Unpartitioning my hard drive after erasing Windows partition.

Discussion in 'iMac' started by highwaychile212, Jul 12, 2009.

  1. highwaychile212 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2009
    #1
    Okay, so I got OS X Leopard. I had a copy of Windows Vista, and decided to try out the Boot Camp Assistant. Didn't have a problem partitioning the drives and installing Windows. However, I now find it entirely pointless to have Windows on my Mac being that I have a PC now. I tried doing it myself at first, and ended up erasing the Windows partition, and now I'm having troubles combining the drives into one. I saw something about running an uninstaller through the Boot Camp Assistant, but I think erasing the Windows partition ruined that for me. Whenever I try to use the BCA while the drive is mounted I get this error message: The startup disk cannot be partitioned or restored to a single partition. The startup disk must be formatted as a single Mac OS Extended (Journaled) volume or already partitioned by Boot Camp Assistant for installing Windows. When I unmount the Windows partition, I get THIS error message: Boot Camp Assistant cannot be used. This startup disk is not supported. I already tried reading through a few forums/posts regarding this issue, but still couldn't get it to work using their advice. Can anybody help me? Thanks. :)
     
  2. macbookairman macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Location:
    United States
    #2
    You can join the partitions in disk utility.

    Go to spotlight, and search for Disk Utility.

    Once your in Disk Utility, select your hard drive. There should be a partition tab--select that.

    Then select the partition you don't want and hit the subtraction sign below. Then it will ask you if you really want to do that, and tell you what will be erased and what won't.
     
  3. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Finland
    #3
    Just click the Windows partition and then the minus and drag the OS X partition to full size.
     

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