USB Type-C to Micro-B 3.1 Cable: Any suggestions?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by esskay, Aug 19, 2017.

  1. esskay macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #1
    I got a new MBPr15tb. I have several USB 3 portable hard drives which have USB Micro-B connectors on them. So I need USB Type-C to Micro-B 3.1 cables to connect them directly.

    Example: AmazonBasics cable https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-Type-C-Micro-B-Gen2-Cable/dp/B01GGKYIHS

    I've read about the inconsistent quality of USB-C cables out there, and found that Google Engineer Benson Leung is renowned for his USB-C cable testing.

    Unfortunately, he doesn't seem to have tested any Type-C to Micro-B cables.

    Does anyone know of a specific cable like this that's been tested to similar standards as Benson Leung is known for?

    Thanks in advance!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Gjwilly macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #2
    I just looked at that cable for the same usage but ended up getting the ones from Cable Matters.
    As for the Benson Leung style reviews I think the biggest concern there is power transmission and being sure that whatever you're hooking up via USB-C doesn't try to demand too much power and end up damaging your ports. I could be wrong but I don't think that applies so much in our cases.
     
  3. esskay thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #3
    Thanks for your input!

    Why did you end up choosing the Cable Matters cable? I noticed that the AmazonBasics has the USB-IF certification while it wasn't clear if the CableMatters does.

    Wirecutters also had recommendations on a bunch of USB C cable types -- except for micro-B cables... :( They cited some data rate testing too; despite the spec, there seemed to be variation on that.
     
  4. aldenh, Aug 19, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2017

    aldenh macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2012
    #4

    I ordered one on amazon from cablecreations has pretty good reviews and Benson Leung left a review too so go trough it. Unfortunately didn't have time to test it myself. Here is the link https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B012...lecreation&dpPl=1&dpID=31fiSpVay3L&ref=plSrch
     
  5. esskay thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #5
    Thanks for the suggestion. I looked at Benson's review shown there, and he actually reviewed the adapter with a female socket, not the cable with male ends, which is what I'm seeking. Not sure how many Amazon listings seem to morph a bit, where past reviews aren't necessarily exactly aligned with the current product listings.

    I'm not sure whether Brandon's recommendations can be safely extrapolated to other products from the same brand.
    --- Post Merged, Aug 19, 2017 ---
    BTW, one advantage I noticed on the Cable Matters product is a lifetime warranty, whereas Amazon Basics is only one year.
     
  6. Gormur, Mar 21, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018

    Gormur macrumors newbie

    Gormur

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Location:
    Iceland
    #6
    --- Post Merged, Mar 21, 2018 ---
    I am able to connect a LaCie Minimus USB3.0 https://www.lacie.com/lacie-content/datasheet/DSS_Minimus_USB3_EN.pdf to my MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports) running High Sierra 10.13.3 Using the original Apple Adapter that came with my laptop. https://www.apple.com/shop/product/MJ1M2AM/A/usb-c-to-usb-adapter

    This is however, not possible using this adapter from TOPK https://www.aliexpress.com/item/TOP...32816279064.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.h6d3CM
     
  7. hallux macrumors 68030

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #7
    @esskay @Gjwilly is essentially correct. A device that charges over USB-C has the potential to damage a USB-A host device or charger if the negotiation goes bad due to poor design/build of the cable. Whether by design (to make people think they were getting "rapid charging") or by accident (because they didn't know better), cable manufacturers were building and selling cables that "tricked" the device being charged into thinking the host could provide as much power as it wanted to draw, possibly damaging the host by drawing too heavily on the port. In this case, the USB-C port can likely provide more power than your drive could ever request so there's little risk.
     

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