Updating an old G4 imac (17inch flat panel, 800mhz)

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by psipsina, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. psipsina macrumors newbie

    psipsina

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    #1
    I have an seemingly ancient flat panel iMac that I'd like to install more memory on. It currently has two 256 mhz installed in it. I'd like to bring it up to the 1g max. Its only used for internet surfing but it can't handle youtube and I'm hoping to ratify that. Trouble is that I've never cracked her open myself and have no clue how to go about doing this. Anyone know of a good online guide??
     
  2. carlosbutler macrumors 6502a

    carlosbutler

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    London City
    #2
    i would have said youtube, but thats a bit out of the question from what you said...unless of course you have access to another computer. try looking on the apple website. i assume you meant that it has 256mb and not 256mhz.

    but you should be able to google it and easily find a guide
     
  3. madog macrumors 65816

    madog

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2004
    Location:
    Korova Milkbar
    #3
    There is a PC-133 (144 pin) SO-DIMM that is user accessible via the 4 (unremovable, they just loosen up) phillips screws on the bottom plate. Just tip that bad boy on its side (unless something is broken, it's OK to grab it solely by the "arm", or better yet to have one hand on the "arm", and one on the base of it) and carefully place the monitor face down on something soft and even (maybe the middle of a bed, or better yet some cloth/foam laid down on a table or desk). This will give you access to the bottom.

    So you can start by placing a 512 chip in there, as once the plate is taken off the RAM is right there. I believe there are even little instructions on the plate, either on the outside of it or on the inside (I don't remember).

    Not really recommended for the other stick....

    The un-user-accessible stick is the bigger "desktop version" of PC-133, (168-pin) SDRAM. With the appropriate hex (I think that's what it's called) screw driver via another 4 screws. You'll see them with the bottom plate removed.

    That entire bottom section of the base is what is separated here (you can see the seam or edge about 1-inch from the very bottom going along the entire base, just above all the ports). That bottom section of the base is where the other RAM stick goes, which is easy enough to get open, but the crazy part is that it also has the logic board and all the cables going from it to the upper section. So in that sense you can't completely separate the bottom section from the base (you can, but you don't need or want to). However, as per the reason mentioned below, it can be kind of tough to separate or un-stick that bottom section even with the screws removed. It takes a bit of pressure depending on how lucky you're feeling.

    While that's not too bad for most techy people, the downside is that the heatsink from the processor also connects that bottom section to the upper section of the base. It IS recommended that because you severe that connection, you have some thermal grease and a putty knife to remove the previous gunk, and reapply a thin, fresh layer of your own.

    While I have done it and forgotten to not reapply that thermal grease, I would recommend it otherwise.

    While searching google, it should be easy to find a "flat panel" "imac" "take apart" guide to at least get you from point A to point B.

    Although, I have probably scared you off completely from installing that second stick :eek:
     
  4. psipsina thread starter macrumors newbie

    psipsina

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    #4
    Haha yeah you have :) I have some techy friends (though they are PC techy types) that I might enlist for this whole thermal grease nonsense lol. I do have access to other computers (the old imac isn't my primary computer, but more the one my husband uses when I hog the updated model) so I'll look into youtube videos too. thanks :)
     
  5. PurrBall macrumors 6502a

    PurrBall

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2007
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #5
    I must say that opening the iMac beyond the user-accessible slot on the bottom isn't very difficult, it's closing that is the hard part. Getting the screw holes to align properly is really quite difficult to do.
     
  6. madog macrumors 65816

    madog

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2004
    Location:
    Korova Milkbar
    #6
    That's the second half of the battle. The worst part (not too difficult, just not fun by any means) is replacing the HDD/optical drive. After doing that for a friend I left my DNA inside of it by way of bloody cuts and scrapes.
     

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