Very cold macbook pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by tweedierhail, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. tweedierhail macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    #1
    My macbook pro is running at a maximum of 40 degrees. My room is 68 degrees farenheit, and i was wondering if anything is wrong?
     

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  2. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #2
    Your temperature scale is in Celsius. There is nothing wrong apart from your lack of knowledge of the International System(AKA what every country apart from the US uses).:p:D:apple:
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    Click the "i" in the upper left corner of iStat Pro to change your temp display from Celsius to Fahrenheit.
     
  4. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    #4
    More reasons why the US of A should use metric :D
    Mine ran at 30°C during cold nights :O
     
  5. wikus macrumors 68000

    wikus

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Planet earth.
    #5
    Imperial system is so backwards;
    1 inch = 2.54cm
    1 foot = 12 inches
    1 yard = 3 feet
    1 mile = 1760 yards


    Who the hell came up with such a assbackwards system? Here, look how easy and obvious the metric system is;

    1cm = 10mm
    1m = 100cm
    1km = 1000m

    Holy crap! Did you see that?! A monkey just figured it out.
     
  6. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #6
    We use it, just not exclusively.

    The English, mostly.

    1 inch = the width of the king's thumb
    1 foot = the length of his foot
    1 yard = the length of his arm
    1 mile = 1000 paces (this was Roman, not English)

    And a meter is what, exactly? The distance light travels in a vacuum in 1⁄299,792,458 of a second. Real obvious, there. :rolleyes:

    Don't be so hard on yourself.
     
  7. Prodo123 macrumors 68020

    Prodo123

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    #7
    Then let's cut off the King's thumb, foot, arm and leg, then incinerate them!
    Good god I sound cynical
     
  8. tweedierhail thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    #8
    Cold

    I know the difference between celsius and fahrenheit, but on my 2009 macbook pro all the temperatures were like 60 degrees
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Did you change the setting in iStat Pro? The temps you referred to in your original post are Celsius.
     
  10. tweedierhail thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    #10
    Cold

    Yes, im saying that my last macbook ran at 60 degrees celsius and my current one is running at 20 degrees cooler. I said my room was 68 degrees farenheit because i didn't feel like converting it
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    If your CPU is running at 40C, it's not running much at all. If you put any significant load on it, it will quickly climb into the 60s or beyond.
     
  12. SolitaryHowl macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    #12
    Mine usually idles around that temperature too, although it all depends on ambient temperature too.

    When I am playing intensive games or doing 3D rendering, my CPU goes up to 95 C ad then I start freaking out thinking my MBP will shut down any second. It never has.
     
  13. DWBurke811 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2011
    Location:
    Boca Raton, FL
    #13
    I really hope we never change over to metric, like if someone says they're 2.3 meters tall I have no idea what that means, I have to convert it in my head to feet. Same with temperatures and everything. I only use metric for my computer because I know what temperatures are "appropriate," but I have to spend a little time to know "what temperature" it is. And on top of that, imperials just plain better; hence why we use it :cool:
     
  14. Wombert macrumors regular

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    Oct 31, 2005
    Location:
    Munich, Germany
    #14
    If someone says they're 5'9" tall I have no idea what that means either, I have to convert it in my head to centimeters (something I actually can't because measuring in feet and inches instead of just feet is extra retarded).

    The difference between you and me is that I can convert measurements in my system (the metric one) to other related units without using a calculator.

    10 mm = 1 cm
    100 cm = 1 m
    1000 m = 1 km

    A cube with an edge length of 10 cm has a volume of 1 liter; this volume in water will have a mass of 1 kg (or, you guessed it, 1000 g).

    See, easy. You're just not used to it, much like I'm not used to the imperial system.

    Regarding temperatures: water freezes at 0 °C and boils at 100 °C (sea level). That's a lot more logical than using "the lowest temperature in the winter of 1907/1908 in the city of Gdansk" as the point for 0 °F, wouldn't you agree?
     
  15. Jase Winter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    #15
    You say your macbook is running cool like it's a bad thing...... :eek:
     
  16. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #16
    Guess what? That's what the rest of the world thinks about your system. I'm an engineering student up here in the great white north(Canada) where we have to learn both measuring systems because Canada has so many dealings with the US. If it weren't for that, I wouldn't have to put up with this inch, lbs, ft, mile nonsense!

