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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Uber_App_Icon-250x250.jpg
Uber today introduced a new feature for its iOS app that allows drivers to provide feedback when giving a rider a rating of less than five stars.

As outlined by The Verge, drivers are now asked "what went wrong" when providing a four star rating or lower. Drivers can then choose from reasons like wait time, patience, number of riders, attitude, wanted a new route, or other.

Riders who continue to receive much of the same feedback from multiple drivers may receive a notification from Uber letting them know about the low ratings and the reason behind them.

Uber is also changing the way its UberPool service works in an effort to make the feature less stressful for drivers. UberPool allows passengers to choose a cheaper fare, but it's a shared ride with the potential for several passenger pickups.

For UberPool rides, drivers will now receive an additional flat fare for each passenger picked up, and Uber says it is planning to pay much of the added cost for the trips through a service fee reduction. Riders will not pay more for a trip even if there are additional pickups.

Uber in June launched a "180 Days of Change" initiative designed to improve working conditions for its drivers and bolster its public image, and today's changes are part of that effort. Uber has been introducing new driver features since then, starting with a long-desired in-app tipping option.

Article Link: Uber Adding Feature to Let Drivers Provide More Rider Feedback
 

hortod1

macrumors 6502
Jan 26, 2009
381
886
Yeah, how about an option to only select DRIVERS with 4.5 average stars or better, knowing how many rides they've given in the last hour, how long they've been on the clock (to gauge driver fatigue) how many tickets and/or accidents they've had in, say the last 12 months?
 
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TheMountainLife

macrumors regular
May 24, 2015
136
118
Yeah, how about an option to only select DRIVERS with 4.5 average stars or better, knowing how many rides they've given in the last hour, how long they've been on the clock (to gauge driver fatigue) how many tickets and/or accidents they've had in, say the last 12 months?

This means nothing when thousands of unqualified/distracted drivers are still operating vehicles around you.
 

rhett7660

macrumors G5
Jan 9, 2008
13,066
3,031
Sunny, Southern California
I understand why the feature exists to let drivers rate riders, but it does feel strange when riders PAY to get judged.

Pretty much. Have you ever perused the Uber forums. Some of the folks on those sites are stating if the ride is less than a 10 minute trip, they give the riders one or two stars. WTF!

I have actually curtailed my use of Uber since I have been reading their forums, been using Lyft a lot more these days.
 

thisisnotmyname

macrumors 68020
Oct 22, 2014
2,428
5,179
known but velocity indeterminate
Pretty much. Have you ever perused the Uber forums. Some of the folks on those sites are stating if the ride is less than a 10 minute trip, they give the riders one or two stars. WTF!

I have actually curtailed my use of Uber since I have been reading their forums, been using Lyft a lot more these days.

Drivers who engage in that sort of behavior should be removed from Uber. I've heard from drivers that some call you in advance of picking up just to ask what your destination is so that they can cancel the ride before fully accepting it if it's too short. That's ridiculous. I, like most people I'm sure, have a mixture of shorter and longer rides; I shouldn't have to wonder if a driver will refuse service because the current ride isn't as long as they would like.
 
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miniyou64

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2008
723
2,661
Pretty much. Have you ever perused the Uber forums. Some of the folks on those sites are stating if the ride is less than a 10 minute trip, they give the riders one or two stars. WTF!

I have actually curtailed my use of Uber since I have been reading their forums, been using Lyft a lot more these days.

How is this exclusive to Uber though and not also a problem with Lyft?
 

rhett7660

macrumors G5
Jan 9, 2008
13,066
3,031
Sunny, Southern California
How is this exclusive to Uber though and not also a problem with Lyft?

I don't know if it is, but I have yet to read or hear about it when I go to their forums. So that is what I am basing it on. They might be the same, I don't know, but I haven't heard of it with Lyft, yet.

You can go visit their forums if you like. There is quite a few posts about this. Again, I haven't seen anything on Lyft, yet, but I haven't been to their forum or read any blogs in a few months regarding Lyft employees so that may have changed also.

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Drivers who engage in that sort of behavior should be removed from Uber. I've heard from drivers that some call you in advance of picking up just to ask what your destination is so that they can cancel the ride before fully accepting it if it's too short. That's ridiculous. I, like most people I'm sure, have a mixture of shorter and longer rides; I shouldn't have to wonder if a driver will refuse service because the current ride isn't as long as they would like.

We had a few of our friends comment on this when they were in NY. The driver would cancel or call and then cancel. One of the questions was, are you sure that is the only place you want to go? Or are you sure, you can walk or take the subway. They didn't us Lyft in NY so I don't know if they are the same way or different.

