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jwolf6589

macrumors 601
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
4,860
1,609
Colorado
I realized I only have 1000 photos and videos combined on my iOS devices that sync to Mac and appletv for viewing. While I love my Powershot for photos and Vixia for video perhaps I may start using iPhone 13 more for photography to get more memories. While I hate the battery life and how it views in direct sunlight which pales compared to Powershot it’s more convenient. Anyone else doing this? Yes I know that 99% of people I see in public places use their phones for photography. I wonder if anyone in this group is starting to do this more and not use as much their standalone cameras? I will still use Canon but my upcoming trip to Alaska in September I probably won’t.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors Core
No. Can't speak for anyone else, but for me photography is more about tools other than an iPhone. I think I can count on one hand the number of times I've shot a photo with an iPad. That said, I will occasionally use my iPhone 12 Pro for a quick snapshot or two when out somewhere and I see something interesting, and at home I'll grab it and use it when I have an idea for a photo but want to get at least an approximate idea of whether or not that idea will work before getting out the "serious" gear. I'll pick up the iPhone and experiment with it first, decide if the idea is even feasible and if it's not, so much for that. There actually have been a few times when I've actually liked the results I've gotten with the iPhone (either the 12 Pro or its predecessors in years past) that I haven't bothered getting out the "serious" gear because I'm happy with what I shot on the iPhone. That has been pretty rare, though.

Most of the time, though, I prefer using my "serious" gear because it will actually have the focal length or the open-wide aperture or some of the other specific qualities needed in many of the situations in which I shoot. For one thing, I have far more control over the camera and the lens when I am shooting with one of my Sony bodies and an appropriate lens chosen to capture the scene. Today would be a good example of that. I took a stroll on our boardwalk and had my Sony A1 with the 100-400mm lens (with 1.4x teleconverter also mounted). When I got near the foot of the lake I spotted my buddy Alfred, the Great Blue Heron, who was standing in the (relatively shallow) lake doing his thing.....

No way that I would have been able to have captured images of Alfred as close-up as I was able to do and also to control the amount of light on the subject as well as coming into the camera (the sun was very bright just then. I spent some time with Alfred -- not always shooting, sometimes just watching him. If I'd had my iPhone 12 Pro with me, no way I would even have bothered to try shooting Alfred, as he was too far away from me to get any sort of decent shots without a reasonably good zoom range and even if I'd tried, there is a huge difference between the results one gets on a device with a very small sensor (I think the iPhone's sensor is around 1/2 inch?) and a camera with a full-frame large sensor (35mm).

Mind you, that is not to say that absolutely every shot that I did today with my gear is going to be 100% stellar -- using a dedicated camera and lens to capture an image of something is still no guarantee of success. I haven't yet gotten around to reviewing the results of today's time spent with Alfred, but I'm sure there will be a few shots that get hurriedly skipped by when reviewing the files. That's par for the course.....

In the end, whatever is most convenient and makes someone comfortable when they're out-and-about is what counts in the long run. As they say, the camera one has with one is better than no camera at all, and in many situations that is indeed quite accurate.

So if you want to use your iPhone more for capturing scenes and subjects which interest you, go for it.
 
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Lee_Bo

Cancelled
Mar 26, 2017
606
877
I use my iPhone a lot for nature/landscape photography:
cc5f382265d9542a3952fa05339c7cc7.jpg


bf461bf3cce2c2fe3df351d3a79ed8ec.jpg


But my Canon has a 900mm lens that I use for wildlife/action shots:
079b15f65e77796f62bfba8e81b2a420.jpg


d7bf64a25cbfaa95109fb64f292b5e55.jpg
 

r.harris1

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2012
2,202
12,660
Denver, Colorado, USA
There are definitely both professionals and photography enthusiasts moving to their iPhones for at least some of what they do. It's convenient, and if they know their tool well, the images can be really high quality. And even if they don't know their tool well, they can often generate a pleasing image with computational photography that allows for such things as a computationally derived shallow depth of field.

Personally, while I do create iPhone images I like, I prefer to not receive phone calls and texts on my camera :). I prefer the quality of the glass, the ability to control depth of field via glass optics, the reach I can get (wide or long) with the lenses I use and a whole host of other things I find fun about photography that I can only get on the dedicated cameras I choose to use.
 

