Upgrade from MacBook Pro late 2008 to core i5/i7 worth it

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by youngmac, Aug 30, 2010.

  1. youngmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2010
    #1
    Hey Guys,
    I have the macbook pro stated in my signature. I was thinking selling it and buy the core i5 or i7. to have better cpu, better battery life, graphics (automatic switching) and to get the matte screen.
    do you think is a worthy upgrade?
    also i was wondering do the sell antiglare screen macbook pro 15 in store (London).
    Thanks
     
  2. ouimetnick macrumors 68020

    ouimetnick

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Beverly, Massachusetts
    #2
    The new Core i5 and i7 will be faster. However, does your computer still do everything you want it to do? If yes, keep it. Wait for Sandy Bridge, THAT will be a HUGE improvement over the C2D.
     
  3. youngmac thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2010
    #3
    Thanks for the quick reply.
    i'm not familiar with the type of cpus.
     
  4. TopHatPlus macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Location:
    Southern Ontario
    #4
    hey like he stated what do you do with the computer and are you finding it slow if so then you do not need to upgrade

    c2d - a standard dual core processor with a fairly high clock speed

    i5 - turbo boosting to safely over clock one processing core
    - hyper thready, basically imitates a quad core processor for better multi tasking

    i7 - same as i5 but faster clock speeds before and after turbo boost

    i am upgrading from a 2007 macbook 2.16 ghz c2d to a 2010 2.66 i7 which will be a MASSIVE difference, and it is really slow for loads of high def movie editing, if your machine is running fine and doing what you need keep it and what for the new sandy bridge processors and what ever else crazy will come out next year.
     
  5. youngmac thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2010
    #5
    thanks for the info.
    actually i love my current macbook pro, it's my first macbook pro.
    it's just that beside cpu upgrade, higher resolution screen, better battery life, better graphics etc seem interesting.

    i have only one game on bootcamp i play often.
    I do hd video editing, few photo editing. internet surfing.
    i watch hd movies on it, when i watch 1080p it can be laggy. but i switch to the 9600m gt and it's better.
     
  6. TopHatPlus macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Location:
    Southern Ontario
    #6
    i also do a lot of HD movie editing i bought a go pro helmet hero (helmet cam) that shoots 1080 p 30 fps or 720p 60 fps, it is amazing, but for 4 hours of video it is 32 GB of data and my 2007 macbook with my gma 950 64 MB graphics card it is very very very laggy and i am only editing in 960 x 540, not the optional 1920 x 1080 which would be amazing!!!! haha i am pumped for my new computer which should be here by wednesday =D, i would almost recommend it if you can easily afford the upgrade, the turbo boost is what i am most pumped for no more 2-5 hour waits while i make thumbnails and rendering will be so much faster, i got the 15" 2.66 ghz i7 which high res glossy screen, 4 GB of ram, gt 330m gpu with 512 MB, i am very excited =D
     
  7. MagnusVonMagnum macrumors 601

    MagnusVonMagnum

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    #7
    Hmmm, my October of 2008 purchased MBP (on closeout, it's the Sep. and earlier model with the 8600M GT and I saved $600 in the process by getting that model instead of the "new" one that month) has a matte screen already, so that's no reason for me to want to upgrade. The model from Oct. 2008 through mid 2009 wasn't really significantly faster in ANY area what-so-ever and then following model, just barely. The i5/i7 models are the first ones to show a significant performance increase for CPU and graphics are slightly faster (still little difference for gaming, IMO; both are so-so compared to a desktop GPU). For most uses, however, we're talking about splitting hairs, though. A few seconds faster rendering isn't going to make or break my bank and Logic has plenty of power to spare here and FCP won't use the 2nd core as it is.

    In other areas, the uni-body looks nicer and is more solid (matters little to me, though and I like the keyboard style on mine) and I do NOT like the non-removable battery design (lasts longer, but I can swap batteries if I need more power and I won't have to take it apart to change the battery in a few years time). I also like having my 2nd FW port (my PreSonus is using the FW400 port and my backup drive can then still easily plug into the FW800 port without any pass-through, etc.). I also have a real upgrade slot, not just a SD reader (massive down-grade, IMO) which I could use to add something like E-Sata if I wanted or a 2nd FW bus, etc.) Like I said, mine has a REAL matte screen, not a glass one with an anti-glare filter in front of it. It sounds like you have the newer one from the end of 2008 which had two GPU cores, but doesn't auto-switch. I don't have to worry about that since my 8600M GT is on 100% of the time so that's a non-issue here as well.

    So I can't say for certain with your particular needs (glare screen and non-auto GPU switch with somewhat faster CPU/GPU performance) but for me, there's no question that the CPU/GPU improvements aren't enough to warrant a new machine in my case. FCP and Logic already run fine here, let alone all the normal stuff (browsing, etc.) run perfectly fast. Gaming isn't that great either way (better off using my Windows machine unless I'm on the road or something) so it's a non-issue here.

    I'd sooner put my money towards a new desktop machine, maybe a high-powered Hackintosh in the $1200-1500 range with BD burners, 4-cores, a true desktop high powered GPU with a SLI option for Windows boots gaming, etc. It'd be like a low-end Mac Pro with even more GPU power and I could do all kinds of stuff with BD encoding in Windows, etc. for my AppleTV whole house audio/video system, etc. and it'd still cost less than a new MBP. My advice would be to keep what you have unless you have a real need for the newer features (doesn't sound like it offhand). $1000-2000 (depending on the sale of your old MBP) can buy quite a few neat things that do a lot more than a slightly higher CPU/GPU set of numbers, IMO, but that's me.
     
