Utilizing Cat5e and OnQ

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by heavyload, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. heavyload macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2013
    #1
    Hello,
    I recently moved into a new house and am having problems with WiFi, as there are many signals all around me. What I am trying to do is download OnDemand videos from DirecTV, as well as use Pandora, using equipment located downstairs (the cable modem and wireless router are currently upstairs, which further degrades the signal).

    The house came wired with Cat5e, so I got to thinking I could just plug everything into the Ethernet jacks. I have a Netgear High Speed Cable Modem - DOCSIS 3.0 (CMD31T) connected to Time Warner in one room upstairs where my computer is. I think what I need to do is attach it further up the line, within the OnQ system that also came with the house. Looking at the telecom module in the box, I see that it is a 1x11 standard model. Do I need an Ethernet switch, and if so, where do I plug it in so that I don’t mess up the land line connection I will be getting? What I need to do is send internet to all Ethernet jacks except for the one in the kitchen, where the phone will be plugged in.

    Thank you in advance

    ----------

    I should mention that the incoming Cat5e terminates in 110 punch-down connectors, rather than RJ45 connectors, which would seem plug neatly into an ethernet jack on a router or modem.
     
  2. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    Feb 19, 2008
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    The Finger Lakes Region
    #2
  3. heavyload thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2013
    #3
    I understand I need a better wireless system, but I'd really like to figure out the Ethernet thing if I could.
     
  4. eschw95458, Oct 2, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013

    eschw95458 macrumors member

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    Oct 30, 2007
    #4
    You are going to need a few things. For starters a good router. ( I use netgear ) and probably a switch. (or 2). How many jacks in the house are you supplying with ethernet?
    Your router does a few things, it will supply nat address translation, and you can also use it to supply DHCP (an address ) to each device on your network, and most routers these days have a built in firewall. (always a good thing)
    And, this is just my suggestion, since your modem looks like it is already gigabit, I would stay with that on your other gear. (modem, switch).
    Here is an example of a router ( I don't know how good this one is but the specs look good ) goto amazon and search for WNDR3700
    and then for a switch maybe a gs108 or gs116 ( I personally have both and like them because they are fanless )

    WHEW..... and as the the jack in the kitchen, you can have your phone and an ethernet connection both there but to do it you will be limited to 10/100 on the ethernet. (I have mine setup this way )
     
  5. heavyload thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Oct 1, 2013
    #5
    Thanks for all the great info.

    I am going to be supplying Ethernet to 3 or 4 jacks throughout the house. I'm assuming that my configuration will look something like this inside my OnQ box:

    Incoming cable coax => cable modem => router => switch => OnQ panel

    From there, the OnQ will distribute the Ethernet signal throughout the house (primarily to my computer at one RJ45 jack and my DireTV Genie through the other RJ45 jack), or at least that's what I'm assuming.

    What I'm having a problem with is how to make the switch => OnQ connection. The connectors for the lines coming into the OnQ panel are 110 punch-downs, not RJ45s, so it is not simply a matter of of pulling them out of the OnQ panel and plugging them into the switch. On the OnQ panel, I do see a pair of RJ45 jacks connected with a short jumper. Would I plug my switch into one of these, and then have the signal pass into the OnQ panel and be distributed to the outgoing Cat5e?
     
  6. eschw95458 macrumors member

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    Oct 30, 2007
    #6
    Ok, we have to determine first a couple of things. Is the module in the OnQ panel for ethernet or telephone? ( I am guessing tele) If you can take a picture I sent you my email in a private message. (well I tried to but your account must be set for not allowing PM's)
    This looks correct
    Incoming cable coax => cable modem => router => switch => OnQ panel

    Good news if you are only servicing 3 or 4 jacks you can eliminate the switch and come directly off of the router, (that router that I showed you already has 4 jacks) You will only need a switch if you A) need more connections than 4 (depending on the router) or if at one of your endpoint connections has multiple devices, Say you have a smart tv and some other internet capable box at the same location.
    Are there any unused cables coming into the OnQ panel?
     
