Used Bike Advice?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by JurgenWigg, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. JurgenWigg macrumors 6502

    JurgenWigg

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Location:
    Delaware
    #1
    With the gas prices spiking, i'm looking at using public transportation to get to work, and getting a road bike to get to the public transportation. Thing is, I don't know all that much about road bike. I have a mountain bike that i used to get around college and go trail riding on the weekends and all, but for doing the kinds of distances that I'm considering, a road bike would really be the way to go.

    Thing is, they're expensive, so I'm looking at the used market. Just don't really know what i'm looking for.

    I found this used Peugot bike, 1977 10-speed, any thoughts on it? http://delaware.craigslist.org/bik/2222684541.html

    Any general advice on what I should be looking for or tips on road biking?
     
  2. JurgenWigg thread starter macrumors 6502

    JurgenWigg

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Location:
    Delaware
    #2
    Really? 100 views and not so much as a snarky quip? MR, you disappoint me.
     
  3. michael.lauden macrumors 68020

    michael.lauden

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    #3
    Let me save you.

    The bike looks to be in good condition. It will be steel, which is a lot heavier, and subject to rust. Cheaper bikes are still made from steel, although in the +350$ range they will most likely be aluminum, and above +600$ will go into the carbon fiber fork/seat posts, then above +800$ will go into full carbon fiber.

    You shouldn't have any problems with the shifting - these older bikes use 'friction shifting', as opposed to indexed shifting (i.e the ones with the 'click'). You find the gears 'manually' with friction shifting.

    I can see right now that the handlebars are at the wrong angle, the stem is quite long (but has to be a decent length to give room for the shifters), and that the brake levers are a little low for my taste - but these are extremely easy fixes.

    I think it's quite odd that they didn't include a size. You definitely need to find out the frame size before making any decisions. There are various sources online to find your correct height - but if you pretend to be interested most bikes shops will do a 'rough' fitting to see which size frame you should be sitting on. Professional fittings are ~200$. Correct riding height will have your knee bending at a 20-30 degree angle, you should have a slight bend in your arms with your hands on the hoods as well. It gets a little bit more in depth than that on pro fittings, but I won't go into that.

    Also, keep in mind that these are probably 27" wheels and 1" tires. Nowadays all road wheels are 700c and the most popular road tire is probably around 23C - a quite bit skinnier than the 27x1's. The brakes on these older bikes don't stop as well either - in the rain you'll be wanting to jump off - something I experienced on my old 77' fuji I restored last year (even with new pads).

    Anyways. As a lasting impression - remember that there is a difference between being 'vintage' and being 'old'. I think you could get a much nicer, newer bike - that would climb hills easier, and get you going faster for a little more. Go ride a few bikes at a shop, and then decide if you want to go the old route.

    Just make sure the bike FITS!
     
  4. goodtimes5 macrumors 6502a

    goodtimes5

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #4
    If you want distance, get a bike that's comfortable and reliable. That craigslist bike does not look like it'll fit your needs.

    If you think you'll get into road biking, I'd highly recommend going big with your first purchase and get a nice bike. Otherwise, you'll end up wasting money in the end constantly upgrading to a nicer bike.
     
  5. michael.lauden macrumors 68020

    michael.lauden

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    #5
    +1, although I am riding a 1991 Trek 1000 that I got for 200$ last year. Put over 3,000 miles on it. Needless to say - literally everything has broken on it.

    Tubes (obv)
    Tires (obv)
    Spokes
    SADDLES (from a fall)
    R Der
    F Der
    Left Crank
    Bottom Bracket
    Hubs
    Freewheel

    plus it has gross Suntour on it, and the width in the back isn't enough to upgrade to even a 9. No sense in dishing out $$ for 1 extra speed (from 7 to 8).

    Anyways. It does its job for the time being. If you can afford it - get something that will LAST.

    Would you buy a mac from 1977?

    I'm a bike tech so it wasn't a big deal for me - for someone else... would have definitely sucked
     
  6. JurgenWigg thread starter macrumors 6502

    JurgenWigg

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Location:
    Delaware
    #6
    Thanks for the tips! Definitely some handy info. I know a good bike shop near me is having a sale coming up next weekend - I'll definitely check it out. Sounds like a newer bike would be better for my needs right now.
     
  7. Gonzo3333 macrumors 6502a

    Gonzo3333

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #7
    That thing probably weighs about 40-50 lbs. Do yourself a favor and get something a little bit more modern, not just for safety but reliability and less frustration. Finding parts for an older bike can be a real pain in the butt. Check out some bike shops and look at some of last years models, then check out Craigslist for something a decade or two newer. That price for $150 is also hilarious. I would not pay more than $20 for that bike.
     
  8. michael.lauden macrumors 68020

    michael.lauden

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    #8
    It highly doubt that it weighs 50 pounds, but it's probably upper 30s. Finding parts for these won't be too bad either. Parts are readily available, and the fact that they are friction shifters makes the whole thing that much easier to repair.

    150$ is definitely over priced. 20$ is a bit of a low ball - it is at least worth 75$, even for the OP's needs.
     

Share This Page