I haven't experienced this yet with Uber, but after reading over their forums and then going back and looking over my rating, I can see them marking me down for the short trip. But the rating doesn't tell me who rated me low.

I am like you, I mix it up a lot. From 20-30 minute rides, to rides right down the street. Especially on a Friday or Saturday night.
 
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Bigsk8r

macrumors 6502
Nov 28, 2011
341
592
Austin, Texas
As a full time engineer and part time Uber and Lyft driver (yes, they have the feedback feature too), I find the ability to comment on especially bad riders is useful. Like anything though, there are drivers who will abuse it.

Likewise, there are riders who regularly already abuse my time by making me wait 3 - 5 minutes after I arrive which is generally 1 - 2 minutes after the system texted them that I was close by. To say nothing of the riders that select UberPOOL or Lyft Line, then act like babies when they aren't the next one dropped off. Then there are the total drunks...

I am a rider for my engineering job and a driver part time. 10 - 20% each of riders and drivers just suck. That's life.

Full disclosure:

Lyft - 53 trips, 4.9 stars
Uber - 406 trips, 4.93 stars
Vehicle - 2013 Lexus ES 300h

And yes, I do think my vehicle puts people in a better mood the moment I pull up, so I do have it easier. If a clean cut, professional driver picked you up in a Lexus that is washed and vacuumed each driving day, I think you would be happier too...
 

coolbeep

Suspended
Jan 13, 2012
45
39
Atlanta, Georgia
Yes! Thank you! I had been driving for uber for a couple of years and I had been contacting their support (impossible to get a hold of) about rider ratings (among other things I'm glad they're adding now). I've had rude drunk people yelling racist s**t out my window at other people, or spilling their food everywhere after telling them "no food," even riders blaming me because THEY put in the wrong destination address, and stinky people. These changes are welcome. Yes there are crappy uber drivers and it would be nice to have more driver info too. But in my experience, our driving standards are really low. So you could have a top notch driver, and still get hit by a terrible driver who was more concerned for whats on their phone. To me, its our easy-to-pass driving tests that are the real problem.

ps I didn't give low ratings for short rides. Only if you had me waiting for a long time or smelled bad. But I see how drivers could abuse this new feature. Honestly, they're just mad about the continuous pay cuts from uber. I was too. (We have our own "Uber driver" forum too)
 
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Bigsk8r

macrumors 6502
Nov 28, 2011
341
592
Austin, Texas
When you are offering a service to the public it is not unreasonable to be required to give information that would normally be private.

Then you should have no issue with the full address of both your origination and destination as well as your full riding history being visible in advance. If you want to choose your car and driver, they should get to choose whether to pick you up or not.
 

miniyou64

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2008
723
2,661
Is safety not a concern of yours?
[doublepost=1506470339][/doublepost]
strange you need to ask. look it up.

Strange I need to ask? I dont support unionized monopolies if thats what you’re refereing to. Uber might be the best service I’ve ever used. And thats saying something. So no I won’t be deleting it any time soon.
 

jlc1978

macrumors 68040
Aug 14, 2009
3,915
2,347
Then you should have no issue with the full address of both your origination and destination as well as your full riding history being visible in advance. If you want to choose your car and driver, they should get to choose whether to pick you up or not.

I'm not the one offering a public service. Uber needs to provide the service on a non-discriminatory basis as well as ensure their customers of a safe ride. Drivers already have that because Uber knows who the rider is, but the rider has no idea of the driver's history.

If Uber could prevent drivers from refusing short trips or to less desirable locations then I have no issue with providing a destination; but my impression is drivers would simply ignore trips they don't want which would negatively impact public's perception of the service. If Uber would assign drivers and cutoff those who refuse or cancel trips I'm OK with that as it would weed out the bad customer service drivers; and if a driver consistently gives low scores to short trips cut them off as well.

As for ride history, beyond a rider's rating the history has no bearing on whether or not to pick me up other than it being another way to discriminate against riders.

Yea, short trips may suck but you can always stop driving. I think it will get worse for drivers now that you can compare prices and order a Lift or Uber within mapping apps; further driving down prices.
 

Bigsk8r

macrumors 6502
Nov 28, 2011
341
592
Austin, Texas
I'm not the one offering a public service. Uber needs to provide the service on a non-discriminatory basis as well as ensure their customers of a safe ride. Drivers already have that because Uber knows who the rider is, but the rider has no idea of the driver's history.

