"USB Over Current" warnings worse in Leopard than Tiger

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by dappledandy, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. dappledandy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    #1
    Here's a tricky one:

    Just bought a 2006 MacBook Pro

    2.16GHz, 2GB Ram, 120 GB HD (hard drive will be updated as soon as I solve this problem)

    It came with an openly disclosed problem: a consistent "USB Over Current" error message popping onto screen. (yes, I've read relevant threads and tried resetting PRAM, etc, as did the guy from whom I purchased it). The guy from whom I purchased it was told by a friend in IT that it needs a new USB hub (and that might be correct).

    According to the guy and from what I've so far experienced, the USB drives function -- the only problem is the error message. I have to mention that these error messages occur without anything connected externally.

    I used the system disks to perform a hardware test, and also to re-install Tiger (a downgrade from Leopard).


    FIRST CLUE -- the Hardware Test

    When I perform the "Apple Hardware Test" (version 3A107) the short version shows "no errors" but the extended version gets stuck on "testing memory" (according to the progress bar)

    The screen bounces (shimmies) but I believe the error code is:

    0x80000009

    And:

    "ERROR: 0x80000009 requested size: 0xaf

    and then another with 0xa4

    and another with 0xa4 again

    HOWEVER, when the test concludes (in a length of time much greater than its 10-minute estimate), the official word is that there is no hardware problem. (The two RAM modules are the ones specified, and resetting them and removing one did not alleviate the problem).

    SECOND CLUE -- Almost no Problem in Tiger

    The interesting thing is that with Tiger installed, I got the USB Over Current warning only upon the initial boot. I thought I had just about cured the problem.

    THIRD CLUE -- Re-installing Leopard

    I took my commercial copy of Leopard and reinstalled. It was interesting that according to what I was seeing onscreen, the installation stalled with 7 minutes to go. But when I rebooted from the start-up disk -- there was Leopard. (Could it have been only partially installed?)

    Unfortunately, I didn't see how the computer was running before updating to 10.5.8.

    FOURTH CLUE -- Software Updates

    The "USB Over Current Warning" now come in cascades of five. And the barrages are frequent. Again, however, they don't seem to do anything except block screen view.

    I'm wondering if something in the updates has exacerbated the problem? Here are the updates:

    "Pages Update" (2.0.1v2)
    "Keynote Update" (3.0.1v2)
    "QuickTime" (7.6.9)
    "GarageBand Update" (3.0.2)
    "iDVD Update" (6.0.4)
    "iWeb Update" (1.1.1)
    "iTunes" (10.2)
    "iMovie HD Combo Update" (6.0.2)
    "iPhoto Update" (6.0.4)
    "Mac OS X Update Combined" (10.5.8)

    Okay, that's the relevant info. I would gladly replace the USB hub, if there's a video that shows how and I know what part to purchase.

    Otherwise, what would you do?

    Thanks to all who've taken time to analyze this situation.

    Kind regards,

    Terry D
     
  2. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #2
    Everything is soldered onto the logic board, you cannot replace what you call the USB hub. You need a brand new logic board if this is indeed a hardware problem, and those are quite costly. I believe they are around 700 dollars.
     
  3. MacTower macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Location:
    Midwest
    #3
    Many of the components of Apple portables are connected internally via USB. This includes the keyboard, trackpad, iSight camera, Bluetooth and IR receiver.

    You might check to see if one of these internal devices is malfunctioning by process of elimination.

    You can also download the Apple Developer Tools and use the 'USB Prober' application that comes with that package to gain insight into which device might be causing the problem.

    If it is being caused by something on the logic board, however, the chances of fixing it are pretty slim.
     

Share This Page