Understanding "Quit" in Lion...

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by aross99, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. aross99 macrumors 68000

    aross99

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    #1
    It's taken me a bit to realize what is going on with the "Quit" command (CMD-Q) in an application running under Lion. It certainly doesn't function as we are used to, and for me it created quite a bit of confusion.

    Forgive my simplification here...

    Quitting an Application in Lion is really more like "hiding" an application. For all practical purposes, when you quit, the application and all of it's windows are gone. This part looks just like it always has.

    What is different is if you relaunch that application again, it doesn't launch fresh, but it "reveals" itself with all of the windows that were open when you used "quit".

    Note, that I am not talking about just the new applications from Apple that take advantage of things like the Versions and Resume capabilities, I am talking about legacy apps like Office 2008.

    So lets say you want to work on a Word document: You double click on the document and it opens. You make your changes, save it with CMD-S and then Quit with CMD-Q. So far so good - things work just like they always did.

    Now lets day tomorrow, you need to work on another document, so you double click on the second document. Word launches as normal, but you see not only the document you double-clicked on, but also any other document that was open when you last quit Word.

    In general, I guess we shouldn't be using CMD-Q, when we are finished with a document, we should be CLOSING THE WINDOW (CMD-W?). THis way you don't leave windows open when you are finished with an application, and you relaunch it.

    It makes sense, I guess, but I wasn't expecting anything like this.

    Here are a couple of other examples, I ran into with this:

    Double Click on an image on your desktop and look at it in Preview (I know you can use Quick view, but bear with me...). CMD-Q when you are done, and then later double click on another image. Now you have two open. Seems like we are going to have to retrain ourselves to use CMD-W to close windows and forget about CMD-Q, unless we want to "suspend" all of the open windows for now? Seems like a much less likely used function, but maybe I am just too old school...

    One more:

    Say you are searching for something on the web, and you have a number of windows open with tabs, etc. When you are done, you quit Safari with CMD-Q. See where I am going with this? When I come back tomorrow and relaunch Safari? Boom - all of my windows are open again, even though I am done with them.

    I need to retrain my brain to use CMD-W and not CMD-Q...

    Now a more technical question: What happens if I have a misbehaving app that I would normally just quit and relaunch (like Safari)? Lets say Flash is kind of wacky and is making your fans run, etc. Normally, I CMD-Q and relaunch. Now the CMD-Q won't stop the Safari process. Not sure of closing a Window would either. Do I have to kill it off in Activity Monitor?

    Obviously this parallels the issues with IOS, where you can double click the home button and then truly kill off the running programs.

    How do we accomplish that in Lion? Does Force Quit do that, or do you go to Activity Monitor?
     
  2. robots3humans0, Jul 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011

    robots3humans0 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Location:
    London, Ontario
    #2
    I hadn't noticed this until reading your post. Thanks for the tip. I'm starting to think there may not even be a way around it as in the "Dock" submenu in System Preferences theres an option to hide dock indicator lights. Seems to me they're really pushing the iOS state-saving feature. Like the scrolling features.. and really any other new feature it'll just take some getting used to I suppose. They must have really optimized memory management for Lion if they're expecting users to not actually quit apps but "suspend" them. With regards to Safari.. I do the same thing. Looks like it'll have to be either Force Quit or killed via Activity monitor. Another "feature" brought it from iOS like you mentioned. The activity monitor is basically like double clicking the home button. Its an option that's not 100%necessary, but it's there if something is actually wrong.
     
  3. Littleodie914 macrumors 68000

    Littleodie914

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    #3
    I agree that the new "Resume" feature in Lion is quite frustrating. I too have opened a PDF in Preview, flipped through it, then quit Preview. Couple days later double-clicked an image on my desktop, and got both the image and the PDF from earlier.

    First, note that there is an option to disable this feature in the System Preferences. (I think it's under Appearance?)

    Second, note that developers have to opt-in for this feature to work properly. Lion doesn't take care of it for you automatically. The transition will be slow, and I'm sure many developers will simply never include the functionality.

    Third, quitting an application DOES kill the process. The application, upon exiting, simply saves as much of its current state as it can to preferences/files somewhere, then when relaunching, reads those values and restores your tabs/documents/windows/etc.
     
  4. aross99 thread starter macrumors 68000

    aross99

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    #4
    I couldn't find a preference for this, I will have to look when I get home after work...

    I read about that, and that is why I was surprised to see this behaviour on existing legacy apps. My impression is that this is the way this is supposed to work, and that the changes the developers needed to make was more for the versions and autosave functionality. Are you saying it might work differently on applications that have been updated for this? I did see that TextEdit had a "Quit and forget open windows" option or something like that.

    This is good to know, although it seems like Lion is handling the suspend/resume functionality and not the application, since it works on applications that haven't been updated yet.

    Either way - it is certainly something that is going to take some getting used too...
     
  5. aross99 thread starter macrumors 68000

    aross99

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    #5
    I just saw this in MacWorld's Lion Review under RESUME:

    Here is a link to the review:

    http://www.macworld.com/article/161026/2011/07/osx_lion_review.html?t=

    Good to know!
     
  6. interrobang macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    #6
    That's it in a nutshell. All of the "Hide", "minimze" or "close" comparisons don't really help you understand what's going on.
     
  7. Littleodie914 macrumors 68000

    Littleodie914

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    #7
    Interesting. There are essentially two kinds of applications that you can write for Mac OS X:

    • Document-based Apps
    • Non-document-based Apps

    To the user this distinction can sometimes get a bit hazy, but generally games, single-window apps, etc. are non-document-based, while TextEdit, Preview, etc. are document-based.

    I wonder, then, if Lion automatically enables Resume for document-based apps, and single-window application developers have to do the extra work to implement the previous state.

    I'll admit to not really having looked at the Resume documentation yet. :eek:
     
  8. Yumunum macrumors 65816

    Yumunum

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    Apr 24, 2011
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    U.S.
    #8
  9. miamialley macrumors 68030

    miamialley

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #9
    System preferences > General >

    "Restore windows when quitting and re-opening apps." Either check or uncheck the box.
     
  10. Sheet macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Location:
    Kiel, Germany
    #10
    "Command + Option + Q" is the new real application quit.


    I am getting used to let run applications, e.g. preview, all the time. So don't I quit them, I only close open documents.
     
  11. aross99 thread starter macrumors 68000

    aross99

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    #11

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