Upgrading an older 2.16Ghz C2D

d4nn0

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 15, 2005
32
0
Canada
Hi all,

I currently run an early-2006 A1211 model to do mostly web-development work, and a bit of other applications such as video production for school.

Although I've never really had performance issues with the machine, I'm starting to get a little tired of waiting for operations to complete while running Dreamweaver & Photoshop/Illustrator CS4 at the same time, and am starting to itch for an upgrade.

Unfortunately, cash is a little tight right now, so it looks like getting a new machine is out of the question. Since I'd like to avoid a loan, I'm looking at putting in 4GB (2x2GB) dual channel RAM, and buying a new battery to add to the upgrade to a 320GB HD I did a little while ago.

I'm pretty sure I know the answer, but I wanted to get some second opinions, so, do you guys believe this is the smart way to go? I'd like to avoid taking out a loan, but don't want to throw ~$200 down the toilet if I'll have to get a new one soon anyway.

Thanks in advance!
 

416049

macrumors 68000
Mar 14, 2010
1,844
2
Seems fine. The battery isn't such a bad idea if you keep both you can have 8h of battery life.
 

iBookG4user

macrumors 604
Jun 27, 2006
6,595
2
Seattle, WA
You need to clarify what computer you have. As the early 2006 MacBook Pro is a Core Duo and the late 2006 model is a Core 2 Duo. The former can accommodate 2GB of RAM and the later 3GB.
 

TopHatPlus

macrumors 6502
Aug 1, 2010
441
0
Southern Ontario
any upgrades would be a good upgrade, obviously a new one is sweet but if you are happy with it i see no reason =D just chucked $75 at my 2007 2.16 ghz =D haha love it
 

Animalk

macrumors 6502
May 27, 2007
458
2
Montreal Canada
Over the last two years I have upgraded my identical machine with a faster and larger hard drive, I have installed 4GB of RAM and I have just recently reapplied thermal paste on the chips.

I guess the only step left to take for me in the coming years is to install an SSD.

The weakest part of my machine is the graphics card which I can do nothing about unfortunately.

It still runs really well :)
 

aethelbert

macrumors 601
Jun 1, 2007
4,288
0
Chicago, IL, USA
You need to clarify what computer you have. As the early 2006 MacBook Pro is a Core Duo and the late 2006 model is a Core 2 Duo. The former can accommodate 2GB of RAM and the later 3GB.
The Core 2 machine will be able to use 3.3, so assuming that the extra RAM would actually be used, the extra .3GB and the dual channel support should show an improvement.

There shouldn't really be that much of a difference in price these days, anyway.
 

iBookG4user

macrumors 604
Jun 27, 2006
6,595
2
Seattle, WA
The Core 2 machine will be able to use 3.3, so assuming that the extra RAM would actually be used, the extra .3GB and the dual channel support should show an improvement.

There shouldn't really be that much of a difference in price these days, anyway.
I rounded. But my point was that the OP should clarify, because if they have the Core Duo MacBook Pro, then they would be wasting their money on 4GB of RAM.
 

aethelbert

macrumors 601
Jun 1, 2007
4,288
0
Chicago, IL, USA
I rounded. But my point was that the OP should clarify, because if they have the Core Duo MacBook Pro, then they would be wasting their money on 4GB of RAM.
From the OP's signature, it says Core 2, so I'd go with late 06. A1211 is also the same part number on my receipt for the late 2006 run.
 

d4nn0

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 15, 2005
32
0
Canada
It is indeed a C2D, currently with 2x1GB unmatched sticks... I guess that's where I'm hoping the big performance boost will come. I can remember switching to dual-channel on my desktop PC years ago, and being pleasantly surprised by the increase in performance in Warcraft III =P

I have just recently reapplied thermal paste on the chips.
Animalk, did you notice a decrease in temps? Increase in performance? Was it worth the complete "teardown"?

Thanks for everyone's thoughts so far!
 

cherry su

macrumors 65816
Feb 28, 2008
1,217
1
Reapplying the thermal paste means lower fan speeds, but warmer enclosure. The paste is getting more heat off the proc and onto the heatpipes, which come in direct contact with the case. I somewhat wish I realized this before I redid the thermal paste on my Core Duo MacBook Pro.
 
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