Using a 1GBps Fibre plan but speeds like this...?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Beeplance, Jul 26, 2015.

  1. Beeplance macrumors 65816

    Beeplance

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Location:
    Singapore
    #1
    Hi all, I recently subscribed for a 1GBps Fibre plan from my carrier, along with purchasing an ASUS RT-AC87U router to go along with the plan so as to create a home Wifi system. My carrier sent a person to install (more like connect) a 'Optical Network Terminal' (ONT) to my fibre-ready port at home, which I then connect to my new Router with a data cable. The person tested the internet before he left, and he was able to get around 950mbps (download) on Speedtest.net on his laptop using a internet cable, which meant the connection was good. Once installed, I went ahead to setup the router via its IP address, update it with the latest software patch, and my wifi was good to go.

    Being my first time using a wifi internet, everything seems fine. However, even on my 5Ghz connection, the fastest speed I was only able to get (download) was around 90mbps, never ever exceeding the 100mbps mark, and I had done the speed test 3 metres away from the router. I tried changing internet cables connecting the router and the ONT, but the results remain the same. I don't even want to mention the 2.4GHz connection speeds.

    I know for a fact that using a router reduces the internet speed that I will get as compared to using an internet cable, but less than 10% of the theoretical speed made me feel as if I didn't do something right. I checked on the internet, and people who used a 1GBps plan were able to pull down speeds comfortably over 100mbps on their 5GHz connection.

    Does anyone have any tips as to increase the speed of the connection? Is there something else that I should be aware of, or something that I missed out, something that I should've tweaked? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Spectrum Abuser macrumors 65816

    Spectrum Abuser

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    #2
    The channel that your router is using might be congested.

    What devices are you using to connect to the WiFi network?
     
  3. Suture macrumors 6502a

    Suture

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    #3
    You can use something like InSSIDer to take a look at the how many signals are in the air. I've used it in the past to troubleshoot dead spots in a 4-level home.
     
  4. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #4
    Going through the spec sheet on that router I found:

    802.11a : 6,9,12,18,24,36,48,54Mbps
    802.11b : 1, 2, 5.5, 11Mbps
    802.11g : 6,9,12,18,24,36,48,54Mbps
    802.11n : up to 450Mbps
    802.11n TurboQAM:up to600Mbps
    802.11ac: up to 1734Mbps

    So what can your device handle?
     
  5. Beeplance thread starter macrumors 65816

    Beeplance

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Location:
    Singapore
    #5
    The only devices the network is connected to are my iPhone 5C (connected to 5GHz) and my laptop (connected to 2.4GHz). The speeds I obtained were tested when only the iPhone was connected.

    My iPhone 5C should be able to support up to 802.11n, going by Apple's Technical Specifications page. Yet I'm always pulling less than 100mbps down.
     
  6. Spectrum Abuser macrumors 65816

    Spectrum Abuser

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    #6
    Those numbers sound about right. iPhone 5S/5C/5 top out at about 90Mbps.
     
  7. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    #7
    Real-world numbers over wifi are always WAY WAY less than the listed numbers. Check out the site Small Net Builder for the review of your router where you will find the speeds you should actually expect - even then, only under ideal conditions, close to the source, with no interference. If you want full speed, use Ethernet.
     

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