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klspahr

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 30, 2013
104
183
Central PA
The sleep data collection is pretty cool, but can anyone explain how they have used the data to improve their quality of sleep?

Reports on the quality of your sleep is a first step but what else can be learned? I’m really curious how I can improve my sleep with this data.
 
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Luis Ortega

macrumors 65816
May 10, 2007
1,174
355
You would need to do something with it, like changing some habit before sleeping, and seeing if it affected the sleep stages.
It’s just data.
 
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klspahr

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 30, 2013
104
183
Central PA
Of course, I did a web search looking for specific strategies for better sleep using Apple Watch data, got a big-ol-zip. When I read the articles they either had no examples or they just spit out the same old suggestions they were giving years before the Apple Watch was around. Not one personal account of results. Yet you can find many articles of how crystals solves all problems. What a world we live in - the quacks are taking over.

I was thinking about getting a watch but I can't see any real reason for collecting data because you can.

One would think they could find just few stories about HOW people actually used this data for better sleep...
 
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Thomas Davie

macrumors 6502a
Jan 20, 2004
715
496
I have improved my sleep somewhat. being able to show my sleep data to medical staff has led to medication changes for me. That’s about all I expected going in, and it has paid off.

tom
 
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Mackilroy

macrumors 68040
Jun 29, 2006
3,976
745
You can (with third-party apps) keep track of the quality of your sleep, get recommendations on when to go to bed to get sufficient rest, and combined with HRV and RHR see how prepared you are to tackle the next day. Sleep data alone is fine, but you need more to make it really useful. It’s also worth keeping track of your water intake, and your activity near bedtime. If you’re overly active or drink a lot around the time you go to bed, it’ll show up in your quality of sleep.
 

mlody

macrumors 68000
Nov 11, 2012
1,611
1,230
Windy City
I am skeptical that sleep tracking is any good or beneficial. I imagine that 10-15 mins read on how to improve sleep naturally is probably just as good as dealing with Apple Watch and trying to interpret any data it might give you. I cant imagine the that the watch would tell you anything new of any significant value, that you couldn't find not the internet, as it is not a medical device.
 
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Mackilroy

macrumors 68040
Jun 29, 2006
3,976
745
Reading on the Internet won't tell me how many times I wake up in the night, or for how long. Reading won't tell me my RHR, HRV, or even begin to guess at how much of my sleep was REM, deep, core, etc. As I said, sleep data alone is worth only so much - it needs paired with other information to become truly useful. I sleep more and better since I started tracking my sleep regularly - yes, some of that I could do without the watch, but far more of it would be manual instead of automatic.

As @Thomas Davie's experience shows, it doesn't need to be a 'medical device' to be of value.
 

mlody

macrumors 68000
Nov 11, 2012
1,611
1,230
Windy City
Reading on the Internet won't tell me how many times I wake up in the night, or for how long. Reading won't tell me my RHR, HRV, or even begin to guess at how much of my sleep was REM, deep, core, etc. As I said, sleep data alone is worth only so much - it needs paired with other information to become truly useful. I sleep more and better since I started tracking my sleep regularly - yes, some of that I could do without the watch, but far more of it would be manual instead of automatic.

True, it wont, but the thing is, for many people, data is not important if they just follow a dozen or so recommendations on how to improve the sleep. I dont need Apple Watch to recognize that I should not drink late at night, or eat, or have coffee, etc. Those are some well known and documented items to follow without needing or looking at any data. While seeing all the data might be cool, ultimately it comes down to following best practices for better sleep. If that does not work, I would recommend seeking professional help.
 

Mackilroy

macrumors 68040
Jun 29, 2006
3,976
745
Sure, you don’t need data, but if you have it, you can improve more quickly than going off vague feelings of improvement. Generic advice is a good baseline, but that’s all it is. Someone might handle late-night eating and drinking better than others, or perhaps they work night shifts, or they have a schedule that’s inconsistent because of work or health matters. Perhaps they’re training for an event, and need to hit certain sleep metrics in order to be prepared. All I’m challenging is your notion that because you can’t imagine why it might be useful, that there’s no significant value to it.
 
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Tdude96

macrumors 6502
Oct 16, 2021
451
687
The data's just data, you can make use of it, or just log it for later "just in case." If you were to go to a sleep specialist for a consult, you'd most likely be asked for a sleep log, and this data would serve that purpose quite well. A sleep specialist is likely to give precisely the same advice as what you'd find online about sleeping strategies, minus any old wives tales that make their way into those articles, and the specialist would probably have you try those strategies and keep a sleep log (this data) for X amount of time to see what works for you and what doesn't, switch out for other strategies to dial in what works.

I think it'd be nice if with on-device Apple Intelligence they could bring the various bits of Health data together to be more informative, make connections between sleep, work, exercise, heart rate, temperature, etc to give health insights and suggestions and warnings. It seems like most of the data is available, but a lot of people don't know how to connect with the data and make use of the large volume of data in an informed way that would allow them to take appropriate action.
 
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a_hammertime

macrumors newbie
Sep 13, 2022
3
4
I'd suggest using it for more long term help. Notice you're getting less sleep recently or waking up more each night? What changes have you made in your life that impact that? I've started using mine more frequently with the birth of our child less than two weeks ago. I get to see how much sleep he gives us and helps me plan for what sort of naps I might need during the day.
 

cjsuk

macrumors regular
Apr 30, 2024
203
731
The best way you can use the sleep data is to turn it off I found. It just worries me and I sleep better if I don't know or care about things.
 

Luis Ortega

macrumors 65816
May 10, 2007
1,174
355
I am skeptical that sleep tracking is any good or beneficial. I imagine that 10-15 mins read on how to improve sleep naturally is probably just as good as dealing with Apple Watch and trying to interpret any data it might give you. I cant imagine the that the watch would tell you anything new of any significant value, that you couldn't find not the internet, as it is not a medical device.
My wife has another brand watch and it kept documenting wild heart rate fluctuations at night and that prompted her to see a doctor who found she was suffering from afib, so it can provide a useful bit of data.
i was so impressed I went out and bought an Apple Watch.
 

alexsa

macrumors newbie
May 8, 2020
14
9
I had the Fitbit and that sleep data was really good and much more useful then Apple Watch. I actually miss that part of it.
 

wargamer6

macrumors member
Aug 27, 2010
69
114
True, it wont, but the thing is, for many people, data is not important if they just follow a dozen or so recommendations on how to improve the sleep. I dont need Apple Watch to recognize that I should not drink late at night, or eat, or have coffee, etc. Those are some well known and documented items to follow without needing or looking at any data. While seeing all the data might be cool, ultimately it comes down to following best practices for better sleep. If that does not work, I would recommend seeking professional help.

So don't use it. Problem solved.
 
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andyw715

macrumors 68000
Oct 25, 2013
1,837
1,402
Abnormally low respiratory rate during sleep can indicate sleep apnea (among other things). The graph is helpful....low followed by rapid - you may have stopped breathing, then faster breathing to get more oxygen.

Combine that with the O2 sensor
 
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