Twitter for Mac Gains Improved Touch Bar Support

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Twitter this week updated its Twitter for Mac app, introducing improved Touch Bar support for those who have a Mac with a Touch Bar.

According to the release notes for the update, it includes Touch Bar options for switching tabs and searching when the main window is in focus along with new buttons when using the composer to create a tweet or viewing a user's profile page.

Twitter for Mac's Touch Bar interfaces from MacRumors reader Noah Evans

Twitter's full release notes for the update are below:
We made a number of improvements to Twitter. A few highlights specific to Twitter for Mac:

Fixed: App freezes for text input or delete with certain languages such as Chinese

- Improvement: added buttons to switch tabs to touch bar when main app window is in focus
- Improvement: added search button to touch bar when main app window is in focus
- Improvement: added more buttons to touch bar when composer is in focus
- Improvement: added more buttons to touch bar when viewing a user's profile page
Twitter released this new version of Twitter for Mac back in October, when macOS Catalina came out. macOS Catalina was built using Apple's Catalyst feature that allows iPad apps to be ported over to the Mac.

Catalyst allowed Twitter to re-release Twitter for Mac, which it had previously discontinued early in 2018. The Twitter for Mac app offers a design and capabilities similar to the iPhone and iPad apps, but with Mac-specific tweaks such as Touch Bar support.

Article Link: Twitter for Mac Gains Improved Touch Bar Support
 

Westside guy

macrumors 603
Oct 15, 2003
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The soggy side of the Pacific NW
I love the idea of the touch bar, but I haven't really ever found it that beneficial on my macbook.
The Touch Bar only exists because Apple made such a big deal mocking touchscreen laptops, then found out that touch can sometimes be useful. Plus app designers can't count on it being on a given Apple laptop, so they don't put a lot of effort into incorporating Touch Bar controls into their apps.

Eventually Apple's going to have to bite the bullet and make a touchscreen Mac.
 

frou

macrumors 6502a
Mar 14, 2009
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The Touch Bar only exists because Apple made such a big deal mocking touchscreen laptops, then found out that touch can sometimes be useful.
Was it even primarily about usefulness? Versus simply a way to jazz up the MBP aesthetic, which was already a bit stale even then.
 

gplusplus

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Mar 5, 2018
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These are completely useless features for people who don’t look at the keyboard as they type, such as pretty much anyone who is good at typing.
 
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tegranjeet

macrumors member
Apr 5, 2019
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Boulder, CO
Touchbar is such lame tech. Who approved it? Why is is still here? Why should I look away from the screen to do something? I inadvertently touch it sometimes and dim the screen or change the volume. Unexpected behavior is a lame user experience. Just make the screen touchable Apple, sheesh, and the keyboard a freaking keyboard. Not a touchboard. We already have the great trackpad for touch.
 

DeepIn2U

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May 30, 2002
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These are completely useless features for people who don’t look at the keyboard as they type, such as pretty much anyone who is good at typing.
Us older people barely look at the keyboard as we type - touch-typing it's called.

Kids and youth under 34 today actually DO look at a desktop / laptop keyboard as they type ... they predominately use 3 fingers on each hand to type as well.

I had a little fun at a former employer when asked to help at a few analysts' computers by asking them to type their name to test a newly installed keyboard or new OS language installation, by not looking. Everyone out of 40 could NOT do it without looking.
 

buttongerald

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Jan 29, 2016
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Kids and youth under 34 today actually DO look at a desktop / laptop keyboard as they type ... they predominately use 3 fingers on each hand to type as well.
Bit of a broad reach here. I'm 32 and I can type without looking at a keyboard just fine. Might want to adjust the wording.

I had a little fun at a former employer when asked to help at a few analysts' computers by asking them to type their name to test a newly installed keyboard or new OS language installation, by not looking. Everyone out of 40 could NOT do it without looking.
That doesn't seem like a stretch but no one should be judged for it. When switching between say my wired Apple Keyboard to my Mechanical Logitech one it feels very different and it takes me a moment or two to adjust to it. Having someone type on a keyboard they may never have touched before and then having a giggle at the fact they had to look to get a feel for the board or that they made a mistake is just kind of strange.

It'd be the same with driving different cars as well, people need to adjust to something they may not be familiar with regardless of how similar it is, it's still different. A car is a car but not all cars are built the same nor drive the same.
 

H3LL5P4WN

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And Tweetbot, an app you actually have to pay for, still hasn't got Touch Bar support.
You do realize that Twitter and Tapbots are separate companies, right?

These are completely useless features for people who don’t look at the keyboard as they type, such as pretty much anyone who is good at typing.
Or, it's a novel new interface to interact with. Though with the removal of 3D Touch, I'm surprised the Touch Bar exists to begin with.

Oh, and I didn't look at my keyboard, which is a Logitech Craft (if you care), to type this.
 

TMRJIJ

macrumors 68040
Dec 12, 2011
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South Carolina, United States
Us older people barely look at the keyboard as we type - touch-typing it's called.

Kids and youth under 34 today actually DO look at a desktop / laptop keyboard as they type ... they predominately use 3 fingers on each hand to type as well.

