Two questions for traveler

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by sergio vadora, Jul 29, 2008.

  1. sergio vadora macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    #1
    Hi everybody, my name is Sergio, I'm from Italy, and this is my first message. Please, excuse me for my poor english!
    Next september I'll fly to California and I'll take with me my 3 videocameras (two for use, one in case of damage of the others).

    Here the two questions:

    any problems with carry-on X ray scanner at airport? I'll use an anti-xray bag, but you never know......

    Second:
    there will be the possibility to jump out of the car (with air conditioning) to take videos outside (with higher desert temperature) without the risk of condestation?

    I know the best is to wait a bit, I'll use the camera bag to be sure the temperature will be "cut" slowly, but if I have rush to use immidiatly what I have to do? My target will be the trains.....that's why I colud have no time to wait!

    Thanks in advance for your answers.
    CIAO CIAO
    Sergio
     
  2. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #2
    The X-Ray machines at modern airports shouldn't present a problem for tapes or camera. You do have to worry about some third-world countries ... though not from the X-Rays, but from the magnetic field the machines can produce. Poorly maintained machines are often poorly shielded and excessive EMF can cause tape problems.

    I haven't traveled for shooting in a while, but this is what I used to do to get my gear there in one piece and on time. I'd ship the gear, insured via FedEx to my destination hotel so it would be there when I arrived. Never had to worry about some of it not getting there.

    -DH
     
  3. AviationFan macrumors 6502a

    AviationFan

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    #3
    Welcome to the forum, Sergio. As far as condensation goes, that can be a problem taking cold equipment into air that is both warm and moist. It's not so bad for the electronics, but the lens can fog up and make shooting impossible. If you are in the desert, however, the air should be very dry, so I'd give it a try and see if it even is a problem in the area you are going to.

    If it does present a problem, one thing you can do - besides not running the AC too much (i.e. keep the inside of the car a little warmer than you'd normally do) - is to keep the camera in the trunk of the car. If it gets too hot in the trunk, put your gear into a well sealed bag and alternate between the trunk and the inside of the car every now and then, so that it gets neither too cold nor too hot.

    Have a nice trip!

    - Martin
     
  4. sergio vadora thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    #4
    Thanks for the suggestions!

    So I have to be safe for x ray (is not the first ime that I travel but every time i get paranoy.....) and I'll use a "low power" AC in the car.....hope my wife will agree!

    Do you know which is the difference of temperature to have condensation? For example, 10, 20, or more between inside and outside?

    CIAO CIAO
    Sergio
     
  5. AviationFan macrumors 6502a

    AviationFan

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    #5
    Sergio,

    You'd have to know what the dew point of the outside air is. Dew point is a measure for the humidity of air that is commonly used here in the US, while other countries prefer to specify relative humidity. If the dew point of the outside air is 65 degrees Farenheit, to name a number, you'd have to cool the air down to that temperature (65 degrees) before water vapor condenses into water. In this example, if your camera is colder than 65 degrees, it can cool down the surrounding air to a temperatur below the dew point and thus cause condensation. As long as the temperature (of the camera) is above the dew point, there should be no condensation.

    If you are in a dry desert, odds are that dew points will be fairly low, so you may never have a problem. If the air feels humid, though, check the dew point (for example through www.weather.com) and plan accordingly.

    - Martin
     

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