U2 Manager speaks out

Discussion in 'iPod' started by tingly, Jan 29, 2008.

  1. tingly macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    #1
    U2's manager gave a speech for MIDEM on internet music piracy. Here's excerpts from a very long speech.

    "I quote from Josh Tyrangiel in Time Magazine, 'The smartest thing would be for the majors to collaborate on the creation of the ultimate digital-distribution hub, a place where every band can sell its wares at the price point of its choosing'. Apple’s iTunes, despite its current dominance is vulnerable. Consumers dislike its incompatibility with other music services, and the labels are rebelling against its insistence on controlling prices. Universal the largest label in the world has declined to sign a long term deal with iTunes. 'There’s a real urgency for the labels to get together and figure this out,” says Rick Rubin of Columbia Records.'”

    "Personally I expect that Apple will before too long reveal a wireless iPod that connects to an iTunes 'all of the music, wherever you are' subscription service. I would like it to succeed, if the content is fairly paid for. 'Access' is what people will be paying for in the future, not the 'ownership' of digital copies of pieces of music."

    "I have met Steve Jobs and even done a deal with him face to face in his kitchen in Palo Alto in 2004. No one there but Steve, Bono, Jimmy Iovine [of Interscope Records] and me, and Lucian Grainge [of Universal Records] was on the phone. We made the deal for the U2 iPod and wrote it down in the back of my diary. We approved the use of the music in TV commercials for iTunes and the iPod and in return got a royalty on the hardware. Those were the days when iTunes was being talked about as penicillin for the recorded music industry."

    "I wish [Steve Jobs] would bring his remarkable set of skills to bear on the problems of recorded music. He’s a technologist, a financial genius, a marketer and a music lover. He probably doesn’t realize it but the collapse of the old financial model for recorded music will also mean the end of the songwriter. We’ve been used to bands who wrote their own material since the Beatles, but the mechanical royalties [for manufacture of a recording for sale] that sustain songwriters are drying up. Labels and artists, songwriters and publishers, producers and musicians, everyone’s a victim."

    "Universal – U2’s label - recently struck a deal with Microsoft that sees it receive a cut of the revenues generated by sales of the Zune MP3 player. It’s unfortunate that the Zune hasn’t attracted the sort of consumer support that the iPod did. We need more competition."

    "Under the agreement, Universal receives $1 for every Zune sold. When you consider Radio Shack sells Zune players for $150 you’ll see that Universal has asked for less than 1% of revenue - for a company that is supplying about a third of the US market’s chart music at the moment. This isn’t really enough, but it’s a start, I suppose and follows from the U2/Apple deal, the principle that the hardware makers should share with the content owners whose assets are exploited by the buyers of their machines."

    He goes on to say that the record industry should give ISP's a cut of the music business, financial motivation to prevent their customers' illegal music downloads.
     
  2. Mac-Xpert macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #2
    I don't see this happening. Songwriters will always remain, because the motivation to write songs isn't just about the money they could potentially earn with it. It's also about creative expression.

    Also I think the distribution model may change (going to online sales only) and maybe the record companies will disappear. But music and songwriters will surely remain.

    Yeah it sure is, for Microsoft and Universal :p

    I think it's crazy that Universal gets any money at all for a musicplayer being sold. Who says that if I would own such player that I would play Universal releases on it? And if I already bought the CD why should Universal get anymore money from me (indirectly) because I want to transfer my CDs to MP3 and play it on a MP3 player?:confused:
     
  3. Tilpots macrumors 601

    Tilpots

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Carolina Beach, NC
    #3
    I find myself somewhat agreeing with this point. If we could pay a flat monthly fee, say $10-$15 a month and have TOTAL ACCESS (rights to play, share, and distribute) to ALL of the music EVERY studio currently has control, I'd be a lot happier with the music industry. I don't need to own a song, I just want to hear it where I want, when I want. In my car, on my computer, ipod, and in the shower, it's music, and it's meant to be heard, not owned or possesed.

    We've got a long way to go here, and a bunchy of greedy capitalists in our way. How we get there, I have no idea. But "Access" is the key and until we figure it out, no company or consumer will be completely happy.
     
  4. Mac-Xpert macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #4
    I think the problem with a subscription service is that you'll NEVER have "total access". How will you be able to transfer you DRM to every device you would like to listen your music on? And what if for instance if you like to go to a friend and let him hear a new album/artist that you just discovered and he doesn't have a subscription or a compatible device.

    The only way you will have "total access" is with old fashioned CDs. It's a standard and it works on everything, all the time.

    As long as they'll keep making those I will stay away from any DRM-ed files or get any kind of subscription service.
     
  5. tingly thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
  6. Tilpots macrumors 601

    Tilpots

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Carolina Beach, NC
    #6
    I hear what you're saying and agree, if you don't have an access device then there's no way you could connect. However, I do believe access devices will become more and more available. And I'm certainly not talking tomorrow or the day after. Whether they're WiFi or cellular, or a combo, it seems all devices will eventually be able to connect to external sources. Password protection would allow the sharing capabilities, regardless if the owner of the device had the subscription or not.

    Nothing would have any DRM protection because you would never actually have the song. You only access and stream (for lack of a better word) the music of your choosing. I'm just throwing this out there. There's no basis or science, just pondering what might occur down the road.
     

Share This Page