Apple fanboy

macrumors Ivy Bridge
Feb 21, 2012
55,877
54,182
Behind the Lens, UK
I realized I only have 1000 photos and videos combined on my iOS devices that sync to Mac and appletv for viewing. While I love my Powershot for photos and Vixia for video perhaps I may start using iPhone 13 more for photography to get more memories. While I hate the battery life and how it views in direct sunlight which pales compared to Powershot it’s more convenient. Anyone else doing this? Yes I know that 99% of people I see in public places use their phones for photography. I wonder if anyone in this group is starting to do this more and not use as much their standalone cameras? I will still use Canon but my upcoming trip to Alaska in September I probably won’t.
Not really. I don’t enjoy photography with an iPhone. It just isn’t the same. I’m not looking to capture memories. Just photos. The best camera you have is the one you DON’T leave at home. If I’m going out to take photos, I’ll take the best tool for the job. An iPhone is a Swiss Army knife. Ok in a pinch, but you’d rather have a proper screwdriver for example.
 

cupcakes2000

macrumors 68040
Apr 13, 2010
3,904
5,354
I’m a professional photographer, it’s my sole income. I freelance and have a studio. I use my ‘proper’ gear to shoot my profession shoots, obviously. I sometimes use a nice body and lens for personal stuff if we’re doing something cool.

Aside that, it’s my iPhone 13 Pro all the way. It’s part of the reason I got it. It takes perfect good ‘normal’ photos, and with some care can be a stand in for any camera, as illustrated buy the very cool iPhone shots a few posts above. I sometimes also use it to document myself as I’m shooting shots to post on social feeds to advertise myself.

My phone is always on me. That’s the key and that’s what is almost never case with any other camera.

I find these ‘proper’ camera v’s point and shoot camera v’s smartphone camera conversations a little bit snobby most of the time. At the end of the day, a camera is a camera, and if you have the correct skills behind one, it really doesn’t matter which one you use. Granted, this doesn’t apply to special purpose shooting where special equipment may be necessary, or in various situations where a long lens, for example, is the only way to get the shot - but that’s by the by really.
 
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r.harris1

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2012
2,202
12,660
Denver, Colorado, USA
I’m a professional photographer, it’s my sole income. I freelance and have a studio. I use my ‘proper’ gear to shoot my profession shoots, obviously. I sometimes use a nice body and lens for personal stuff if we’re doing something cool.

Aside that, it’s my iPhone 13 Pro all the way. It’s part of the reason I got it. It takes perfect good ‘normal’ photos, and with some care can be a stand in for any camera, as illustrated buy the very cool iPhone shots a few posts above. I sometimes also use it to document myself as I’m shooting shots to post on social feeds to advertise myself.

My phone is always on me. That’s the key and that’s what is almost never case with any other camera.

I find these ‘proper’ camera v’s point and shoot camera v’s smartphone camera conversations a little bit snobby most of the time. At the end of the day, a camera is a camera, and if you have the correct skills behind one, it really doesn’t matter which one you use. Granted, this doesn’t apply to special purpose shooting where special equipment may be necessary, or in various situations where a long lens, for example, is the only way to get the shot - but that’s by the by really.
I agree that these days, it's hard to go wrong with any camera. Phone-based cameras can produce great images and I see them all the time. As you say, it's the person making the image that matters. Speaking personally (can't speak for everyone :)), I'm not trying to be a snob when I say I prefer a dedicated camera over a phone. I'm saying that given the array of competent tools available and for how I like to produce images, a dedicated camera fits the bill for me. I'm a professional software developer. Being competent, I can develop software on any platform (Linux, Windows, MacOS, mainframes, etc) but I choose MacOS because of both technical and aesthetic things, both of which for me are important. Those things combine to enhance how I work.

It's not that different for my cameras. I can generate a competent image on any camera because I know enough about the fundamentals. I simply prefer to generate them on a dedicated camera (small or large). :)
 

cthompson94

macrumors 6502a
Jan 10, 2022
810
1,164
SoCal
Since I am just a hobbyist, I love using my iPhone 13 PM for really just snapshots and video. I have a very young child and she moves too quickly and sometimes it is just me with her so the iPhone is great with quick recordings of moments whether that be photo or video. I do usually try to bring my Sony A7III with usually the Tamron 24-70 to take higher quality photos, I do not want to say necessarily better, because I have seen some truly amazing photos from others with their iPhone. The biggest thing is time which determines which I would use, with the Mirrorless and aperture priority (along with personal ISO limits set) I can easily take good quality photos of my little one because you cannot (currently) beat lens glass and the sensors in DSLR/Mirrorless I don't care how many pixels and pixel binning they put in phones currently. If I am somewhere more crowded with the little one then I will just stick with the iPhone because it is easier.

