All iPads USB voltage reader

eclipse01

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May 16, 2011
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I saw somewhere that the new bricks that come with IPP's are 19w (or something). I tried using just a usb C to USB-A cord and noticed it charged REALLY slow.

My question is how can i see like the voltage something is putting out so i can see real time scenery? (different charging speeds for using different sized bricks, like the one that comes with the old ipads/iphones)
 

Lobwedgephil

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Apr 7, 2012
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The new iPad Pro ships with a 18 W charger, the previous iPad Pro was 12 W. iPhone comes with 5 W. So yes, will be very slow unless you use the 18 W charger, or the upgraded chargers from Apple are even faster.
 

eclipse01

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but i have a usb C that is direct to a usb port in a wall (no adapters at all being used)

still charges slow

also I heard from another thread there is a faster option using usb C to 3.1.
 

chris_b

macrumors newbie
Jan 30, 2017
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but i have a usb C that is direct to a usb port in a wall (no adapters at all being used)

still charges slow

also I heard from another thread there is a faster option using usb C to 3.1.
You mean you are using a USB-C to USB-A cable, and the A end goes into the wall? You will need to look up the wall outlet data sheet to see if it even supports higher watt options from 5W.
 
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eclipse01

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You mean you are using a USB-C to USB-A cable, and the A end goes into the wall? You will need to look up the wall outlet data sheet to see if it even supports higher watt options from 5W.
Thanks on that note, what about if I use the apple supplied USB C to USB C and plug it straight into a USB C port in a PC?

(last scenario I promise)
 

DeltaMac

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Jul 30, 2003
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The 18W adapter, for the iPad Pro, would be rated at more than 3.5 amps.
That in-wall USB are likely maximum 2.1 amps (at least those that I have seen.
(There is an adapter, it's just built-in (not visible to you), but something has to adapt the line voltage to the 5VDC used for charging.)
So, 67% power, nominal 2.1 amps or thereabouts, available for the new iPad that wants that full 3.5 amps for charging - yes, it would be a little slow.
 

chris_b

macrumors newbie
Jan 30, 2017
25
25
Thanks on that note, what about if I use the apple supplied USB C to USB C and plug it straight into a USB C port in a PC?

(last scenario I promise)
Depends on the port. Not all will offer higher wattages or the specific power profile needed by the iPad to perform fast charging.

For example, a 2016 MacBook can do 15W on the USB-C/TB ports: https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/323199/whats-the-maximum-power-delivery-in-macbook-pro-2016-2017-thunderbolt-3-ports
 
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Azathoth123

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Sep 13, 2018
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Try the Apple charger and Apple cable.

IIRC, to take advantage of the Power Delivery fast charging on Apple products (that support fast charging) you will need a USB-C Apple charger that supports PD and a genuine Apple cable, USB-C to Lightning or USB-C.
 
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eclipse01

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Try the Apple charger and Apple cable.

IIRC, to take advantage of the Power Delivery fast charging on Apple products (that support fast charging) you will need a USB-C Apple charger that supports PD and a genuine Apple cable, USB-C to Lightning or USB-C.
Thanks according to my motherboard specs it says 36 watts of charging :)
 

masotime

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Jun 24, 2012
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San Jose, CA
I saw somewhere that the new bricks that come with IPP's are 19w (or something). I tried using just a usb C to USB-A cord and noticed it charged REALLY slow.

My question is how can i see like the voltage something is putting out so i can see real time scenery? (different charging speeds for using different sized bricks, like the one that comes with the old ipads/iphones)
The cord is only one part of the equation. Particularly for USB-C PD, your USB-A port is not going to be able to deliver more than 12W. It is probably delivering 5W based on your description. Note that Qualcomm quick charge specifications are completely incompatible with USB-C PD.

You will need:
  • USB-C output port
  • Support for Power Delivery spec (make sure the product specs mention this)
  • 15V output support and at least 2A current at that voltage.

Apple’s included charger only supports 9V @ 2A, so 18W max.
 
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