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a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
It all comes down to needing a new SSD. It's a mid-2012. I am fairly certain I need to upgrade my memory, too. How do I check how much memory is available? I have battery health 2 and memory clean 2. My battery capacity is at 90%. It the original battery it will be six years old this December.

The only thing I have replaced was a hard drive bracket.

In short. I would like to know how I could monitor my memory. I actually think I am using the right app, but I am wondering if I am not doing enough, like maybe there is something that I can look at that is actually part of my MBP already.

Thank you.
 
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hulkk

macrumors member
Jun 27, 2012
61
38
Activity monitor's memory tab gives you something.

Next time you should pay attention and use a descriptive topic. Current one is quite horrible.
 
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Lennyvalentin

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2011
1,431
793
How do I check how much memory is available? I have battery health 2 and memory clean 2. My battery capacity is at 90%. It the original battery it will be six years old this December.
You should be able to see the total memory capacity of your Mac by opening the leftmost menu of the desktop and selecting "about this Mac", and then clicking the system information or whatsitscalled button. You should then see a memory subheading there in the window that opens up.

Also, don't get hung up on how old your battery is - your battery may be quite spry for a 6-y/o, depending on how it has been used. If it gives you good performance still, then be happy. Nothing to worry about. :)

Also (and I realize this may come as a shock to you), but not everyone even knows of you, much less anything about your struggles...! Descriptive topic titles > opaque topic titles! :p
 
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a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
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Also (and I realize this may come as a shock to you), but not everyone even knows of you, much less anything about your struggles...! Descriptive topic titles > opaque topic titles! :p
LOL! I meant by the posts started by me, they may not have read them, but they would know I have had my share of issues.
 
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Clix Pix

macrumors Core
How much RAM (Random Access Memory) do you have in your machine now? How much RAM will that machine accept if you do decide to upgrade it along with putting in an SSD? I think both several of the sites (such as Crucial) which sell RAM will provide charts which show you exactly which RAM chip(s) and which capacity are most suited for your machine.

As for the SSD, that will provide a lot more speed than your current HDD, and again you will need to take capacity into consideration, especially if your current HDD is fairly large. Prices on SSDs are still pretty high and so getting one with a decent amount of capacity (say, 512 GB) could be fairly expensive, and definitely getting one which is a TB or more would definitely fall into the realm of expensive!

So: two things to consider, here. One is how much RAM your machine will be able to handle and the second is how much storage capacity you want in an SSD and how much you can afford. In addition, many people go for buying an extra external HDD or external SSD in order to have the needed extra storage space while not putting all of their money into the internal SSD.

In terms of how much storage is realistic, well of course that depends upon what you currently do with the machine and what you already have stored on it. Large iTunes library? A bunch of video files, both commercial movies and user-rendered and created videos? Maybe a whole lot of documents and PDFs or perhaps you've got a pretty large image file of photos..... Assessing what you already have and how much space you are using plus taking into consideration room for growth will help in evaluating and deciding what storage capacity you will need and want in that SSD. As for RAM, again a lot depends on what you do in the machine, and if you do extensive work in photography or video, or generating lots of documents and PDFs and other things, you will need more RAM than if you simply use the computer for emails, forum browsing and participation, listening to music, watching movies, etc.

As for attempting to formally "monitor" your memory (RAM), that's something which i don't pay much attention to. If I've been doing a lot of photo editing and image retouching as well as other things and I notice that the machine seems to be slowing down, not handling the functions as quickly, then a simple reboot takes care of that. Ditto if I've been watching a movie or two and also doing some tinkering in iTunes; at the point where I see that iTunes is balking a bit, again a reboot refreshes the RAM and we're back in business.

Macs are not Windows machines; they don't need a lot of "monitoring" and extra third-party software, etc., to ensure that they are running smoothly. They do quite nicely on their own without all that and in fact some third-party software which is supposed to be helpful actually is more of a hindrance than a help and beyond that, some can actually be more harmful than helpful. We've had this discussion before, actually.....
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
I think I will have to reply with certain parts after the official release of the new OS. However, I think I have one answer to your questions.

Screen Shot 2018-08-03 at 11.43.59 PM.png

If I need to tell you something else, please let me know. Thank you.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors Core
Yes, undoubtedly performance in general would improve if you were to add another 4 GB RAM, making 8 GB RAM in your machine. You probably would not need 16 GB and I'm not sure that your machine would be able to accept it. Just be sure you check compatibility through Crucial or another website before purchasing and installing (or having it purchased and installed for you).