My usual setup is Sony for photos, I usually take at least one photo with the iPhone to record the location (I like adding location in my photos in editing) and I use the iPhone mainly for videos if I have the Sony with me, while the video quality would be much better on the Sony especially with variable NDs and everything else, the moments I typically need recorded are short and quick, so it is easier to leave the iPhone in video mode and Sony in photo mode and I have found this works great for me, but again it is because of time. If I am just going out myself I adjust my gear as desired.

The majority use their photos because it is easy, it is on them already, and it isn't something they need to remember to bring and charge and have enough memory on SD cards/CF Express. The vast majority are also okay with how the photos looks straight out of their phone camera and if not they rather just do quick edits that are either built into the social media platform or a quick easy to use app and post online. When I airdrop photos that I finished editing from my camera into my phone and I show or send those photos to someone they can tell the quality is different.
 
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cupcakes2000

macrumors 68040
Apr 13, 2010
3,904
5,354
I agree that these days, it's hard to go wrong with any camera. Phone-based cameras can produce great images and I see them all the time. As you say, it's the person making the image that matters. Speaking personally (can't speak for everyone :)), I'm not trying to be a snob when I say I prefer a dedicated camera over a phone. I'm saying that given the array of competent tools available and for how I like to produce images, a dedicated camera fits the bill for me. I'm a professional software developer. Being competent, I can develop software on any platform (Linux, Windows, MacOS, mainframes, etc) but I choose MacOS because of both technical and aesthetic things, both of which for me are important. Those things combine to enhance how I work.

It's not that different for my cameras. I can generate a competent image on any camera because I know enough about the fundamentals. I simply prefer to generate them on a dedicated camera (small or large). :)
Ah, apologies! I wasn’t really referring to anyone in this thread, nor the op. Just the concept in general. Obviously real gear will produce infinitely better results in the right hands, that’s why I don’t shoot catalogue sessions with my phone. But - as you say, phone cameras these days are incredible to be honest, certainly good enough!
 

Jumpthesnark

macrumors 65816
Apr 24, 2022
1,111
4,764
California
I realized I only have 1000 photos and videos combined on my iOS devices that sync to Mac and appletv for viewing. While I love my Powershot for photos and Vixia for video perhaps I may start using iPhone 13 more for photography to get more memories. While I hate the battery life and how it views in direct sunlight which pales compared to Powershot it’s more convenient. Anyone else doing this? Yes I know that 99% of people I see in public places use their phones for photography. I wonder if anyone in this group is starting to do this more and not use as much their standalone cameras? I will still use Canon but my upcoming trip to Alaska in September I probably won’t.

1) A camera - whether it's the one in your phone or a "real" camera - is just a tool for creation. Use the right one for the job.

2) To me, a phone camera is not a substitute for a real camera. Great to have around in a pinch, and convenient for sharing some photos, but it's not a real camera to me. I always have some gear with me, whether it's several bodies and lenses, or just a Fujifilm X100S. In addition to the better lenses, sensors and controls that real cameras offer (as mentioned in basically all of the previous replies), I don't see photos with an iPhone. I see photos with a camera.

3) It doesn't matter what other people are using to take photos with. You use what works for you, regardless of what you see when shooting out in public, or what we say here.
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 601
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
4,860
1,609
Colorado
1) A camera - whether it's the one in your phone or a "real" camera - is just a tool for creation. Use the right one for the job.

2) To me, a phone camera is not a substitute for a real camera. Great to have around in a pinch, and convenient for sharing some photos, but it's not a real camera to me. I always have some gear with me, whether it's several bodies and lenses, or just a Fujifilm X100S. In addition to the better lenses, sensors and controls that real cameras offer (as mentioned in basically all of the previous replies), I don't see photos with an iPhone. I see photos with a camera.

3) It doesn't matter what other people are using to take photos with. You use what works for you, regardless of what you see when shooting out in public, or what we say here.
I can cave into peer pressure. But you are right Powershot is the better choice.
 
