(UPDATE) Power Line Networking Security

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
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Instead of running a new Cat5 cable though the attic and walls I'm thinking I might be able to use the Power Line Networking Adapters as an alternative, but need some insight to see if what I want to do will work.

Here's the background info:

-We have "Fiber To The Home" (15 down/15 up) so no modems involved.
-Cat5 comes into garage along with cable and then gets dispursed (1 line upstairs/1 line downstairs).
-The Cat5 line downstairs goes to an outlet in a bedroom then then into my Time Capsule and then everything is connected by WiFi.
-Want to move the TC into the living room so I can hard wire a few devices and have better WiFi broadcasting for everything else.

So I saw this at Best Buy;
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/NETGEAR+-+1-port+Powerline+Adapter+Kit/3536038.p?id=1218410802490&skuId=3536038

Can I plug one of these PL Adapters into an electrical outlet in the bedroom, where the Cat5 outlet is and plug the ethernet into it? And then plug the other PL Adapter into the electrical outlet in the living room and plug the ethernet cable from the PL Adapter to the Time Capsule?
 
Last edited:

IeU

macrumors member
May 1, 2011
93
5
i would also like to know that. 15MB or 15Mb you speaking of?

How fast are these power line networking?
 

HazyCloud

macrumors 68030
Jun 30, 2010
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You can as long as both electrical outlets are on the same breaker box. I'd get this one instead though as it supports speeds up to 500 Mbps where as the one you linked to was up to 200 Mbps.
 

drsox

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2011
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Xhystos
IMO don't expect better than 15% of the rated data rates from PowerLine systems. I've use 3gens of these and stopped at the 200Mbps versions. Best I could achieve was 30Mbps.

I rewired to achieve CAT6 instead.
 

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
895
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i would also like to know that. 15MB or 15Mb you speaking of?

How fast are these power line networking?
Mine is 15mbps

You can as long as both electrical outlets are on the same breaker box. I'd get this one instead though as it supports speeds up to 500 Mbps where as the one you linked to was up to 200 Mbps.
Thanks for posting this, I will definitely look at this one.

IMO don't expect better than 15% of the rated data rates from PowerLine systems. I've use 3gens of these and stopped at the 200Mbps versions. Best I could achieve was 30Mbps.

I rewired to achieve CAT6 instead.
So if I got one that topped at 200mbps and I was achieving 30mbps like you have gotten, I still wouldn't be reaching my limit, correct?
 

drsox

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2011
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Xhystos
I don't know what you mean by limit. Since there are 500Mbps advertised systems now you might be able to reach 150Mbps (but who knows - not me ?)

Personally I wouldn't invest more in PowerLine - I would wait for 802.11ac WiFi to be available and go for a pair of Access Points. The problem with WiFi might still be latency rather than data rate, but if you're not streaming video then this isn't so important.

If you have the ability then running CAT6 (or at least CAT5e) is well worth it. Make sure you use CAT6 plugs, sockets and wall boxes if you do (and/or a CAT6 punch down frame)
 

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
895
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I don't know what you mean by limit. Since there are 500Mbps advertised systems now you might be able to reach 150Mbps (but who knows - not me ?)
Powerline Adapter is advertised at 500mbps

Maybe real world I get 150mbps

My fiber connection is 15mbps up and down so I would never hit 150mbps anyway, correct?
 

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
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OK, yes. If your sole objective is to get at maximum 15Mbps, then go for the 200Mbps PowerLine (I used Devolo not Netgear - http://www.devolo.com/consumer/dlan-mains-supply-network-via-powerline.html?l=en).

Are you sure you want nothing faster or is this just a this year/next year solution ?
That is basically what it comes down to really. Will it do me any good to get something faster since what I'm getting is still below what the PowerLine adapter is capable of?
 

drsox

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2011
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Xhystos
Depends on how much you want to pay. 200Mbps systems are quite cheap now (no longer cutting edge).
Personally I would go for a 500Mbps system as then I would have a bit more headroom for when my Internet speed gets increased.

Try it and see - if it isn't working out then eBay it - that's where my Powerline Systems went.
Maybe worth buying it from eBay as a cheaper trial.
 

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
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Security Question

Ok, I got a pair of PowerLine Network Adapters and everything running exactly as I wanted it to. I have my Fiber connection coming into the house in a bedroom, and it is going straight into the PL Adapter in the wall outlet. I have the other PL Adapter in the living room where the ethernet cable then goes into my Time Capsule.

The kit came with a disc to set up the Encryption for the PL Adapters and supposed to set it up when the program finds the adapters throughout the Wireless network. But I have them "in front" of my Time Capsule instead of sending the ethernet connection to another room "after" my router. (If that makes sense)

Do I need some kind of security for the PL Adapters if they're before my wireless network?
 

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
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:mad::mad:

Apparently I spoke too soon! When I first set this all up I was getting the 15mbps that we are supposed to get and everything seemed fine. Now all of the sudden I am getting 1mbps barely!!

Doing some googling some say that if you have a surge protector plugged into the same outlet with stuff plugged into it that it will suck all of the power and drop your speeds. So it looks like these are going back to Best Buy and I'll have to run cat5 into the living room.:(
 

drsox

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2011
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Xhystos
The powerline designers are well aware of the problems of surge protectors/power strips etc. Devolo has a range of plugs that allow the original socket to be retained for use by putting a socket on the front of the powerline plug. See : http://www.devolo.com/consumer/70_dlan-200-avsmart_starter-kit_product-presentation_1.html?l=en.

I guess this design allows the power line unit to be unaffected by the surge protector. If you like the idea of powerline then why not get a pair of these type of units and try them out ?
 

b-rad g

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
895
1
The powerline designers are well aware of the problems of surge protectors/power strips etc. Devolo has a range of plugs that allow the original socket to be retained for use by putting a socket on the front of the powerline plug. See : http://www.devolo.com/consumer/70_dlan-200-avsmart_starter-kit_product-presentation_1.html?l=en.

I guess this design allows the power line unit to be unaffected by the surge protector. If you like the idea of powerline then why not get a pair of these type of units and try them out ?
No need to now. I ran a hard line of cat6 so now I'm good. Thanks for the help though.