United Air to Start Charging for 2nd Bag!

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Spizzo, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. Spizzo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    #1
    Link

    I never fly United, but almost always have 2 bags. Don't think I will be flying them anytime soon.
    According to their release, only 1 in 4 passengers check more than one bag. If that is the case, I don't understand how my second bag would make much of a difference.
    If other airlines follow, I guess I'll just have to get a bigger bag.
     
  2. jbernie macrumors 6502a

    jbernie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #2
    You can't weigh a passenger but you can weigh their bags :)

    I believe this is only for domestic flights, so if you are connecting to another United flight that is heading to Europe or Asia etc you should be fine.

    Then again, 2 suitcases for a domestic only trip??

    Also keep in mind, Frontier charges $50 per bag that is overweight.

    Depending on which way you look at it, it probably evens out in the end.
     
  3. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #3
    I wouldn't put it past the airlines. Just add it to the things you have to do at security.
     
  4. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #4
    Yeah, so? I don't see the difference between flying overseas and flying domestically with regards to bags. The number of bags will just depend on the length of your trip, and your purpose.

    If they really want to start charging extra, they should make some special seats for wider passengers in economy class, and just make them 50% more expensive or something. For example, if there are 4 seats in the middle section of an airplane, make two special rows that have 3 seats only, and make each seat wider. If they charge 33% more money for these seats, they'd break even and gain nothing from it (ie: they have 4 passengers occupying that space rather than 3, but those passengers will only pay a bit more). Now, if they charge 50% more for those seats, then they'd make a bit of profit.

    Some may say this is discrimination against fat....sorry, I mean "wide" people, but it's not. It's an option, and they don't need to take it.
     
  5. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #5
    Does a purse/laptop case count as a bag, or is it one bag + one personal bag?



    EDIT: I'm an idiot... we're talking about checked baggage. :eek:
     
  6. devilot Moderator emeritus

    devilot

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    #6
    Pretty sure they're talking about checked bags (as in bags that go under the plane, in the cargo-hold) and not bags you bring onboard.

    That said, UA has for quite some time, charged $50 if your check-in bag weighs more than 50 lbs. I think that's pretty standard across most airlines.

    And I agree that it's a bit silly to say "domestic flights" only because like Abstract says, it would depend on a traveler's length of visit moreso than final destination.

    Shrug. Doesn't bug me all that much because I rarely check and when I do? I don't go over one bag. Would impact my parents perhaps as they travel more and at times, have more than one bag each (bringing gifts to/from).
     
  7. Unspeaked macrumors 68020

    Unspeaked

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Location:
    West Coast
    #7
    This is more about fuel than space.

    The more a plane weights, the more fuel it takes to keep it going.

    That's why airlines are considering the one bag limit. That's why airlines charge if your bags are overweight.

    How things have changed since the days of check as many bags as you want, they don't get weighed, you get a full meal even on short domestic flights, ashtrays in the arm rests, etc, etc, etc...
     
  8. Spizzo thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    #8
    In the past, haven't fuel costs been taken into account in the ticket price? Pretty soon they will be charging for anything extra we bring on the plane.
    I work in a different sector of the transportation industry, and our rates haven't gone up in proportion to the fuel rates. If we did that, our economy (and the worlds) would crumble. And we burn a lot of fuel.
     
  9. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #9
    i dont see this as such a big deal personally. i can't see ever needing more one checked piece unless i was moving or some such or for any trip longer than two weeks.
     
  10. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    In a Hell predominately of my own making
    #10
    I've been managing week-long trips with one carryon and one briefcase forty times a year for the last eight years, and it's never been an issue. I figure that anything over that would require one additional bag, meaning the same as above, plus a single checked bag. Anything over five days, I plan on doing laundry anyway. This is zero-impact for most frequent travelers, or those that really think about what they need seriously, but hits the folks that can't seem to make a three day journey without five pieces of luggage (and they're out there!)
     
  11. Unspeaked macrumors 68020

    Unspeaked

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Location:
    West Coast
    #11
    Yes, so the folks who would just board with carry-ons or 1 check-in were subsidizing those that would show up with their family of four, each with two bags of skiing equipment (which happens all the time).

    This is a lot more fair. A married couple taking a flight and sharing a check-in should not be paying the same per ticket price as a married couple who lug on two check-ins a piece.


    I think for the most part, this isn't a big deal. The folks that take advantage of the two bag limited are the ones that are complaining.

    Sure, I've taken trips where I've checked in two bags, but it's such a rarity that I don't mind this charge one bit.
     
  12. GSMiller macrumors 68000

    GSMiller

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #12
    Sooo....How much does a bag have to weigh to be considered overweight?
     
  13. Unspeaked macrumors 68020

    Unspeaked

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Location:
    West Coast
    #13
    Depends on the airline.

    Usually around 50 lbs.
     
  14. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #14
    It's more fair, but is the base fare price going to drop? I kinda doubt that....
     
