Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
52,007
13,630


The University Health Network today announced the launch of a new study that will aim to find out how the Apple Watch can help with the early identification of heart failure progression.

apple-watch-series-6-blood-oxygen-monitoring-1.jpg

Cardiologist Dr. Heather Ross is teaming up with Apple to compare data collected by the Apple Watch to data routinely collected from the physical tests heart failure patients undergo. The study will determine whether the health sensors and features in the Apple Watch, including the Blood Oxygen app and mobility metrics, can provide early warning signs, and whether patients can perform traditionally clinic-based assessments in their own homes.

Patients from the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre will be asked to participate in a three month active monitoring study, with each patient using an iPhone and an Apple Watch Series 6, which is the Apple Watch model that offers the Blood Oxygen app.

Apple's vice president of Health, Sumbul Desai, said that studies like this and heart health insights have an important role in the evolution of the Apple Watch.
"Surfacing heart health insights has played a key role in the evolution of Apple Watch and we're continually humbled by the responses we hear from users on the impact it has had on their lives," says Dr. Sumbul Desai, Apple's vice president of Health. "We're thrilled to be collaborating with UHN and Dr. Heather Ross to better understand how the powerful sensors in Apple Watch can potentially help patients better manage heart failure, from the comfort of their own home."
Dr. Ross, who is leading the study, said that she believes that biometric data from the Apple Watch "may provide comparable, precise, and accurate measurements of fitness, prognostic markers and early warning signals, compared to traditional diagnostics."

The Apple Watch has been the subject of multiple heart-related studies in the past, including a study Apple did in partnership with Stanford Medicine to determine whether the Apple Watch can detect atrial fibrillation.

The study determined that the Apple Watch can indeed detect irregular heart rhythms, and the Apple Watch has a built-in feature in many countries that allows it to alert wearers when an abnormal heart rhythm is detected. Other Apple Watch-related studies are under way, focusing on asthma, heart failure, early detection of COVID-19, and cognitive decline.

Article Link: University Health Network Launches Apple Watch Heart Failure Study That Uses Blood Oxygen App
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepIn2U

DeepIn2U

macrumors G3
May 30, 2002
8,419
3,121
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I don’t think I have heard of any studies using Healthkit / Apple Watch available outside the US. Am I wrong?
you're not wrong on this. I'm hoping these projects get to expand outside of the USA ... collective knowledge is that of the science industry - it's not a gain for political stance. Maybe Apple still has a solid and strong relationship with universities in the USA still.

Maybe there is something with international law maybe preventing Apple from expanding Healthkit research?
 
  • Like
Reactions: kyjaotkb
Comment

nitramluap

macrumors 6502
Apr 26, 2015
314
744
I think the Apple Watch might have a huge role to play in sleep apnoea detection/warning. Think about it:
- pulse oximetry (low sats)
- heart rate (tachycardia)
- noise detection (snoring/obstruction)
- movement detection (disturbed sleep patterns)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Captain Trips
Comment

wigby

macrumors 68020
Jun 7, 2007
2,079
1,682
you're not wrong on this. I'm hoping these projects get to expand outside of the USA ... collective knowledge is that of the science industry - it's not a gain for political stance. Maybe Apple still has a solid and strong relationship with universities in the USA still.

Maybe there is something with international law maybe preventing Apple from expanding Healthkit research?
Apple has more influence and trust from US health authorities. Each country have their own set of criteria and standards so trying to conform to all of those at once is an impossibility and would take decades to undergo. Science works by establishing a theory in practice and building upon that. Once American scientists and doctors can prove the viability of a study, it would be quickly adopted by all other countries willing to adjust their criteria to match that of Apple’s. It’s not too different from the international supply chain that Apple has established for their own products except that one works in reverse.
 
Comment

Darrensk8

macrumors 6502
Apr 22, 2010
346
173
I find the pulse oximetry readings I get to be all over the place so can this part of the data be that much use?
 
Comment

shinyleaf

macrumors newbie
Nov 7, 2016
12
23
I don’t think I have heard of any studies using Healthkit / Apple Watch available outside the US. Am I wrong?

You’re reading about one.

“University Health Network” and the Peter Munk cardiac center are in Toronto, Canada.

UHN is a group of hospitals in Toronto. The “University” in the name is not as in a school. It’s referring to that a bunch of the hospitals in the network is on a street named “University Avenue”.
 
