Trying to decide between MacBook Pros

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Texasgator, Jul 7, 2012.

  1. Texasgator macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    #1
    Hi y'all,
    I am a long time windows user with an 10 year old desktop computer I want to replace with a MacBook pro w/ retina. I dont game anymore and would mostly use it for surfing the web, documents, and the occasional HD home movie editing and picture editing. I would be happy with the base model with an upgrade in ram to 16gb but I am a little concerned about the hard drive size. Would I be better off just getting the base model and put the extra cash toward an accessory or apple care? Or should I upgrade to the mid model for double the hard drive size? This would be my first Mac and am pretty stoked about it and want to get the right one the first time.
     
  2. Black.Infinity macrumors 6502

    Black.Infinity

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2010
    Location:
    Apple tree-Toronto
    #2
    You can buy applecare later, you have one year from the date of purchase to buy applecare.

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    BTW new macs have usb3 which is soo fast if you want to use external hard drive.
     
  3. BigZ9 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    #3
    Well, for your hard drive fiasco, it really depends on what you're gonna keep on it. Say if you have a lot of media files, tons of movies and such, and you don't wanna keep them on an external drive then the 512GB might be a better option for you. Personally I think the 256GB with an external drive is a better option cause you're gonna need an external drive for time machine backups, so you can store any large files that you don't need at the ready on there too.
     
  4. Man9z0r macrumors regular

    Man9z0r

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Location:
    SLO, CA
    #4
    I personally think you could save a lot of money by not buying the retina. You don't need it for anything you do. You could easily save close to a grand on buying a regular pro or even an air.
     
  5. Texasgator thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    #5
    The main reason I went with the retina MacBook is the types of ports it has. (usb3, thunderbolt, hdmi) The MacBook would become my only computer and I want to make sure I get something that will last and will have enough power for the future. I am thinking that the external hard drive is a good idea. Would I be better served with a usb3 compatable hard drive or a thunderbolt?
     
  6. NewbieCanada macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    #6
    I would say usb3 - more compatible with other computers should you need to transfer information, costs much less and while TB may be way faster than usb3, BOTH are way faster than hard drives
     
  7. TyroneShoes2, Jul 7, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2012

    TyroneShoes2 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    #7
    I have to agree with this. Certain technology such as a retina display on a laptop emerges slowly, sort of like passing health care reform and not really seeing the benefits at first. Kudos to Apple for being out front and leading the industry on this, but at what cost to prospective buyers? It is important that you know what you are getting when paying this premium and how or even whether it will really benefit you. There are a lot of issues here to weigh.

    If you set the "slider" in a retina-display MBP to where Apple recommends it for the best experience, it downscales the desktop to 1440x900, which is 1/4th the resolution of the retina display capability, and exactly the native resolution of the non-retina display. That seems completely ironic until you understand the baggage that a retina display carries with it. If you set the display to its native rez of 2880x1800, the icons and menu bar are now teeny-tiny, 1/4th the size they would normally be. And wherever you set it, you still have to have the GPU headroom to push 4 times the normal number of pixels for the native rez.

    Bottom line, simply increasing native resolution is not without complications and tradeoffs; it is impractical to use the higher native rez for many tasks, including Finder tasks; and it will really only benefit today folks who are using Aperture, iPhoto, and a few other programs that have been "retinized" and can benefit from it. Many apps currently look terrible on the retina display at recommended settings, at least for the moment. It honestly is not quite ready for prime time, just like Thunderbolt still isn't, a year or so later.

    Apple tries to future your purchase with emerging technology, which is a good thing, but that it is still emerging is also the problem; A retina display a year or two from now will be much more immediately beneficial compared to paying for that premium today, while on the other hand if you buy it today and expect to reap that benefit two or three years down the road, you will not be saddled with a non-retina laptop that is therefore obsolete. That is a classic approach/avoidance conflict, and just one more drag on the decision what to buy and when.

    The other thing is Applecare, which like any other extended warranty is usually something not really in the best interests of the customer. The difference here is that the RMBP is a "throwaway" device like the iPad and iPhone (and probably the first laptop in that category); there are few if any user-serviceable parts, or parts that can be repaired or replaced by anyone. The whole thing is glued together in a way that makes it unrepairable, and that means that a failed LCD screen or backlight, for instance, implies a full laptop replacement, at a full laptop replacement cost.

    That sort of "unanswers" a previously-answerable question regarding whether Applecare is good insurance, or simply gouging the customer, which is what most extended warranties really turn out to be.

    It's good to have these choices; the downside is that it implies that decisions must be made.
     
  8. Man9z0r macrumors regular

    Man9z0r

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Location:
    SLO, CA
    #8
    All of the MacBooks have the same ports except for the HDMI. You will get USB3 and Thunderbolt on all of the MacBooks thought. Honestly it is your money and decision to buy what ever you want I was just making the point you could easily get a normal MBP or even an MBA and external monitor for the price of the MBPR. Not to mention then you have the upgradeability at least with all the other Pros. So you could start with 4 or 8 gigs of ram and up it to 16 and also start with a smaller hard drive and upgrade it if need be.

    Apple also does a pretty good job of making their software work on all their machines. I know people with MBP's from 5 years ago still running fine.

    Well what ever you buy I hope you enjoy your first Apple! :D
     
  9. Texasgator thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    #9
    Thanks for the advice! I'm really starting to question my desire for all the power and am starting to seriously consider one of the older MacBook pros. Now another question: would an air be as usable for video editing as the pro or not really?
     
  10. TheGenerous macrumors 6502a

    TheGenerous

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    Location:
    I'm an Austronaut
    #10
    If you're going to use the new mac for another 10 years then go with whatever you like or feel the impulse.

    I have a regular MacBook from 2006 and I'm still ok with editing photographs and photoshop CS6 work. The only thing is Lion is so slow, and flash videos in HD sometimes get slow.
     
  11. Man9z0r macrumors regular

    Man9z0r

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Location:
    SLO, CA
    #11
    The Air will totally do normal use video editing. If you are planning on doing a ton of it I would go the Pro route but honestly like I said earlier they have more power then you would expect. If you are just doing video editing with your spare time and family videos I don't think you are going to be disappointed with the Air. If you are doing it more then adverage you might want to go the Pro route just because of the decreased processing time.

    The Air is a pretty amazing maching and even more so with the Ivy Bridge processor.
     

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