I had a little fun at a former employer when asked to help at a few analysts' computers by asking them to type their name to test a newly installed keyboard or new OS language installation, by not looking. Everyone out of 40 could NOT do it without looking.
Really? Because I work at a repair shop and see the exact opposite effect. Everyone here over 34 enjoys 'pecking' at their keyboard with two fingers while my generation can actually achieve at least 60 wpm.
 
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H3LL5P4WN

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Bit of a broad reach here. I'm 32 and I can type without looking at a keyboard just fine. Might want to adjust the wording.
And meanwhile my parents who are in their 60s have to look at the keyboard to type. It's the same keyboard they've had since the late 90s. (It has a DIN to PS/2 adapter, plugged into a PS/2 to USB adapter.)

It'd be the same with driving different cars as well, people need to adjust to something they may not be familiar with regardless of how similar it is, it's still different. A car is a car but not all cars are built the same nor drive the same.
Great analogy.
 

konqerror

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Dec 31, 2013
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I had a little fun at a former employer when asked to help at a few analysts' computers by asking them to type their name to test a newly installed keyboard or new OS language installation, by not looking. Everyone out of 40 could NOT do it without looking.
You showed that people can't touch type on unfamiliar keyboard layouts. Your point?
 

DeepIn2U

macrumors 603
May 30, 2002
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Bit of a broad reach here. I'm 32 and I can type without looking at a keyboard just fine. Might want to adjust the wording.

That doesn't seem like a stretch but no one should be judged for it. When switching between say my wired Apple Keyboard to my Mechanical Logitech one it feels very different and it takes me a moment or two to adjust to it. Having someone type on a keyboard they may never have touched before and then having a giggle at the fact they had to look to get a feel for the board or that they made a mistake is just kind of strange.

It'd be the same with driving different cars as well, people need to adjust to something they may not be familiar with regardless of how similar it is, it's still different. A car is a car but not all cars are built the same nor drive the same.
I'm speaking from my experience ... you may disagree from your own experiences yet that doesn't make mine invalid.

I learned to type on a manual typewriter back in 1983 ... then to computers (Commodore Pet, Vic20, 64, then Apple ][e in 1984-1986. Laptop keyboards and slim keyboards from early 1995 to present day.

when I touch type I do tend to hammer harder on the keys than most people in my age group (mid 40's) or younger than me (my son being 21). That said there is also a distinct rhythm that emanates when I touch type.

A side note .... when I learned to touch type on that manual keyboard ... numerical keys above home row was a serious pain and I never learned to adjust. Since 1983 and helping my mom late day/nights on weekends at her work doing data entry for numbers ... I used a computer right side numerical keypad and touch typing numbers using that was a bliss.

Changing from various different keyboards with varying key travel does have an effect ... more adversely learning on a laptop then going to a mechanical keyboard, yet vice versa I'd personally found it pleasing.

we can agree to disagree yet sharing our experiences is welcome
 

gplusplus

macrumors regular
Mar 5, 2018
191
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Us older people barely look at the keyboard as we type - touch-typing it's called.

Kids and youth under 34 today actually DO look at a desktop / laptop keyboard as they type ... they predominately use 3 fingers on each hand to type as well.

I had a little fun at a former employer when asked to help at a few analysts' computers by asking them to type their name to test a newly installed keyboard or new OS language installation, by not looking. Everyone out of 40 could NOT do it without looking.
Hey boomer, I’m 32 and type about 80 words per minute without looking at the keyboard.
 
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Itada

macrumors member
Sep 22, 2019
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You do realize that Twitter and Tapbots are separate companies, right?
Of course, that's my point: I was replying to someone who noted how long it took Twitter to add Touch Bar support, and pointed out that even a paid app like Tweetbot (where you'd think the developers would be motivated to make their client as good as possible, given all the restrictions placed on third-party clients by Twitter) still hasn't bothered to add support for it.

So while Twitter took years to add support, even paid third-party clients still haven't, which is quite disappointing.
 

H3LL5P4WN

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Jun 19, 2010
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Of course, that's my point: I was replying to someone who noted how long it took Twitter to add Touch Bar support, and pointed out that even a paid app like Tweetbot (where you'd think the developers would be motivated to make their client as good as possible, given all the restrictions placed on third-party clients by Twitter) still hasn't bothered to add support for it.

So while Twitter took years to add support, even paid third-party clients still haven't, which is quite disappointing.
Ah, ok. I get you now. I also wonder if it's something that Twitter is blocking 3rd parties from doing. I don't think common buttons like Reply and Send would be blocked at the API level, but you never know what Twitter is doing next to shoot themselves in the foot.
 

gplusplus

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Mar 5, 2018
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what’s your accuracy?
I type 84wpm with 95% accuracy.
With vernacular English, I’m at about 90%. So effectively, you’re much faster than I am. But we’re both much faster than average.

With weird words or otherwise highly complicated content, I might slow down almost indefinitely. For example, if I’m hammering away model numbers and other non-words, I can crawl down to like 10 WPM. Those typing tests/games that make you peck random keys instead of typing words bring me down to usually about 10-20 WPM.

Programming in an IDE with a language I’m good at, probably around 40-50 WPM ish. It’s a bit different with programming, though, since I may burst super fast, but I spend way more time thinking than I do typing. In other words, if I typed at 10 WPM versus 200, I’d still take about the same amount of time to code something.
 
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