two-step verification or two factor authentication

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by fet12, Mar 23, 2016.

  1. fet12 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    #1
    which one do you guys use and if you do use it which one do you prefer?
     
  2. mattopotamus macrumors G4

    mattopotamus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    #2
    Not sure what the difference is. I have two-step verification. Anytime I log into iCloud or apple.com it makes me verify it with either my phone or my phone number via a text message it sends.
     
  3. Rigby macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #3
    I prefer the old two-step version, because it allows me to recover my account myself using the recovery key if necessary. In the new two-factor version you have to go through a lengthy process with Apple support if you lose access to all trusted devices. But that may be the better approach for people who can't or don't want to keep track of a recovery key.
     
  4. mattopotamus macrumors G4

    mattopotamus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    #4
    If two step fails, you can always fall back on the recovery key.
     
  5. Rigby macrumors 601

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    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #5
    That's what I wrote. But the new two-FACTOR method does not have a recovery key anymore.
     
  6. mattopotamus macrumors G4

    mattopotamus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    #6
    I use two factor, and I have a recovery key. Does that just mean the recovery key is now useless?
     
  7. Rigby macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #7
    Did you previously use the old two-step system and then switched to two-factor? If so, then yes, your old recovery key is now useless. Instead, you'll have to request account recovery through Apple: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204921. If you are still on two-step, your key is of course still valid.

    They probably changed this because too many people lost their recovery keys and weren't able to recover their account under the old policy.
     
  8. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #8
    How can you tell if you're on 2-step or 2-factor?
     
  9. Rigby macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #9
    Log in to appleid.apple.com. In the Security section it should say which method is active.
     
  10. Shanghaichica macrumors 603

    Shanghaichica

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2013
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    When did you set yours up? I only set mine up about 2 weeks ago and I was given a recovery key.
     
  11. Rigby macrumors 601

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    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #11
  12. garirry macrumors 68000

    garirry

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2013
    Location:
    Canada is my city
    #12
    Actually, according to the article you posted above, as long as you have a phone number that you trust that is associated with your account, you can use that to recover the account. It is designed for people who are responsible when it comes to tinkering with technology and stuff like that.
     
  13. Rigby macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #13
    Sure. That doesn't help you much if you lose the phone with the trusted number though.
    I liked the recovery key as the last resort better than going through Apple support.
     
  14. CosmoPilot macrumors 65816

    CosmoPilot

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2010
    Location:
    South Carolina
    #14
    Under the old system (2-Step), if someone tries to hack your account remotely, Apple will suspend your password. At that point, you must have your recovery key.

    I think many people using the 2-Step mistakenly believe as long as they have 2 of the 3 requirements (trusted device and password) they don't need to safeguard the recovery key.

    Again, if someone tries hacking your account, your password becomes null and void and the recovery key is all that will save you.

    It's a great system (2-Step) if you protect and have access to the key.
     

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