U.S. Government to Explicitly Allow iPhone Jailbreaking

TSX

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Oct 1, 2008
2,611
22
Texas
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38413597/ns/technology_and_science-wireless/


New gov't rules allow unapproved iPhone apps
By Joelle Tessler
Owners of the iPhone will be able to break electronic locks on their devices in order to download applications that have not been approved by Apple. The government is making that legal under new rules announced Monday.

The decision to allow the practice commonly known as "jailbreaking" is one of a handful of new exemptions from a federal law that prohibits the circumvention of technical measures that control access to copyrighted works. Every three years, the Library of Congress authorizes such exemptions to ensure that existing law does not prevent non-infringing use of copyrighted material.

Another exemption will allow owners of used cell phones to break access controls on their phones in order to switch wireless carriers.
 

jayhawk11

macrumors 6502a
Oct 19, 2007
768
249
It's always been legal. It's just a breach of the SLA. In other words, they can void your warranty if you jailbreak.
 

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Apr 12, 2001
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U.S. Government to Explicitly Allow iPhone Jailbreaking



The Associated Press briefly reports that the U.S. government has defined new rules that will permit users to "jailbreak" their iPhone and skirt Apple's App Store ecosystem to add unapproved third-party applications.
Owners of the iPhone will be able to break electronic locks on their devices in order to download applications that have not been approved by Apple. The government is making that legal under new rules announced Monday.

The decision to allow the practice commonly known as "jailbreaking" is one of a handful of new exemptions from a federal law that prohibits the circumvention of technical measures that control access to copyrighted works.
While it is not uncommon for users to jailbreak their devices, the practice is officially unsanctioned by Apple. The company maintains a support document outlining some of the issues users of jailbroken iOS devices may experience while also disclosing that Apple reserves the right to deny service for any such device due to the "unauthorized modification" being a violation of the license agreement. Under the new federal policies, it would appear that Apple is no longer permitted to deny service for such reasons under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, although the company could likely still argue that the device's Terms of Use allow it to deny service.

Article Link: U.S. Government to Explicitly Allow iPhone Jailbreaking
 

AlphaBob

macrumors regular
Jan 28, 2008
193
0
Rhode Island
Require AT&T Unlock after contract ends...

And the next step is that unlock codes should be required by law after the subsidy contract expires.

For many phones this is the case, but not the iPhone.

The lack of unlock codes after the end of contracts makes it very hard to easy that AT&T is acting as a Monopoly.
 

Spanky Deluxe

macrumors 601
Mar 17, 2005
4,856
387
London, UK
Although I've never jailbroken any of my iPhones, I think this is really good news. Ever since the iPad came out I've always had a nagging memory of John Titor's claims of locked down computers in the future - that mixed with people saying the iPad's OS is the future made for an uncomfortable image. To have it down in law that jailbreaking is perfectly legal and running whatever you want on your devices could be a valuable safe guard for computer use liberties in the future.
 

kas23

macrumors 603
Oct 28, 2007
5,626
291
This would actually make the iPhone hands down the best cellphone out there. Apple should have definitely seen this coming and wonder what their response will be. I really hope they don't see this as a negative thing because it's not.
 

Stella

macrumors G3
Apr 21, 2003
8,321
4,778
Canada
Excellent decision.

Although I've never jailbroken any of my iPhones, I think this is really good news. Ever since the iPad came out I've always had a nagging memory of John Titor's claims of locked down computers in the future
The John Titor story would make an greatmovie.
 

rKunda

macrumors 65816
Jul 14, 2008
1,240
93
I jailbreak, though I don't mind Apple's policy—to an extent. This isn't a job for the government.
 

Ashyukun

macrumors 6502
Jul 19, 2008
262
1
The real question though is whether or not this can in any way keep Apple from continuing to try and find ways to modify the hardware/firmware to keep people from Jailbreaking their devices. Unfortunately I'm betting it won't change that particular aspect of things too much...
 

wesk702

macrumors 68000
Jul 7, 2007
1,804
356
The hood
psshhh... government. Exactly what power do they have?

I’ll believe it when I see it.
sounds to good to be true at the moment.
 

atari1356

macrumors 68000
Feb 27, 2004
1,582
32
Wow... I'm not quite sure what to make of this.

While I'm all for people being able to use devices they've purchased in whatever way they choose, Apple has some good reasons for their so called "walled garden".

Will this government sanctioning of jailbreaking make it more mainstream? And make piracy more mainstream? And make those devices more of a target for viruses/malware? :confused::eek: