Using 10.5 to password protect folders??

Discussion in 'macOS' started by chris001, Mar 25, 2008.

  1. chris001 macrumors regular

    chris001

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #1
    hey guys.
    here is what i want to do.

    i have some files that my kids shouldn't be looking at =0
    i've hidden them but you know kids, they snoop, and it isn't hard for kids these days to find things.

    so, i would like to know how to password protect a folder.
    ie.
    a folder in Documents titled "Folder A"
    is there a way, that if i click on Folder A it will ask me for a password before i can open that folder?

    i know you can do something like this using the built in features of 10.5 without downloading apps.

    thanks.
     
  2. gauchogolfer macrumors 603

    gauchogolfer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Location:
    American Riviera
    #2
    The way to do this is to make an encrypted disk image, then drop the folder into that image. In order to mount it you'll need to enter a password.

    You can make such an image using Disk Utility.
     
  3. killmoms macrumors 68040

    killmoms

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #3
    You can't password protect a folder, exactly.

    What you CAN do is create an encrypted, password-protected sparse disk image.

    Go to /Applications/Utilities and open Disk Utility. From there, go to the File Menu and choose New > Blank Disk Image...

    You'll want to set the size to as large as you think it will need to be to hold all the files you want to put in it (and any you might want to put in later). Set the encryption to AES-128 (or AES-256 if you're super paranoid, which will slow down access somewhat), and make sure the format is set as "sparse disc image" (which means it will expand in size consumed as you put in files, instead of taking up the maximum size you set above from the get-go).

    When you continue, Disk Utility will prompt you for the password you want to set for the disc image. What's most important to do here is to UNCHECK the checkbox that says "Remember password (add to Keychain)." Making sure that's unchecked means that every time you want to mount the image it will prompt you for the password. If it isn't entered successfully, the image will not mount, and will continue to be unreadable by anyone else (since it's encrypted).

    Then you can just drag files to it like it was a mounted volume. When you're done, eject it and all your files in it are secure.
     
  4. chris001 thread starter macrumors regular

    chris001

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #4
    thank you very much.
    this seems to have solved my problem.

    NOW, i messed up.
    i allocated too little space to the disk file.

    and i can't seem to delete it. as i want to make another disk that is bigger.

    how can i do this.
    i got into disk utility and select erase, but the disk image is still there.

    how do i get rid of it completely?
     
  5. xUKHCx Administrator emeritus

    xUKHCx

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Location:
    The Kop
    #5
    You need to select the .dmg in Finder rather than inside Disk Utility and delete it like you would any normal file/folder, just need to unmount it first.
     
  6. killmoms macrumors 68040

    killmoms

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #6
    A disk image is a file, you saved it somewhere. When you double click it, it appears like it's a mounted volume, but the data itself is in that .dmg (or in this case .sparseimage) file. You need to unmount the volume, and then go into the Finder and delete the file you created, wherever that is (drag it to the trash, empty the trash).
     
  7. chris001 thread starter macrumors regular

    chris001

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
  8. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #8
    You don't need to password protect the folder. All you need to do is disable read permission. If you right click on "get info" go to the bottom of the info folder and you can change read/write permision on the folder. Click the little gear and yo have to option to apply this to all contents of the folder and sub folders.

    Now the you will be able to see the folder and other users wil not be able to see it. It is actually password protected because the kid would have to know the password on your user login to access your account
     
  9. macsrules macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    #9
    ChrisA,

    Thats is a good solution. I am going to use that one myself. Good post.
     
  10. chris001 thread starter macrumors regular

    chris001

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #10
    i actually only have 1 account. i'm the primary user so my kids use them once in awhile. i bring it on trips, etc. or they use it when they need it. ( i don't even have a password on my account)

    i don't like having more then 1 account because at startup you must login before the desktop appears. and i don't liek that.. stupid i know. but i hate waiting as i turn on my macbook and walk away to get a drink or something.
     
  11. jeff111 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    #11
    Creating an password-protected disk image on an external hard drive.

    The below information is perfect but I tried it on an external hard drive and it doesn't seem to work.
    Is it possible to create a disc image on an external hard drive and if not, how can I have a folder on an X-HD that is not accessible to anyone but me?

    Thanks


     

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