If Uber could prevent drivers from refusing short trips or to less desirable locations then I have no issue with providing a destination; but my impression is drivers would simply ignore trips they don't want which would negatively impact public's perception of the service. If Uber would assign drivers and cutoff those who refuse or cancel trips I'm OK with that as it would weed out the bad customer service drivers; and if a driver consistently gives low scores to short trips cut them off as well.

As for ride history, beyond a rider's rating the history has no bearing on whether or not to pick me up other than it being another way to discriminate against riders.

Yea, short trips may suck but you can always stop driving. I think it will get worse for drivers now that you can compare prices and order a Lift or Uber within mapping apps; further driving down prices.

1 - It's not a public service. Public services are subsidized by the government. This isn't.

2 - The driver has to pass a background check, provide insurance documents, pay for any other state required processes like fingerprinting, and maintain a vehicle in safe operating order.

3 - The rider has the option of sitting directly behind me where I cannot see them and could not respond to a dangerous action even if I saw it coming. Your claim that the rider is the one more at risk is completely baseless.

4 - As a private contractor for the company, I WILL choose who does and does not get in my car. Now, I have never turned anyone away that wasn't falling down, ready to puke or pass out drunk, but still. My car. My choice.

5 - Both companies keep metrics on cancelled rides and pay attention to it for various reasons. Refusing rides regularly would gain you negative attention and get you thrown off the service in a fairly short amount of time if it were habitual.

If you don't like drivers being able to say negative things about you, be an on-time, respectful rider. Or wait on the bus.

It'll be around.

Eventually.
 

jlc1978

macrumors 68040
Aug 14, 2009
3,915
2,347
1 - It's not a public service. Public services are subsidized by the government. This isn't.

You are offering a service to the public, just like a cab, bakery or any other of a myriad of companies.

2 - The driver has to pass a background check, provide insurance documents, pay for any other state required processes like fingerprinting, and maintain a vehicle in safe operating order.

That's a good start, and ride sharing companies should (and may already) do regular rechecks was well.

3 - The rider has the option of sitting directly behind me where I cannot see them and could not respond to a dangerous action even if I saw it coming. Your claim that the rider is the one more at risk is completely baseless.
Hardly. Uber knows who I am whereas I have no idea who you are; although I can run your tag before you pick me up, in theory at least. Actually, sounds like a good idea for an app - KnowUrDriver that lets you run a tag and get info on the driver.

4 - As a private contractor for the company, I WILL choose who does and does not get in my car. Now, I have never turned anyone away that wasn't falling down, ready to puke or pass out drunk, but still. My car. My choice.

As someone who is offering a service to the public you could find yourself at odds with various laws; just like any business that discriminates. I have no issue with drivers not wanting drunks in their car but refusing to pickup legitimate riders and taking them to their destination is problematic.

5 - Both companies keep metrics on cancelled rides and pay attention to it for various reasons. Refusing rides regularly would gain you negative attention and get you thrown off the service in a fairly short amount of time if it were habitual.
As they should.

If you don't like drivers being able to say negative things about you, be an on-time, respectful rider. Or wait on the bus.

I have no issues with drivers commenting on riders, or riders providing negative comments on drivers. Heck, an app that tracks drivers by car tags would also be a good way to get independent feedback.

I've never had a problem with Uber or Lyft and use whichever is cheaper at the moment, other than the occasional driver who had no idea where tehy were going and use Waze to route them through endless neighborhoods or play music during the ride; and provide feedback as appropriate to the experience.
 

noisycats

macrumors 6502a
Jun 1, 2010
772
864
The 'ham. Alabama.
As a frequent user of both, more Lyft lately than Uber, most drivers seem to drive for both (economics, I get it). I have yet to meet ONE driver that prefers Uber or Lyft. And that's based on over 30 drivers as of this weekend.

Seems Uber should be adding a feature to let drivers provide more Uber feedback.
 

hortod1

macrumors 6502
Jan 26, 2009
381
886
Let me guess, privacy isn't a concern of yours?

I’ll give you extra points for an effective use of the non sequitur.

This has noting to do with privacy, or lack thereof. It has to do with safety. Would you get on an airliner if you knew the pilots had fewer than 10 hours of uninterrupted rest before their duty day began? The answer is No, you wouldn’t, because duty days and rest periods are federally regulated. Additionally random drug and alcohol testing is the norm. And in the corporate aviation world, there are companies like Argus and Wyvern that keep track of pilot incidents, accidents, and violations - and passengers can specifically request pilots with clean records.

And it’s not just the USA on this one - with few exceptions, professional pilots cannot fly into Canada if they have a DUI or drug conviction on their record.

So with all of that in mind, are all of these safety protections a violation of my privacy?
 
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