    But heh, to each his own, there are some things I like better in imperial units(such as pressures, power and weight).
     
  17. yusukeaoki macrumors 68030

    yusukeaoki

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    Mar 22, 2011
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    #17
    This is why our country needs to grow up and get with the flow!
    Everyone uses metric system except us!
     
  18. SolitaryHowl macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    #18
    I live in Canada, and I too prefer the metric system. I don't understand my dad, who grew up in Canada before they adopted the metric system, when he speaks in imperial. The measurements just don't make sense.

    Although, I will admit I say my height and weight using the imperial system because that's the way I was brought up.
     
  19. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #19
    I'm an engineer by profession, and I've learned to use both systems as well. Electrically, we're basically 100% metric/SI. Mechanically, not so much. But we do learn both systems.

    They make sense to him, as well as to you - because what makes sense is not the reason for using a system, what makes sense is what you're most comfortable with. The proof is below:

     
  20. GuitarG20 macrumors 65816

    GuitarG20

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2011
    #20
    mine runs at about 37C at idle, or with just chrome/hamachi open...
     
  21. shardey macrumors 6502a

    shardey

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2010
    #21
    With my computer running iTunes, 2 tabs on safari and typing a paper on word, it hovers around 38-42 celcius. These sandy bridge CPU's run so much more efficient in terms of power consumption.
     
  22. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    #22
    I spent some time in the US and there you are forced to deal with this weird system. Metric is a lot easier to get used to because you know one length, weight or volumen measurement you know them all. Imperial you have to learn them all.

    For some stuff imperial has quite usable measurements. Even in Europe screens are usually measured in inch or zoll because cm are to small and m to large. But nobody knows how long a yard is or what an American does when he tries to measure something much smaller than an inch.
    Where imperial gets really unusable is volumes. You just cannot get used to that. At least here they should adopt metric.
    Anyway it is quite annoying because you can get used to a pound very easy but next there is something in oz and you cannot even convert that to pound. You end up converting it to gr and again to pound or kilo just to see how much meat you are buying there actually. It is just annoying when buying food that you cannot really convert one into the other with ease. I actually learned the names of spices and stuff faster than these weird measurements.
    Don't even let me start about cups the single most annoying measurement for any unenlightened, especially when you got recipes that are so far off with too much sugar and stuff that you cannot wrap your head around it. I initially though cups are much much smaller more like a spoonful because I wouldn't believe the recipe true otherwise.
     
  23. negativzero macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    #23
    I got my 2011 MacBook Pro 15" 2.2GHz idling at 39-45 with Safari, Photoshop, iTunes and Adium running in the background. Mind you this is the worst MacBook Pro around this generation when it comes to temperatures. So all of you should be getting cooler books than me.
     
  24. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    Mar 2, 2008
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    Always a day away
    #24
    See, to me the exact opposite is true. It makes no sense to measure every single length with one unit (meter) - how many meters wide is a pencil? Or the distance from home to work, in meters? Yes, you'd probably measure one in mm and one in km - different units. You can SAY it's one unit, but the fact is, people's comfort level is to use different units to measure different things. Using inches for one and miles for the other isn't really any different.

    Depends on what we're measuring. We DO actually use millimeters here, or fractions of an inch.

    You seriously can't convert ounces to pounds? Really?
     
  25. squeakr macrumors 68000

    squeakr

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    #25
    I agree the conversions aren't as direct as moving a decimal point, but once you learn it, it becomes second nature, just like with the metric system. 16 oz = 1 lb. 12 inches = 1 foot 3 feet = 1 yard, hence 36 inches = 1 yard. When measuring smaller than an inch we generally use fractions of an inch (i.e. 1/2 inch or 1/4 inch), which are just smaller portions of an inch (just like cm is a smaller portion of a m). One is not better than the other (just initially easier to convert than the other is). I think the same thing about monetary denominations. I can't easily wrap my head around the whole Pounds, pence etc of other England, so I can see where it could be strange from someone not raised with this system, but I wan't say they are wrong for using their system.
     

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