Comment

npmacuser5

macrumors 65816
Apr 10, 2015
1,310
1,379
The big win for devices like Apple Watch. Little user input required, effectively 24 hour monitoring, massive amount of data, accuracy obtained over time, easy to join studies, and more to come. Does the Apple Watch need perfect accuracy on any one feature, No. The more data the more accuracy. Awesome time we live in.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nebulance
Comment

Robert.Walter

macrumors 68000
Jul 10, 2012
1,672
1,819
I think the Apple Watch might have a huge role to play in sleep apnoea detection/warning. Think about it:
- pulse oximetry (low sats)
- heart rate (tachycardia)
- noise detection (snoring/obstruction)
- movement detection (disturbed sleep patterns)
My 88yo is on her 3rd Apple Watch. She had a 0, 3 now 6.

She has lung issues so she uses a cpap machine nightly.

I was a little surprised that the cpap didn’t have an oxymetry feature to give a closed loop performance or at least allow monitoring.

So besides besides the 6 being there to monitor her O2 saturation, in the event she gets pneumonia (an annual occurrence these last 5 winters) we are going to look to see what her overnight oxygenation looks like.

My sister and I also upgraded to the 6 for monitoring ox sat in the event we get covid (she works in a big hospital.)
 
Comment

Edge100

macrumors 68000
May 14, 2002
1,560
12
Where am I???
you're not wrong on this. I'm hoping these projects get to expand outside of the USA ... collective knowledge is that of the science industry - it's not a gain for political stance. Maybe Apple still has a solid and strong relationship with universities in the USA still.

Maybe there is something with international law maybe preventing Apple from expanding Healthkit research?
This one is in Canada, so there’s that.
 
Comment

Devin Breeding

macrumors regular
May 2, 2020
126
93
Conway SC
I find the O2 readings to be more useful as a trend and not accuracy on single readings. For example, since I’ve gone back to exercising regularly my average monthly O2 has steadily risen 2% over 5 months. However, it is not terribly uncommon to get a random low 85% reading while I feel perfectly fine followed by a healthy 99% reading immediately after. Usually it seems fairly accurate otherwise.

if they’re looking at trends for the study, I could definitely see how it could be useful.
 
Comment

DeepIn2U

macrumors G3
May 30, 2002
8,419
3,121
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I find the O2 readings to be more useful as a trend and not accuracy on single readings. For example, since I’ve gone back to exercising regularly my average monthly O2 has steadily risen 2% over 5 months. However, it is not terribly uncommon to get a random low 85% reading while I feel perfectly fine followed by a healthy 99% reading immediately after. Usually it seems fairly accurate otherwise.

if they’re looking at trends for the study, I could definitely see how it could be useful.

im very curious at what point you’re getting 85% readings?.
 
Comment

DeepIn2U

macrumors G3
May 30, 2002
8,419
3,121
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
You’re reading about one.

“University Health Network” and the Peter Munk cardiac center are in Toronto, Canada.

UHN is a group of hospitals in Toronto. The “University” in the name is not as in a school. It’s referring to that a bunch of the hospitals in the network is on a street named “University Avenue”.
Thank you!

this information, unless I’m completely whacked is missing or mislead as not in the article; the first hyperlink reveals this.
 
Comment

gr8pics

macrumors regular
Jan 20, 2008
173
4
I think the Apple Watch might have a huge role to play in sleep apnoea detection/warning. Think about it:
- pulse oximetry (low sats)
- heart rate (tachycardia)
- noise detection (snoring/obstruction)
- movement detection (disturbed sleep patterns)
Theres a big downside to this, wifi signals next to you all night, and never time to charge the watch.
 
Comment

Devin Breeding

macrumors regular
May 2, 2020
126
93
Conway SC
im very curious at what point you’re getting 85% readings?.
The only correlation I’ve noticed is when my watch band has loosened a bit and slightly shifted up my wrist. I have one of the magnetic clasp stainless steel bands. I’m normally 97-100% and I actually got a 100% immediately after a low reading with a small watch adjustment. I don’t know what causes it to still capture the reading instead of marking it unsuccessful though. I actually don’t know if it has happened at all since the last update. My point is, it is accurate enough for trends but not direct alert notifications like the ECG is.
 
Comment

nitramluap

macrumors 6502
Apr 26, 2015
314
744
Theres a big downside to this, wifi signals next to you all night, and never time to charge the watch.
I don't wear a tin foil hat when I sleep... also, there is zero evidence that any of that does any harm at all.

Secondly, there is SO much electromagnetic radiation going right through you entire house (and your body) every day - natural & artificial - if you think your home WiFi (or devices) is suddenly a problem, you need to do some more reading!

I charge the watch after a workout, before bedtime & when showering. Plenty of time to keep it topped up.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.