Upgrade Macbook Pro Memory

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by roux, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. roux macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #1
    I am upgrading my mid 2009 Macbook Pro to 8gb ram. Does it matter whether I buy it as a kit, or can it be just two 4gb stix of the same brand? Best Buy has Kingston 4GB PC3 8500 DDR3 Model: KTA-MB1066/4GETR for $34.99. On another thread, a member said that you should only buy it as a kit.
     
  2. stefmesman macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #2
    if u buy a kit they are paired and will work better. 2 seperate sticks will work. but likely less fast
     
  3. imswimmin macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    #3
    I disagree with stefmesman. I'm pretty sure that there shouldnt be any speed differences between two sticks of the same model and a memory kit.
     
  4. dmccloud macrumors 6502a

    dmccloud

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2009
    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    #4
    There are reasons to purchase kits for use in dual channel and triple channel systems. When you buy two seperate sticks of RAM, the actual chips on the RAM may be different, and that can negatively impact overall memory performance. If you go and look at the PNY RAM Best Buy is selling, you'll probably see that there's different chips on each stick. I've worked at both Best Buy and CompUSA in the past, so I've seen this on multiple occasions. Because memory kits are matched not only by speed and size, but by the chips on the sticks themselves, you are insuring the best possible performance.
     
  5. alust2013 macrumors 601

    alust2013

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Location:
    On the fence
    #5
    Not true. There's no such thing as RAM being "paired", the kits are just convenient so you can get the RAM you want in one package. There is absolutely no difference between a kit and buying two separate sticks from the same brand.
     
  6. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #6
    Depends on the brand. Someone like Crucial makes their own RAM so the same part number is a indentical spec, whereas with say PNY the chips on the DIMM could well be from different manufacturers for the same SKU.

    A kit will ensure you get a pair from the same batch.
     
  7. RoyalFlushAK(s) macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2011
    #7
    What? two different sticks works slower? - What, by 1 millisecond?
    from where did you got this one? - man---, people come up with all kind of worthless "details" like this one, like someone will notice any difference between two different memory sticks. :rolleyes: Jesus Henry Christ....., lol, lol,

    RF,
     
  8. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #8
    The chipset could notice and disable dual channel if the SPD info doesn't match. On a machine with integrated graphics thats a 5-10% performance hit.
     
  9. RoyalFlushAK(s) macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2011
    #9
    Oh, yeah, 10% from a millisecond is gonna be a big deal for you to notice. Isn't that so, pardner?
    lol, lol, lol, loooooooooooooooooooooooooool--- :rolleyes:

    rf
     
  10. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #10
    Pardner? Eh? Sorry don't understand.

    It's not 10% of a millisecond, it's an overall drop on a benchmark run. 10% is typically the difference in CPU speed between the standard and say better models in the Apple range. The lack of dual channel bottlenecks the entire system. It's less of an issue on a MacBook Pro apart from those with 9400M graphics.

    I usually buy my RAM upgrades as a kit from Crucial.
     

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