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r.harris1

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2012
2,202
12,660
Denver, Colorado, USA
Ah, apologies! I wasn’t really referring to anyone in this thread, nor the op. Just the concept in general. Obviously real gear will produce infinitely better results in the right hands, that’s why I don’t shoot catalogue sessions with my phone. But - as you say, phone cameras these days are incredible to be honest, certainly good enough!
Ha! And writing words is such a challenge - I wasn't intending to suggest you were referring to anyone but really just offering a different perspective. I agree that digressing into "this or that is better" discussions is ... tedious :). We all do what we do for our various and sundry reasons. Know what you want and why, then do it! It's a great time to be interested in photography.
 
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VampyricGentleman

macrumors 6502
May 28, 2022
348
2,927
South Wales, UK
I’m just a hobby photographer, my photography is just for fun and I follow the dictum my photography teacher gave me when I learnt the basics “The best camera you can have is the one in your hand at the right moment”. My most recent photo of the day on the forum here for example was taken on my iPhone because 1) I was out being social until the early hours of the morning 2) I wouldn’t carry expensive and visible gear at that time of night in places I don’t know all that well
 
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MacNut

macrumors Core
Jan 4, 2002
22,995
9,975
CT
The iPhone sucks in direct light, way to much lens flair. For backlit stuff it's fine.
 

mollyc

macrumors 604
Aug 18, 2016
7,937
49,069
Nobody should ever use the camera on an iPad for anything decent. Maybe scanning a document. Otherwise use the best camera you own and carry whenever you need it.
 

AlaskaMoose

macrumors 68040
Apr 26, 2008
3,530
13,389
Alaska
Photography is not about the camera you use, but about what you can do with it. Just look at the most famous photographs around the world that were taken many years ago, some with pinhole cameras. Painting is somewhat similar in that the painter uses his or her skills, regardless if using a cheap brush, or a very expensive one.

This is one of numerous pinhole camera photographers:

These are photos taken with tablets of various kinds:

By the way, if you want to see something interesting, hand any of your old cameras, cellphone, tablet, etc., to one of your kids (the one who is the most interested in "taking pictures"), and let the kid (he or her) take photos with it. Just don't tell the what photos to take; jus let him (her) go at it using his or her imagination. Sooner or later the kid will develop his or her own skills and will amaze you with some great "pictures."
 
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jwolf6589

macrumors 601
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
4,860
1,609
Colorado
Photography is not about the camera you use, but about what you can do with it. Just look at the most famous photographs around the world that were taken many years ago.
Okay so no need for a SLR? No need for a mirror less camera? Why bother with those expensive cameras because I sure can’t afford one with my small income. Powershot cost me $500 and is a great camera!
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 601
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
4,860
1,609
Colorado
Nobody should ever use the camera on an iPad for anything decent. Maybe scanning a document. Otherwise use the best camera you own and carry whenever you need it.
Yes but sometimes I don’t have Powershot with me so I will use iPhone or iPad. Oh and the mini 6 has a much improved camera over the Mini 5. Big time! It’s even got a flash!
 

bunnspecial

macrumors G3
May 3, 2014
8,335
6,446
Kentucky
By the way, if you want to see something interesting, hand any of your old cameras, cellphone, tablet, etc., to one of your kids (the one who is the most interested in "taking pictures"), and let the kid (he or her) take photos with it. Just don't tell the what photos to take; jus let him (her) go at it using his or her imagination. Sooner or later the kid will develop his or her own skills and will amaze you with some great "pictures."

Funny that you say this-

I have a niece who is 6 years old.

Just spent this past weekend with my sister, BIL, and their kids and when my niece wasn't trying to paint nails or do makeup, she was walking around with a P&S. It's one of my sister's old ones-a small Coolpix of some sort or another. I don't know exactly how old it is-it was probably my sister's last before she bought her D3200? that she never uses anymore.

It was interesting to see some of her work, completely free of any influence other than just what happened to catch her eye. If she sticks with it, I'll be interested to see what she makes of it. She wanted to try my camera(D810+24-70 f/2.8) but couldn't quite hold it.
 
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mollyc

macrumors 604
Aug 18, 2016
7,937
49,069
Yes but sometimes I don’t have Powershot with me so I will use iPhone or iPad. Oh and the mini 6 has a much improved camera over the Mini 5. Big time! It’s even got a flash!
fine. then use the phone. never the ipad. it’s obnoxious to hold up.
 
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