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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee today approved the bipartisan Open App Markets Act, an antitrust bill that would allow for alternative app stores and alternative in-app payment systems on the iPhone. The bill will now head to the Senate floor for a vote.

iOS-App-Store-General-Feature-JoeBlue.jpg

Apple had urged the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee to reject the bill, arguing that sideloading would pose privacy and security risks for customers.

"Sideloading would enable bad actors to evade Apple's privacy and security protections by distributing apps without critical privacy and security checks. These provisions would allow malware, scams and data-exploitation to proliferate," said Apple's government affairs head Tim Powderly in a letter sent to the Committee earlier this week.

Last month, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee approved the American Innovation and Choice Online Act, another antitrust bill that would allow sideloading and which Apple spoke out against, citing the same privacy and security risks.



Article Link: U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Approves Another Antitrust Bill That Would Allow Sideloading on iPhone
 
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This is just sad. Third-party app stores sound like a great way to get the malware. Say goodbye to privacy and security. :(

Our privacy will be on the line and we will be exposed to the malware. I really hope Apple will find a way to stop this. The government should really stay out of this.
 

genovelle

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,651
1,973


The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee today approved the bipartisan Open Markets Act, an antitrust bill that would allow for sideloading and alternate app stores. The bill will now head to the Senate floor for a vote.

iOS-App-Store-General-Feature-JoeBlue.jpg

Apple had urged the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee to reject the bill, arguing that sideloading would pose privacy and security risks for customers.

More details to follow…

Article Link: U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Approves Another Antitrust Bill That Would Allow Sideloading
This is going to force Apple to stop investing heavily into the App Store. They should tell these congressmen the unvarnished truth. If they decrease profitability of their platform they will stop investing in it or start charging all developers for access whether their app is free or not based on the number of Apple API calls per month. Many of the small developers will close and the Epics and Microsofts of the world will be able to charge what they want because they won’t have to compete with the little guys anymore. It’ll be like the old days for them. Just what they want.
 

dguisinger

macrumors 65816
Jul 25, 2002
1,061
2,054
This is going to force Apple to stop investing heavily into the App Store. They should tell these congressmen the unvarnished truth. If they decrease profitability of their platform they will stop investing in it or start charging all developers for access whether their app is free or not based on the number of Apple API calls per month. Many of the small developers will close and the Epics and Microsofts of the world will be able to charge what they want because they won’t have to compete with the little guys anymore. It’ll be like the old days for them. Just what they want.

They are investing heavily into the App store now? What innovations has it had in the last 10 years? Better yet, have they improved their working relationships with developers who got a run around on why they were getting rejected? Last I heard, developers are still getting rejected for things as stupid as someone at Apple typed in the wrong username/password for the test account the developer gave them, and instead of trying again, they reject the app update. Or how about all the fake scam apps that look like the originals they are trying to dupe people into subscribing for? We know they exist, there are stories about them almost every week. Innovation wise, the App Store in my opinion has been a failure. They just milk the gullible for all they are worth before these laws get implemented.
 

jz0309

Contributor
Sep 25, 2018
5,700
16,008
Temecula, CA
This is just sad. Third-party app stores sound like a great way to get the malware. Say goodbye to privacy and security. :(

Our privacy will be on the line and we will be exposed to the malware. I really hope Apple will find a way to stop this. The government should really stay out of this.
Remember this next time you vote
 

Amazing Iceman

macrumors 601
Nov 8, 2008
4,591
2,756
Florida, U.S.A.
This is just sad. Third-party app stores sound like a great way to get the malware. Say goodbye to privacy and security. :(

Our privacy will be on the line and we will be exposed to the malware. I really hope Apple will find a way to stop this. The government should really stay out of this.
If this is happening, I want to be able to Sideload to a Tesla, Prius, Mazda, Ecobee, etc.

I want to be able to install whatever firmware I want on my vehicles and devices without voiding my warranty.
 

Spock

macrumors 68030
Jan 6, 2002
2,885
5,142
Vulcan
I think what Apple will need to do is limit access to the core of iOS that third parties are able to access. A litter-box separated from the house that can be easily cleaned of crap when needed. Now, to play devils advocate.. The ability to do whatever you want on iOS like Android may be an undocumented selling point. Now I will be able to have emulators and things like that on my iPhone that Apple blocks.
 

el-John-o

macrumors 68000
Nov 29, 2010
1,566
740
Missouri
Apple's privacy and security arguments are valid; but the motivation for making the argument is profit. They want to control the experience to keep extracting their fees.

Apple's publisher fees are a fraction of what fees were for traditional software publishing back in the day. When a publisher would take 50-60%, or even more, for software that was sold in boxes and distributed through retailers. And the retailer still got their cut! Selling a piece of software for $30 and making a couple of bucks for each copy wasn't uncommon. When the App store was first released, that 30% cut was celebrated. And that's what happens. People get used to it, and then want more.

I find myself fairly torn. This is Apple's platform that they've built. Is it a monopoly? Kind of? Except that there really is healthy competition. Consumers can choose excellent Android devices that allow sideloading. Even jailbreaking has significantly lost interest to consumers. Consumers don't appear to be foaming at the mouth to sideload apps; though many would if given the opportunity.

My biggest concern from a consumer standpoint is that all of the businesses demanding "choice" now won't offer it to consumers once one of these goes through. Once Apple can no longer force companies to use the App store for purchases, we may be back to the way things used to be. You had to go to a specific website to buy a specific app and download it. Apps in the app store may actually STOP allowing IAP, and force consumers to another site when you click the button to buy through a third party processor that charges less. Not all apps will do this; plenty will recognize that the convenience of the app store drives up sales. But big apps like Netflix and others will; because there's enough consumer demand that consumers will be willing to go through that extra step. Consumers won't even be given the choice of using the App stores own payment processing.
 

el-John-o

macrumors 68000
Nov 29, 2010
1,566
740
Missouri
I think what Apple will need to do is limit access to the core of iOS that third parties are able to access. A litter-box separated from the house that can be easily cleaned of crap when needed. Now, to play devils advocate.. The ability to do whatever you want on iOS like Android may be an undocumented selling point. Now I will be able to have emulators and things like that on my iPhone that Apple blocks.
Yep.

Would LOVE to be able to install emulators on my M1 iPad Pro. Or, if such access were granted; the ability to sideload macOS onto an M1 iPad Pro! (A guy can dream!)
 

FNH15

macrumors 6502a
Apr 19, 2011
659
663
One time where I’m glad Manchin & Sinema don’t vote as Democrats.
I’d expect this to face stiff opposition in the Senate.

If one wants a subpar experience with gaping security holes, there’s a robot-named OS by another company based in CA...
 

4jasontv

Suspended
Jul 31, 2011
6,272
7,523
They are investing heavily into the App store now? What innovations has it had in the last 10 years? Better yet, have they improved their working relationships with developers who got a run around on why they were getting rejected? Last I heard, developers are still getting rejected for things as stupid as someone at Apple typed in the wrong username/password for the test account the developer gave them, and instead of trying again, they reject the app update. Or how about all the fake scam apps that look like the originals they are trying to dupe people into subscribing for? We know they exist, there are stories about them almost every week. Innovation wise, the App Store in my opinion has been a failure. They just milk the gullible for all they are worth before these laws get implemented.
Yeah! And why haven’t we seen innovation from Walmart either. What’s up with that? What has Walmart done to stock more defective items and exclude low cost versions of brand name products? Walmart retail, in my opinion has been a failure. They just milk the gullible for all they are worth.
 
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