AirPort base station work with Xbox?

If not, which wireless router do you recommend for for performance and ease of use?

And then, if I use a third party router, will AirPort Express work with that router as a bridge to help with the connection to the Xbox (computer is upstairs, Xbox is down)?

Thank you in advance for your replies.
 
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