  8. daneoni macrumors G4

    daneoni

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2006
    #8
    I've been mulling this too but i actually love my current setup as well...i'm only thinking i should tradeup whilst i can still get something decent for my current machine. Then again maybe i should just wait till a redesign and/or, sandy bridge and a GPU vendor switch to ATI.
     
  9. TopHatPlus macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Location:
    Southern Ontario
    #9
    good points good points, =D haha, but the express card slot is only so so, ALL digital recording equipment that i use runs SD cards up to 30 mbps (nikon D60 dslr, Go Pro helmet hero) so i WANT an sd card slot, and the graphics are an interesting thing as well, the new macbook pros (not sure about the 13") run 2 graphics cards, a 288 MB intel integrated for running the os and external monitors and all that good stuff, and has a 256 or 512 MB nvidia GT 330 m, for major applications like gaming, i do know that they do not run together but i do not know if they run simultaneously, one operating the screen and other things and one running SC2 for example, that i am waiting to find out.

    he is correct though for just effortless power a tower is ideal, the new i am with the quad core and 1GB graphics looks pretty awesome!!!

    and my next computer will have to get a mac pro tower, i am out of options laptops will only get so mach fast and the tower is upgradeable =D
     
  10. youngmac thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2010
    #10
    thanks for your input guys.
    @ TopHatPlus for you it will be a great upgrade. Let's us know how you find your new machine when you get it.

    @ MagnusVonMagnum mine is removable battery like yours but i get mostly 4 hours. and has express card instead of the sd card slot. it has 2 GPUs but i mainly use the integrated nvidia 9400m, when watching 1080p it can be laggy. i rarely switch to the 9600m gt. You have a good point though. i was thinking like you maybe it will better to keep my macbook pro and i buy a powerful desktop pc.

    @ daneoni what's your setup?
     
  11. daneoni macrumors G4

    daneoni

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2006
    #11
    Early 09 Rev (not Mid 09) MBP 2.66GHz 6MB L2 Cache with removable battery, ExpressCard etc but also updated to support 8GB o RAM. Paired with a 24" ACD.
     
  12. MagnusVonMagnum macrumors 601

    MagnusVonMagnum

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    #12
    The nice thing about the express card slot is that you can get an SD card reader if you need one for it (they work in the USB ports just fine as well), but you can also run all kinds of other expansion cards in the express card slot as well. My point is that it's far more flexible. Apple could have included an SD expansion card as a default install on new models and left the expansion port there for those that would rather use it for something else instead of just removing it entirely for a $12 SD reader. There used to be a reason the word "Pro" was in Macbook Pro. An expansion port is a pro feature. An SD card reader is a consumer feature.

    They do not run at the same time. The lesser GPU is there for one reason and one reason only and that is to conserve battery power. There is no other reason on earth to include it as it is inferior in every other way. The models without the automatic switching were a PITA. I'd rather leave it on all the time and have a backup battery handy than have to log out every time I needed a bit more GPU power or put up with laggy frame rates because it's a PITA to switch it all the time. The automatic model is handier to save battery power, but I do wonder if there's any down sides (i.e. possible glitches switching back and forth all the time? I know I've gotten a LOT of weird/glitchy behavior just from waking my MBP up from sleep over the course of several days...everything from "crackles" in Logic until I reboot to total system freezes when it's docked to a USB hub, but only when waking from sleep). Oddly, my Netbook "hackintosh" does not have those problems when waking from sleep (no glitches yet in 6 months other than being rather slow due to the single Atom CPU), just Apple's own "official" computers.

    It's sad Apple doesn't offer any consumer towers or a lesser pro tower in a more reasonable price range. $2500 is a bit high when you can get a fabulous gaming rig Hackintosh setup with 4 CPUs that can do 95% of the Mac Pro for $1200 in PC Land and run Blu-Ray, etc. when booted into Windows.

    My problem with the Mac Pro is that if you don't need ECC memory, it's way overpriced relative to performance for a non-ECC Hackintosh. There is simply no reason Apple couldn't offer a non-ECC motherboard for the same tower case and offer a standard 4-core i5 or i7 "consumer" MacPro (even bring back the "PowerMac" name?) for around $1500-1800 to start and $2000 with a good gaming GPU standard. It shouldn't cannibalize Mac Pro sales because it's a consumer machine and it shouldn't cannibalize iMac sales because it's sporting a desktop GPU that the iMac cannot compete with. Steve needs to get over his anti-gaming attitude and offer at least one REAL consumer desktop model. I'm willing to pay a few hundred more for an Apple brand tower, but I'm not will to spend $3000 to get an equivalent Mac Pro (with appropriate GPU card already included) to get the same basic performance I can get for $1200 from a Hackintosh. That is just too much difference. I could buy TWO Hackintoshes and have enough money left to buy a 30" monitor for the price of one Mac Pro outfitted for gaming. I could then farm out my Logic and Final Cut Pro needs to the 2nd machine for decreased rendering times as well.
     

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