Since I am guessing that your current HDD is 500 GB, if that has been fine for you so far in terms of storage and such, probably replacing it with a 500 GB SSD would work out very nicely.

I imagine that if Apple follows its usual pattern, we'll be seeing the official launch of Mojave towards the end of September, after the initial excitement of iPhone release earlier in the month has calmed down somewhat.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
Thank you Clix Pix. I think I am going to wait until after the official release of the new OS. I actually have to wait for someone to be available if the fix is as easy as installing more memory and a new SSD. I am the wrong person to work Macs or computers internally. I know my way around Macs in terms of software, very nicely for an amateur. I just don't trust myself working with replacing parts. So, I have to wait. Getting the part I need is going to take time because, like I said before, I am unable to drive.

I had a friend who used to work on Macs, but doesn't anymore. Another person who knows my issues thinks I should dump this Mac and go for a MBA. (This MBP will be six in December. I know it might be asking a lot, but I am pushing for ten years. :) I don't mind if I have to replace "small" parts here and there though.)

I take pretty good care of this MBP. As of right now, no obvious dings. I've always taken good care of my electronics... my house is known to be the "black hole of electronics". We have had our share of bad luck with electronics or even appliances. :confused:
 

Clix Pix

macrumors Core
Years ago I did things like replacing RAM, installing a CD drive when they were first new on the market, adding drives (to a Mac Pro), etc., but these days I am perfectly happy to let someone else do that or simply purchase a new machine with the specs I want, especially since the newer MBPs don't have user-replaceable parts. My current 2015 MBP is ticking along nicely and I use external drives not only for backup purposes but also to keep a lot of folders and files handy but not taking up space on the internal SSD. At the time I purchased it I went with 16 GB RAM, as I am a believer in having as much RAM as possible, especially since I knew I would not be able to later add more RAM myself. I'm glad that I followed that strategy!

I'd be surprised if you are still using that mid-2012 MBP four years from now!.....for one thing, it may not be able to go beyond Mojave as the OS, and also when Apple "obsoletes" a machine (which is usually at the six-or-seven-year point) then it no longer has parts available to send to repair shops and parts distributors....which can be a problem if someone needs to repair an older machine and replace one or two parts. Something to keep in mind.....

Also, newer machines are going to take advantage of new technology and new software in ways that an older machine simply cannot, and it could be an exercise in frustration trying to work on a machine which really has seen its best days a long time ago.

I am inclined to agree with the person who is suggesting that you move on from your current 2012 MBP and look into getting a MacBook Air -- especially since right now they are reasonably priced and still offer the "legacy" ports and MagSafe, which many users still prefer as opposed to the current line of MBPs with the Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports and no MagSafe. Because it has a SSD it will be much faster than your current machine, and also it will have more RAM, with options to configure the machine to your needs. The MBA does not have a retina screen, though, and that may be important to you. Much depends, of course, on what you need and want in a computer and what you need it to be able to do for you. Probably in a couple of months we will have an idea about what Apple's plans are for the MBA line and whether or not it will be dramatically changed or eliminated altogether with something else replacing it. Some people are going ahead and getting an MBA now so that they don't have to worry about it suddenly disappearing in a few months.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
I'd be surprised if you are still using that mid-2012 MBP four years from now!
Believe it or not, I kind of want to hang on to this MBP and just upgrade things like memory. I am hoping to hang on to this MBP until something really bad happens. What would a really expensive fix and I would be better off upgrading to a MBP?
for one thing, it may not be able to go beyond Mojave as the OS, and also when Apple "obsoletes" a machine (which is usually at the six-or-seven-year point) then it no longer has parts available to send to repair shops and parts distributors....which can be a problem if someone needs to repair an older machine and replace one or two parts. Something to keep in mind.....
Can I keep updated on the status of my machine in terms of age and vintage status?

