UK Copyright Laws

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by bandofbrothers, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. bandofbrothers macrumors 601

    bandofbrothers

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    Uk
    #1
    Hi ,


    Just seen this on the Uk news channels.

    Apparantly if you purchase a music Cd from a retail store and then import it onto your mp player you are actually infringing the copyright laws !
     
  2. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Location:
    Hogtown
    #2
    not in Canada ... our laws allow you to do this
     
  3. bandofbrothers thread starter macrumors 601

    bandofbrothers

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    Uk
    #3
    I could understand it if you were playing the music cd to the public at a venue but not if you were playing it through headphones or a dock for your own use.

    Although it's in the news here I can't see how it could be enforced !
     
  4. AdrianK, Aug 3, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2011

    AdrianK macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    #4
    It's true for DVDs, mainly because they're encrypted to prevent copying (unlike CDs), but quite honestly; who cares?


    Exactly, it can't be. Going back to the DVD comparison, some guy reported himself to an anti piracy group for decrypting his own DVDs, they didn't do anything :p

    Quite honestly, anti-piracy groups only really care about major distributors of warez, the warez scene is their main target.
     
  5. OllyW Moderator

    OllyW

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Location:
    The Black Country, England
    #5
    It's in the news because they are going to update the laws to allow ripping of CDs and DVDs for personal use. The current copyright laws were written years ago and have been outdated by technological change.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14372698
     
  6. saving107 macrumors 603

    saving107

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    San Jose, Ca
    #6
    I've heard this argument from the RIAA before.

    By current laws, its also illegal to burn yourself a copy of your own disc for use in your car stereo.

    the RIAA is pathetic and this law (in the US) needs to change.
     
  7. JetBlack7 macrumors 68020

    JetBlack7

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    Location:
    Portugal
    #7
    Nowadays there are ridiculous laws for everything.
     
  8. boss.king macrumors 68040

    boss.king

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    #8
    I agree, they're scum. I mean, that thing back in 2006 where they sued a Russian music-download site for $1.65 trillion (they calculated they had lost $150 000 PER SONG) It's almost as though they don't want to be taken seriously
     
  9. maril1111 macrumors 68000

    maril1111

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Location:
    Denmark
    #9
    Yeh but thats because most laws were written a long time ago and since than not really updated with the flow, sure these laws made sense a few years ago but nobody has looked at them since as they are too focused trying to catch pirates online
     
  10. saving107 macrumors 603

    saving107

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    San Jose, Ca
    #10
    What do you mean?

    I don't find these ridiculous :rolleyes:

    http://www.dumblaws.com/
     
  11. boss.king macrumors 68040

    boss.king

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    #11
    Haha. I love things like that (even though most of them are actually obscure interpretations of laws put in place for other purposes)
     
  12. saving107, Aug 3, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2011

    saving107 macrumors 603

    saving107

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    San Jose, Ca
    #12
    Its just a fun read.

    Edit:


    It took me a while, but I found a link to a story from this mornings MacBreak Weekly that I thought was interesting.

    The basic story is that Amazon approached this developer and told him that they wanted to Feature his app in Amazon's app store, but that he had to agree to give away his app and not collect any profits for that 1 day, the developer agreed and during its 1 day promotion saw downloads jump from (average) 19 downloads per day to over 100,000. Now he is claiming that his company lost over $54,800+ in revenue.

    [​IMG]

    My point is that this developer had low downloads to begin with, and after a 1 day promotion with no profits is arguing that he's lost $54,000 in revenue. But with the way his app was selling at first, how can he claim a value was lost?

    the same goes for the RIAA, how can they claim a lost revenue from pirated music?

    https://shiftyjelly.wordpress.com/2011/08/02/amazon-app-store-rotten-to-the-core/
     
  13. JetBlack7 macrumors 68020

    JetBlack7

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    Location:
    Portugal
    #13
    What I mean is that I agree with the hole "no to piracy" thing since I buy my songs via iTunes, bu if you buy a cd and want to transfer those songs to your iPod since the Walkman fad has passed years ago, is it a crime? You paid for the cd and can't pass them over to your iPhone/iPod?
     
  14. saving107 macrumors 603

    saving107

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    San Jose, Ca
    #14
    I know what you meant, I was just trying to be funny :)
     
  15. JetBlack7 macrumors 68020

    JetBlack7

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    Location:
    Portugal
    #15
    M'kay ;)
     
  16. boss.king macrumors 68040

    boss.king

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    #16
    It amazes me what people think they can get away with
     
  17. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #17
    I wonder if this also extends to Blu-Ray?

    If personal backups/copying are to be a right, should the media companies be forced to offer unlock-keys to enable this? At the very least, it should imply that the US DMCA (forbidding decryption) should be unenforceable here.
     
  18. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    Fighting to stay in the EU
    #18
    Yeah some bits of the law definitely need to change. Transferring (I heard this described as "side-"something in the past) my files from format to another should be completely legal.

    But equally it should be illegal if I own an old copy of an album or game, to then download a newer version that has been remastered or upgraded. That kind of entitlement is just plain silly.
     
  19. OllyW Moderator

    OllyW

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Location:
    The Black Country, England
    #19
    Wouldn't that make iTunes Match illegal?
     
  20. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #20
    I agree... although to an extent the media companies bring this sort of entitlement mentality on themselves.

    When you buy a DVD, the consumer sees the transaction as one of ownership... but the media company sees it as licensing to view.

    As an owner of a DVD, I wouldn't expect Bly-ray resolution from my purchase. As a person licensing a movie for viewing though, perhaps I should have some expectation that the licensor would give me some discounted access to a superior mastering if technology advances made that possible?
     
  21. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Location:
    Scotland
    #21
    I'm in the UK and I do make copies of CD's, but it is perfectly legal to make personal 'fair-use' archival backups. CD's get scratched, so I back them up. Simples.
     
  22. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #22
    No. Please read the original article.

    There is no 'fair-use' justification for copying at the moment in the UK, and this new law seeks to change that.
     
  23. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Bath, United Kingdom
    #23
    I think you have got hold of the wrong end of the story here…
    The proposed new law will change the existing outdated law.
    Read the article…
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14372698
     
  24. The Phazer macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    London, UK
    #24
    Nope. Why would it? iTunes Match has the permission from the copyright owners.

    Very unlikely. Bear in mind that there's precident for this too - making a copy of a television broadcast to allow it to be watched at a more convenient time has been allowed since 1988, but you're not allowed to break any encryption to do it - and hence if you want to record films broadcast on Sky Box-Office movies where they use macrovision and do-not-record HDCP flags you're out of luck.

    You're allowed to write to the Secretary of State and ask for a one off exemption to this, but the reality is none have ever been granted.

    So I very much doubt this will allow you to bypass encryption. And companies will still be able to block it technically by all means neccessary. Which also means you won't be able to rip the vast majority of DVD's legally either...

    No it isn't. It's legal in the UK to create one copy of a computer program for backup purposes, but *only* a computer program and not digitally stored media. There's no suggestion that that will change in the current proposals either (though again, the format shifting proposal is very vague).

    Phazer
     
  25. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
    Flea Bottom, King's Landing
    #25
    Maybe it's because I'm from the Independent Republic of Texas (yes, I've seceded from the Union:D), but the Cowboy boot law makes sense to me. Death to posers. You're not a real cowboy until you've stepped in cow sh...;) Cowboy boots are functional, not fashionable. Stupid posers.:mad: There otta be a law.:p Oh wait there is.:D:D:D
     

Share This Page