  15. mactastic1971 macrumors regular

    mactastic1971

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #15
    According to NPR this morning, its going to save UA ~$25M.
    If you make 50k airmiles you can checkin 3 bags at no extra cost, so Im alright Jack.
    ;)
     
  16. Hankster macrumors 68020

    Hankster

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #16
    I think too many people bring too much stuff on trips anyway :) I try to slim down as much as possible!
     
  17. jbernie macrumors 6502a

    jbernie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #17
    A true frequent flyer will travel as light as possible, and if possible will not check their bag as that only causes more delays. There will always be people who need to carry more than one bag. But in reality, $25 for a second bag is not too dramatic.

    In the end, to you the average traveller who only ever carries one bag you will not notice the difference, for the true frequent flyer with United you won't be charged for your loyality. To the person who needs to carry their whole closet for a one week trip or who has no loyality to an airline and just goes for the cheapest fair then you may want to give though to how you travel.
     
  18. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    #18
    As a pretty frequent traveler, I couldn't care less. People take way too much crap on vacations. The more you travel, the better you get at packing right. I can go away for a week with a carry on and a brief case.
     
  19. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #19
    Yes but the bigger bag could be more than 50 lbs whereby you pay an extra $25-50 depending upon the airline.
    No matter what I never travel light. Camera, laptop, hair dryer if I go some place where there isn't one and my rocks anyway, flat iron, shoes, jeans, sweaters, etc. It is really the only "girl" thing I do right.

    Anyway, 2nd bag...screw UA. I'm off to NY in May then heading down to NC and FL for a while...I'll need at least two bags but I'm not flying UA. :)
     
  20. Spizzo thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    #20

    This is true. I'm usually right at 50 lbs. with my big bag anyways. But, usually when I fly, I'm not going anywhere for a week, it's usually more like 4 months, for work. And I don't pack anything I won't need. So I guess I am a special case. I guess I'll just steer clear of UA from now on. Never was a big fan anyways.
    I miss the days when customers were more important than profits. If airlines want to cut costs, why don't they do away with their stupid monthly magazine?
     
  21. sysiphus macrumors 6502a

    sysiphus

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    #21
    My question is why not just charge passengers for being over a certain weight?
    Don't separate men and women; the simple reality is that weight==fuel. If, for example, there was a combined weight norm of 200lbs for bags+passenger, and then an excess charge for every pound over, that would help cover costs. Furthermore, force passengers over a certain weight to buy two seats. No, I'm not kidding. Neither the airline nor the other passengers should be paying/suffering for oversized persons/baggage. I don't care wether you're a sumo wrestler or a huge pregnant lady. Weight is weight, size is size. Is this singling out those who weigh more, is this biased against the overweight/oversized? Better believe it. And before jumping on my back for prejudice, etc, consider how much fun it was to be squeezed in next to a 300lb person in coach, when the person is literally oozing over the armrest. Do you really want everyone to pay for individual passengers' excess? I don't. Maybe it's not "fair," but it's certainly equitable.
     
  22. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #22
    We're talking about planes that weigh near 180 tonnes empty. ...I don't think the extra weight of a few over-weight passengers is adding that much to your ticket.
     
  23. sysiphus macrumors 6502a

    sysiphus

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    #23
    I think I see where you're going with this, but then why should we charge for heavy bags? An extra 20lbs in a suitcase is equivalent to 20lbs on a person...
    I can't pull statistics out of my head for this one as to the precise values for the rising weight of travelers over the past 10 years, per say, but I will see what I can do. As half my friends and family seem to be employed by Boeing, surely I'll be able to get some numbers without too much trouble.
     
  24. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Location:
    A geographical oddity
    #24
    This will clearly affect families more than it will affect business travelers - which United knows and has planned for accordingly. Business travelers are willing to pay more for a given seat, and bring less with them. Families travel cheaper, and need to being more with them. My wife and I are flying out to visit her parents this week. We used to make the trip with two backpacks. Now, with our daughter, we check a bag, bring four carry-ons and gate check a stroller and a car seat.

    Clearly United has a vested interest in maximizing profits, but at the same time, you have to wonder how much loyalty they are building. To this point, my daughter in her roughly less than a year of life has logged roughly 40,000 miles, and she has another 25,000 planned in the next couple of months. All have been on Delta and Continental, and except for this trip on SW, I don't think she'll ever see the interior of any other airline.
     
  25. samh004 macrumors 68020

    samh004

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2004
    Location:
    Australia
    #25
    If this ever caught on in other countries for other airlines I feel I would be safe due to being a frequent flyer/member of a milage club. I'd hope that frequent flyers of United get that same exception to the rule.

    I think I used to be with United back in the 90's. :rolleyes:

    You should see the actual flight paths they take, due to so many aircraft everywhere they sometimes take odd routes that take longer and burn more fuel than they should.
     

Share This Page