Using Alu MacBook as local developent

Discussion in 'Web Design and Development' started by ayeying, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Yay Area, CA
    #1
    Hey, I need some input. I'm running a local development server, using MAMP and Coldfusion 8. It runs great on my MacBook pro except for Coldfusion being a memory hog. I was wondering how this would fare out on the new Aluminum MacBooks?

    I don't plan on upgrading to 4GB soon, so I'm not sure if that'll cause an issue with it being slow.
     
  2. SrWebDeveloper macrumors 68000

    SrWebDeveloper

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA, USA
    #2
    For developers not familiar with CF, it's an application server with coding syntax and scripting language similar to ASP but has a Java core. It also has its own scripting language called cfscript plus action scripting/flash integration. It was originally owned by Allaire, then Macromedia who is now Adobe.

    Anyway, as it's another server daemon running on the Mac, CF is a nasty, hungry process (thread) hog -- on Mac or Linux (which is Mac, but trust me, I administered Apache/CF/PHP for five years on old reliable Red Hat and it performed no better). Even when carefully tweaked for cache setup, etc.

    4GB on any modern Intel processor duo core Mac is strongly suggested if you introduce CF into the mix and want it and the other daemons to all run smoothly as you develop and use the database too. The Aluminum MacBook comes with 2GB and can be upgraded to 4GB as per these specs, and there are two processor speeds in current production.

    -jim
     
  3. ayeying thread starter macrumors 601

    ayeying

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Yay Area, CA
    #3
    Thanks for your information.

    I do notice how CF is a huge memory hog. Even on my MBP w/ 6GB, it took close to 1GB of physical memory. I have got the MacBook, tried it, and while it is a memory hog, I can handle it if I don't open up any virtual machines.
     

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