Txting taking over from phone calls?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by whooleytoo, May 3, 2007.

  1. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #1
    Not directly iPhone related, but could have a huge bearing on iPhone's usage and adoption (from The Register):

    Mobile phone call volumes have dropped for the first time in 10 years, according to the annual JD Power survey.

    The survey, of nearly 3,000 UK mobile phone users, found that pre-paid customers are making an average of 10 calls a week, falling from 14 last year. Contract customers average 27, down from 35 in 2006, but those customers are now sending 46 text messages every week, up from 32.

    A lot of this is down to the wider adoption of text messaging for communications - once the preserve of the youth, people of all ages are now learning to abuse the English language in pursuit of squeezing meaning into 160 characters.

    More worrying for the network operators is the amount customers are saving by using text. A pre-pay customer is now spending an average of £12.35 per month, down from £19.29 last year, and even contract customers have seen a 20 per cent drop in their bill (from £40.44 to £32.45).

    Among pre-paid customers, those with O2 are spending the most, averaging £13.95 every month, while Virgin customers are only spending £10.90. Orange has the most spendthrift contract customers, averaging £37 a month, while Virgin is again the home of the cost-conscious at £26.50.

    Despite falling incomes, the networks are still desperate to reduce churn rates. Forty-six per cent of contract customers have received some form of bribe for their loyalty, generally handset upgrades for those with contracts, and free credit for the pre-paid.

    The survey notes that modern handsets offer such a range of entertainment there's little time to make phone calls - users are busy playing games, watching videos, and checking on their eBay auctions.

    --

    If txting continues this progress, the iPhone's on-screen keyboard, and its ease and speed of use become even more critical features.
     
  2. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #2
    Has the 'ease of use' and speed been confirmed by users in the wild? I find it hard to believe text entry will be easier on a touch-screen than a thumb-keypad. I had (and loved, for text entry) a Nokia 9300i, I'm more excited about the prospect of the new Nokia E90 over the iPhone, feature-wise it's gonna pound the iPhone.

    Also this is one of my first post in the iPhone forums; I understand the phone is gonna run a version of OSX, Jobs stated at the switch to Intel that all future models running Mac would get Mac in the name. So why iPhone not MacPhone?
     
  3. whooleytoo thread starter macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #3
    I probably could have worded that more clearly. ;)

    Try: "whether or not the on-screen keyboard can be used easily and quickly will become more crucial questions".

    We have little idea - yet - how practical the keyboard will be, but if usage patterns are shifting towards txt rather than voice communications, along with a greater usage of email by the general mobile market, then Apple had better hope they got it right.
     
  4. neven macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #4
    "Also this is one of my first post in the iPhone forums; I understand the phone is gonna run a version of OSX, Jobs stated at the switch to Intel that all future models running Mac would get Mac in the name. So why iPhone not MacPhone?"

    Mac has traditionally been Apple's name for their "computers". Whether iPhone is a computer is a subjective decision; Apple probably want to epmhasize that it's a "new device", so they won't talk about it as a "mobile computer".

    You mentioned models "running Mac"; perhaps you meant "running Mac OS X" or "running OS X". iPhone does the latter. I think we'll see those two differentiated more in the future. iPhone and AppleTV run "OS X"; Macs run "Mac OS X". The difference is that Macs include desktop software which would be impractical (or impossible) to use on a "limited input, limited output" device like AppleTV or iPhone. I think the name "Mac OS X" will be reserved for distributions which include all the bells and whistles, like full-size Mail, iCal, iChat, Automator, Time Machine, Quicktime...
     

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