  7. heavyload thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Oct 1, 2013
    #7
    I cannot tell if it dedicated for phone or otherwise. Maybe the attached pics will help. Don't see any unused cables coming into the box. My DirecTV is routed through the box, too, so, as you can imagine, it's pretty crowded in there. Had to remove the numerous coax cables and SWM device just to get a good picture. :)
     

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  8. eschw95458, Oct 4, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013

    eschw95458 macrumors member

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    Oct 30, 2007
    #8
    Ok, definitely a telecom module. I hate when installers are CHEAP. They could have (and should have ) pulled 2 wires to each location. Anyway
    All is not lost however, here is what you need to ask first
    1) I just want to confirm that those cables are marked cat5e
    2) It looks like you have 7 phone jacks (probably one in each bedroom, kitchen, living room. Do you need all these locations for phones? (my phone is wireless so I just use one base station with 2 extra handsets )
    3) Are these jacks located close enough for your needs.
    4) Does your internet connection ( coax cable?? ) come into this box?

    So if you are (y, n, y, y) then you just need to get a few items
    1)Router, 2) Search amazon for " Leviton 47605-C5B Category 5 Voice and Data Module 6-Port, Bracket " this may fit your cabinet. 3) when you search amazon for the previous item you will see below in the other items cat 5e quick port connector, didn't look like the best price there (they are expensive any where you get them, I either order them online or if I just need a few you can pick them up at home depot or lowes 4) Face plates for these quick port connectors. (also HD or Lowes ) 5) (looks like this is included with data module but if you use somethings else ) cheap 110 punchdown tool (less than $3)

    You can also do this other ways but I was guessing you don't own a rj-45 crimper so the data port makes life a little easier. Also one more note while I was looking at amazon in the feedback section for that data module someone mentioned that it uses a cat5 "A" configuration make sure when you wire the wall sockets that you also use the "A" configuration (its marked on the side of the quick ports)
     
  9. heavyload thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2013
    #9
    Wow, you are a font of knowledge. Much appreciated. Here are my answers. I'll let you know how it turns out after I get my supplies and get started.

    1) Yes, cables and face plates in each room are marked Cat5e
    2) No, I only need one that goes to the kitchen where my wireless base will be stored.
    3) Yes, the jack that I need most for Ethernet comes out of the same face plate that the coax comes out of. That is why I'm a little surprised that it the setup is not Ethernet-ready.
    4) My coax from Time Warner does come into this box. The main line is then split off to all the other rooms. What the DirecTV guy did was bring the satellite line into this box and then use the splitter to send satellite to each of the rooms, most of which I won't be using. There is a direct connection between the TW incoming line and the room where the cable modem is housed. I will simply move the cable modem inside the OnQ box so that I can convert the internet signal from coax to Ethernet, whereby it will be distributed to the room my computer is in and the room where the main television/DirecTV are located.
     
  10. eschw95458, Oct 7, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013

    eschw95458 macrumors member

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    Oct 30, 2007
    #10
    1) Yes, cables and face plates in each room are marked Cat5e


    Here is a link to the Manual
    http://www.legrand.us/~/media/Images/Support/On-Q/Technical-Documents/IS-000-IS-200/IS-0011.ashx
    Ok, had to do some more research, this OnQ terminology is different. The WAN port was throwing me off. So from what I can glean on the internet is that this system gets setup as a phone system and then with the WAN (wide area network) you can use one outlet as a data port. Apparently the faceplates are rj45 they are probably wired straight through so maybe you want to remove one of the faceplates and take a picture and post it here. I suspect you will just want to change them and get the data module. As for the "phone jack" in the kitchen that is probably an rj45 as well I would definitely mark that (and any others you keep as phones) with a PHONE label or change them to rj11 jacks.
    Also in your current setup I don't believe that red jumper cable is doing anything, You should try removing it and make sure everything is still working.
     
  11. eschw95458, Oct 7, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013

    eschw95458 macrumors member

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    Oct 30, 2007
    #11
    .. and just one more thing (for you and anybody else reading this)

    These faceplates and jacks in the rooms that you are going to convert if they are already rj45 jacks even if they are wired straight through you could make them work. (Saving you from having to buy new ones)
    Since we know the data module I gave you the link to is an "A" configuration you just have to figure out how to make the sockets match. If there are no markings inside to tell you which wire goes where in the socket( I have ran into this before) Even if they are marked you should still make sure the order is correct.
    Use an electrical tester and looking at the socket ( the side the cable goes in ) with the spot the clip on the cable goes into pointing down, just wire it from left to right. Touch your continuity tester to pin 1 ( most left pin ) and then find on the back of the socket which one that is and place the Green-White wire there then #2 Green #3 Orange-White #4 Blue #5 Blue-White #6 Orange #7 Brown-White #8 Brown. :D
     

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