UV Filter Needed?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by harleymhs, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. harleymhs macrumors 6502

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    #1
    Hey Guys, I want to get the new Hoya HD2 filter for my D610, I currently have a UV filter on it and I do see some differences when I have it on and when I dont have it on.. Some people say with DSLR's you dont need it as much as a film SLR.. So my question is should I order the HD2 Protector Filter which is multi coated or the UV version of the HD2 filter? Thanks!!!
     
  2. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

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    #2
    Well I would, because whatever the benefits in IQ, it will also act as a protector for the front of your lens. Much easier to replace a filter than get a scratch off your front lens glass element.
    Also I use the Hoya brand and would recommend them.
    No good for my 14-24mm or 10.5mm fish eye. I just have to be super careful with those.
     
  3. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3
    I WANT the filter, and USE one NOW, my question was with UV or JUST the HD2 Protector version.. thanks!
     
  4. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

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    #4
    I say UV from what I have read. Thats what I use.
     
  5. MCH-1138 macrumors 6502

    MCH-1138

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    #5
    My understanding is that the digital sensor doesn't really benefit from a UV filter in the way that a film camera might (as you note in your original post). So it seems that a neutral clear/protector filter is all you need.

    But if you think you can see the difference with a UV filter, there is probably no harm (beyond that inherent in using any filter) in using that one (assuming multicoating, etc. is the same between the two).
     
  6. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    #6
    Digital cameras/lenses in general don't need UV filters. However, as some remain advocates for filters as lens protection, it pays to get the best glass you can afford that has minimal optical qualities that degrade your image taking capabilities.

    Hoya makes 'okay' UV type filters but you might want to invest in something more like B+W filters (particularly their middle to higher end line).

    There are of course other makers that also make excellent filters and B+W is the first that came to mind.

    Just be aware that certain lenses, though they can take a filter on the front, can be degraded rather easily with the added filter with respect to creating light diffraction/flair/obstruction of edges of frame etc. As for me, I use filters on some lenses as protection and a "sock" style lens cover rather than lens caps that may fall off (sometimes this is more common with added filters).
     
  7. JDDavis macrumors 65816

    JDDavis

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    #7
    Personal choice I guess. I can tell you my experience. I stopped using them years ago and on some lenses I can tell a difference...as in I like the results better without a filter (I still use a ND filter sometimes). I can say that I'm pretty rough on my gear and expose lenses to lots of scratchable situations. In all the years I've only scratched one lens and it had no effect on images. I've cracked the housing of a lens, a body, and cracked an LCD cover but that's it.

    It should also be noted that I don't have a kit full of $2k+ lenses
     
  8. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Just bought the Hoya HD2 I didn't get the uv I got the protector version! In my past I used my d610 with no filter and noticed a small difference when I used a uv filter! So I don't want yo go naked just bought a tamron lens for 1000 don't want to take a chance! Thanks for all your replies
     
  9. AlaskaMoose macrumors 65816

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  10. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #10
    A good UV filter does nothing positive for a digital sensor. A bad filter (any type) can wreck the recorded image.

    In general you only need a good polarizer and a good ND (or VND). The rest of the filters make expensive drink coasters.
     
  11. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Thants what I thought! THANK YOU!
     
  12. Edge100 macrumors 68000

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    #12
    Anything that can break your UV filter can (and will) also break your front element.

    The best protect for your lens (with respect to impact damage) is a hood.
     
  13. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #13
    Amen! Also a filter does zero to address flare....and a hood does.
     
  14. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

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    #14
    UV and plain glass are one and the same to digital cameras.
    Personally I don't use either of them as they damage image quality and the front element is extremely durable to begin with.
     
  15. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

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    #15
    Can't we use both? I do.
     
  16. Edge100 macrumors 68000

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    #16
    Indeed, a filter may *cause* more flare.

    ----------

    Sure. There's no need to, but you can.
     
  17. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    #17
    Of course this is true. The filter is clear and does not change the image.

    But people like it because t keeps the front of the lens clean. The only problem is that a really good filter costs maybe $35. The poor quality filters degrade the image. So is it worth $35 to have a clear lens cap?
     
  18. tgara macrumors 6502a

    tgara

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    #18
    Well, the UV or protector filters are often useful in wet or dusty environments. I know some lenses, like the Canon 17-40 f/4 are not sealed unless you use a filter on the front.

    As a general rule, I don't use UV or protector filters either, except in wet or dusty environments. On the other hand, I'll use a polarizer or VND filter a lot, especially with landscapes.
     
  19. MCAsan macrumors 601

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    #19
    Agreed. There are times and places, such as Upper Antelope Canyon, that you want a weather proof camera body and lens. For most folks such times and places are the rare exception.

    That is one thing I love about my weather sealed Olympus E-M1 and their Pro lenses. You can use them standing in a shower of rain. You just want to use a hood to keep water off the front lens element.
     
  20. leighonigar macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    I use Hoya HMC UV(c) filters on my lenses and I've never noticed the difference (which is why I choose those). I don't buy the protector filters as they tend to cost a few pounds more and the HMC ones seem good enough. I tend to agree that extra UV filtering is not required on digital cameras.
     
  21. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #21
    I see you are correct, I wonder why the protector filters are a bit more than UV ones.. Figured it would be the other way around.. Cost more to put an extra UV coating on it.. ?
     
  22. leighonigar macrumors 6502a

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    #22
    I've not investigated. Hoya do make a better series than the 'HMC' UV ones, the Pro 1 IIRC, so I'm sure the protectors could be more nicely made. I suspect however that when the digital era came in they were keen to sell a load more (and more expensive) filters to digital converts, hence the 'protector' filters, which I do not recall being so widely available before. A few years down the line they perhaps remain a way of Hoya making a few more pounds/dollars from the willing while not losing the cheaper end of the market (me) who still buys their cheaper UV line.
     
  23. tgara macrumors 6502a

    tgara

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    #23
    Funny you mention upper Antelope Canyon. I was there a couple years ago taking shots in the slot canyons. There was a windstorm above, and lots of sand showered from above. The grit got into my 17-40 lens and I had to send it to Canon for cleaning and repair. I don't think even a filter would have helped!
     
  24. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #24
    Fully understand that. The first time we were in the canyon we had sand pouring in on us. We were shooting with Tamron 18-270 lenses which gave us a wide range of shots. Those lens had to go to Tamron for a rebuild. We ended up trading them in the for the second version of that lens. :D
     
  25. tgara macrumors 6502a

    tgara

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    #25
    Did the Indians take you in on the 4x4s like this?

    [​IMG]
     

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