Using keygen to generate key

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by alphaod, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    Feb 9, 2008
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    NYC
    #1
    Let's have this hypothetical situation:

    A consumer, had purchased a piece of software (legally of course), say Adobe Photoshop CS3, but for some reason, he/she lost his/her license key and he/she just bought CS4 as an upgrade; Adobe can't help because it's after hours and he/she needs to install CS4 because it is needed right now.

    Since you are installing an upgrade, the software will ask for your previous license key to verify this. Knowing that the consumer has already legally purchased CS3 and an upgrade to CS4, he/she uses a keygen to generate a license to CS3 and installs the software.

    Would you think this is legal and should be okay to do?

    Note: Please keep the "what happens if a pirate does this" issues out.
     
  2. Carrot007 macrumors regular

    Carrot007

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    Sep 18, 2006
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    #2
    I would think that.

    a. it is not legal since you are not using "your key"

    b. would probably fail if the key is checked online unless you happen to chance on one of the keys actually in use (unlikely)
     
  3. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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  4. alphaod thread starter macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    Feb 9, 2008
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    #4
    The "assumption" is that this works ;)
     
  5. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #5
    Have to agree. You also might run into issue when Adobe discovers it and deactivates your copy. Might not be worth the headache.
     
  6. RemarkabLee macrumors 6502a

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    Nov 14, 2007
    #6
    Your IP address have been logged and the Feds are on their way :)
     
  7. justflie macrumors 6502a

    justflie

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    Red Sox Nation
    #7
    I'd do it. Sure, it's not within the letter of the law, but it's not being done maliciously. Said hypothetical person bought the original software. It just helps point to the glaring DRM issue. So, in this case, nuts to the law and sweaty nuts to DRM!!! :)
     
  8. SHIFTLife macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    #8
    Technically, it isn't illegal to use another key, provided you do in fact have a legally licensed version and can PROVE that. Whether that's by having them help you recover the key during business hours or showing proof of purchase of the license doesn't really matter.

    If you read the licensing agreement, you've purchased a license for the SOFTWARE, not the registration code. The registration code is merely a device to help stem the use of pirated software, it is not the license itself. I'm sure Adobe would tell you otherwise, but any lawyer who has actually read the full license agreement would tell you there's no problem with it.

    All that said, why bother with the headache? Legal or not, if Adobe finds out, they're sure to make your life hell.
     
  9. BobZune macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2007
    Location:
    USA
    #9
    Will someone quote me the law (statutory law passed by Congress - assuming US here - or regulation by a Regulatory authority) that says you have to use your license number and only your license number with the software you purchased, or you are in violation of a law/regulation?

    Sure it may be a technical violation of a license agreement, but remember you are presumed innocent until proven guilty (and since you purchased the software, where are they going to find a jury that will find you guilty) -- and what would the public response be from future customers, for a company that sued a past customer like that? Consider also that you didn't really negotiate or formally SIGN a license agreement - the click-through license agreements, which are imposed generally with all benefits to one party and all drawbacks to the other party are tenuous in court at best.

    [I am not a lawyer.]
     
  10. SnowLeopard2008 macrumors 604

    SnowLeopard2008

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    Jul 4, 2008
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    Silicon Valley
    #10
    Like some others have said, it's legally not allowed but morally so.
     
  11. madog macrumors 65816

    madog

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    Korova Milkbar
    #11
    I am not a lawyer, but I just wan't to say it's perfectly legal, and if/when Adobe finds out they have cookies and flowers delivered to your house!

    It's true! My friend's girlfriend's buddy that her sister met on the internet saw it on the news once.

    :D
     
  12. BobZune macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2007
    Location:
    USA
    #12
    Whether it is legal or illegal depends on what a court may decide at some future date on a similar case (and appeals decisions etc). There is no law against using software which you purchased (even with a "wrong" license number), irrespective of what the so called end user license agreement may say. [And behavior not explicitly prohibited by law is allowed and is thereby "legal" by not being "illegal."]

    It is better to know your rights and stand up for them, rather than have they slowly taken away, and look for permission from 'the man' to do anything.
     
  13. cmcbridejr macrumors 6502a

    cmcbridejr

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    Sep 28, 2007
    Location:
    Alpharetta, GA
    #13
    I know that I have called technical support with other companies when having issues with my key and they would have me use another one.

    I am guessing that the technical support employees have "key generators" that they use everyday. So, I do not see a problem if you payed for it already. However, you may not get the support.

    Paradox all the way!
     

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