Also, newer machines are going to take advantage of new technology and new software in ways that an older machine simply cannot, and it could be an exercise in frustration trying to work on a machine which really has seen its best days a long time ago.
Believe it or not, I agree. I just couldn't fit a new machine in my budget at the time. :/

I am inclined to agree with the person who is suggesting that you move on from your current 2012 MBP and look into getting a MacBook Air -- especially since right now they are reasonably priced and still offer the "legacy" ports and MagSafe, which many users still prefer as opposed to the current line of MBPs with the Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports and no MagSafe. Because it has a SSD it will be much faster than your current machine, and also it will have more RAM, with options to configure the machine to your needs. The MBA does not have a retina screen, though, and that may be important to you. Much depends, of course, on what you need and want in a computer and what you need it to be able to do for you. Probably in a couple of months we will have an idea about what Apple's plans are for the MBA line and whether or not it will be dramatically changed or eliminated altogether with something else replacing it. Some people are going ahead and getting an MBA now so that they don't have to worry about it suddenly disappearing in a few months.
I'm not sure if you've followed my postings about having a medical condition or not, but it can go bad on a drop of a hat. I mean I could be fine one second and the next second it's life threatening. I am optimistic I will be able to hit a personal goal in December (the 29th). Though, because of my medical condition, my life is far from what I would like it to be. (Please don't ask about it. :/)

Yes, I admit, I have made more calls to :Apple: in the past year or so than I had with my first MBP. In all this one is actually more dependable than my old one.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors Core
Usually information about status of Macs is available through Apple or right here on MR:

https://www.macrumors.com/2018/07/18/2012-15-inch-rmbp-not-vintage-til-end-of-2018/

In the case of the mid-2012 15" MBP Apple originally announced that it was now "vintage," but then corrected that status in a later announcement, which is quoted above in the link I've provided. I think the date that a product goes "vintage" or "obsolete" is predicated upon the last date that model was available for sale, so in the case of the mid-2012, six years from the last time one could purchase it as an active Apple product in the marketplace (i.e., on the Apple website or in Apple retail stores as a current model). This applies to the 15" MBP; I am not sure about the status of the mid-2012 2013" MBP.
 

MBAir2010

macrumors 603
May 30, 2018
6,433
5,923
there
what do you do?
me
i photoshop, photoedit, draw, surf the web, listen to my music on iTunes via airport, check email , import and export images all on my Macbook air 2010 with 4 gb ram using el capitan pretty smoothly. the fan run more nowadays because the weather is a stifling 96º so i close the lid and rest my eyes for a while.

So,i vote for upgrading what you have
 
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Clix Pix

macrumors Core
With all due respect, ExpoBill, this, MacRumors, is a discussion forum site, not a chat room, which on the internet is actually something else entirely. Secondly, since the OP is already participating in the public beta testing of Mojave on her mid-2012 MacBook Pro, I doubt that she is interested in reverting to Snow Leopard, regardless if she even used it at the time her machine was new. Whether or not anyone likes it, Apple is continuing to move forward with its hardware and software, including the latest version of its OS. Mojave will be making its debut probably in September and the newest MacBook Pros have already been launched. Customers have the option, of course, whether or not to move into the future with Apple.....
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
I was wondering what ExpoBill was talking about..... I won't revert to older OS's. I can't wait until the official release of the new OS. Even if I don't have everything I need updated. (I am thinking it's just going to be a new SSD and more memory. Totally affordable for the time being.) I will wait until after the release of the new OS.

On the upside, I don't remember if I mentioned this here or not and if it was related to the BETA or not, but I was typing something and the words I typed in didn't show up until two seconds later. I wasn't sure if it was a BETA fluke or if it was a fluke on my MBP, it hasn't happened for a while.
 

MBAir2010

macrumors 603
May 30, 2018
6,433
5,923
there
my post was generally be happy what you have if that mac performa all your needs.
if the machine still can perform daily tasks, why upgrade?

we are blindly lead to think buying new apple products will make us better, and the MBP 2018 should be a litmus paper on how wrong that can be.

i also mention a references to another thread as an example were people still use snow leopard everyday for work.
and technology is a constant science. i did not say "GET SNOW LEOPARD" but don't feel you MUST have the latest OS X to perform your tasks, a m-K.

i hope this helps.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
I'm on the BETA program version 10.14 BETA (18353d). I was planning on waiting until after the official release of Mojave so I can update everything then I will replace the HDD (with and SSD) and upgrade my memory.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,453
111
You will LOVE the speediness of an SSD!!!! Your machine will feel better than new, seriously...... Ditto with adding more RAM as well. Both will be good moves.
I just saw this, but right now my MBP (running on BETA version Mojave 10.14)
 
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