Upgrading Mac Pro 4,1 to 2 x 3.46ghz (X5690)

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by tpivette89, May 15, 2018.

  1. tpivette89, May 15, 2018
    Last edited: May 15, 2018

    tpivette89 macrumors member

    tpivette89

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2018
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    #1
    Decided to take the plunge after picking up a DP 4,1 a few weeks ago. It was the base model 2 x 2.26 8 core machine, and came equipped with 12GB of RAM. Immediately, I ordered 6 sticks of 4GB 1333mhz RAM. Now the machine had 24GB. So far, so good.

    I had a single X5690 in another 4,1 (a single processor model) that I decided to pirate, and then ordered a second on eBay for $100 shipped. After about 2 weeks, the new (to me) X5690 arrived from China, and I began the teardown.

    IMG_0519.jpg
    Got the tray out, and removed the heatsinks.

    IMG_0521.jpg
    I didn't know that there were small spacers on top of the CPUs in the DP setups. Interesting.

    IMG_0522.jpg
    De-lidded the pair of X5690s using the vice only technique. This process took less than 5 minutes, and was super easy. I had 100% success with this procedure, and it was my first time doing it. Highly recommended to anyone on the fence about de-lidding their own CPUs... DO NOT pay someone $70+ to do this for you!
    --- Post Merged, May 15, 2018 ---
    IMG_0524.jpg
    Using a razor blade, I carefully removed the gasket and thermal material from the processors. Then, cleaned them up with isopropyl alcohol, and gave them a quick blast with compressed air.

    IMG_0526.jpg
    Installed the CPUS, put the spacers back on, and began to tighten the heatsinks. I tightened them in an X pattern, switching screws every few turns until I felt resistance. Then, I gave them an extra 1/8 turn and started on the next heatsink. After that one became tight, I went back to the first one and they had loosened up a bit, so I gave them another 1/8 turn each and repeated the process to the second one. Keep in mind, I used very little effort to tighten these screws as I had heard horror stories. Finally, everything was done and put back in the Mac Pro.

    Powered up the machine, and was treated with a reassuring bong. "About this Mac" recognized both new CPUs, and the RAM had been bumped from 1066mhz, to 1333mhz. Immediately, I fired up Geekbench and ran the CPU test. For comparison, here's what the machine did before the upgrade (2 x 2.26ghz 4 core CPUs):
    IMG_0529.jpg

    And here is what my single processor Mac Pro scored with the X5690:
    IMG_0530.jpg

    And finally, the results of the 2 x 3.46ghz 6 core processors:
    IMG_0528.jpg

    So, my single-core score increased about 900 points, while the multi-core score leaped ahead by almost 12000 points. Unfortunately, the single-core scores were lower than the single X5690, but I did increase the multi-core score over that setup as well. All in all, it was a worthy upgrade that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend to anyone with a 4,1 or 5,1 machine. This will undoubtably increase the lifespan of this computer.

    Anyone need a pair of E5520s?
     
  2. joot macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
  3. ActionableMango macrumors G3

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #3
    Just a head's up. If your experience with two X5690 CPUs is like mine (and a couple of other people), the Mac Pro fan behavior will be inconsistently wonky and you'll need to install fan control software.
     
  4. tpivette89 thread starter macrumors member

    tpivette89

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2018
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    #4
    Yikes! I haven’t heard of this issue before. I had the machine running for a few minutes doing light tasks and so far so good.
     
  5. tomscott1988 macrumors 6502

    tomscott1988

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #5
    Ive got the 3.46 W and its showing its age... super slow on the majority of programs these days. Especially CC, lightroom is such a pain to use. Its sat in the corner looking sad for itself.
     
  6. bsbeamer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    #6
    Believe the fan behavior may be on 4,1>5,1 machines. I'm running an authentic 5,1 with dual X5690 and have not run into this issue on this machine. Several client machines that I've worked on are 4,1>5,1 and they have used fan control software.
     
  7. ActionableMango macrumors G3

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #7
    That was true in my case (4,1).

    The fan was fine 99% of the time but there were certain specific applications where, if they hammered the CPU, would cause CPU ramp up to ridiculously high speeds even though the temperature wasn't very high. And then the fan speeds wouldn't go back down until many minutes after the load stopped and long after temperatures had returned to normal.
     
  8. barmann macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Location:
    Germany
    #8
    You might have hardware issues, or with your program configurations or OSX .
    Lightroom has always been a pig, but even current versions shouldn't be slow on a cMP as described in your sig .
     
  9. tomscott1988 macrumors 6502

    tomscott1988

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #9
    Nothing wrong with the machine. Im a photographer by trade, edit hundreds of images a week spend about half my week infront of it and they aren't practical as daily workhorses anymore. I replaced it with a dual xeon dell workstation a few years ago because of lack of Apple options. Runs rings round it almost 0 lag, I find CC seems to run a bit better on W10 especially with the availability of CUDA cards.

    Its not a bad upgrade for the cost these days but they aren't fast machines anymore, not bad for 10 years old but they are coming to the end of the road.
     
  10. Surrat macrumors 6502

    Surrat

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Location:
    United States
    #10
    Something to keep in mind is that the SMC fan and power control system in the dual cpu 2009-2012 mac pros is only setup for max 95 watt cpu's.
    The X5690 are 130 watts each, this probably causes the strange behavior under high load.

    On my upgraded mac pro's, I have kept to the 95 watt limits, meaning the X5675 6 core 3.06ghz, or the X5672 4 core 3.2ghz. I have had no fan weirdness so far with these processors.
     
  11. h9826790 macrumors G3

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #11
    Since only the 2009 flashed 5,1 users report the fans issue. I suspect when Apple working on the 2010 Mac Pro, they actually try dual 130W CPU options, which makes the SMC can support that. But may be something like fan noise not up to their standard (clearly cooling is not a problem if the fan spin up), therefore, they give up this options, but the SMC still support that.
     
  12. tpivette89 thread starter macrumors member

    tpivette89

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2018
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    #12
    Quick question... does the Mac Pro favor one CPU socket over another when it tests the single core for Geekbench? If so, is out socket A or B?
     

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