Very good Temperature new MBPR15

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Reflexiste, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. Reflexiste macrumors member

    Reflexiste

    Joined:
    May 21, 2015
    Location:
    Belgium
    #1
    I have been to occupy with encoder a film in H265 for 40 minutes and I find the temperature very acceptable.
     

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  2. Steve121178 macrumors 68040

    Steve121178

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, UK
    #2
    Still amazed that people worry about temps. Why does it matter? If the notebook gets too hot then it will shut itself down as a safety mechanism to prevent any damage. There is really no need for a user to monitor it.
     
  3. Reflexiste thread starter macrumors member

    Reflexiste

    Joined:
    May 21, 2015
    Location:
    Belgium
    #3
    I do nothing but compare with my MBP 2009 ;)
     
  4. sebseb macrumors 6502

    sebseb

    Joined:
    May 24, 2014
    #4
    Of course the temps are low, fans are running at full speed! I think what concerns people is high temps by just using safari and non intensive apps.
     
  5. JD92 macrumors 6502a

    JD92

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    #5
    Maybe people are worried that the computer will shut itself down as a safety mechanism at an inopportune time. Or maybe they're worried that a CPU running at a within-spec 80C all day will shorten its life, and will die just as AppleCare coverage ends. There's no reason to not want a computer that runs nice and cool.
     
  6. McDLT macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    #6
    Monitoring that stuff makes me paranoid but I am happy to hear it.
     
  7. redshifted macrumors regular

    redshifted

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2014
    Location:
    Midwest
    #7
    I tested this by running Unigine Valley in benchmark mode. This gives me a max temp of 87ºC (on my brand new 15" 2015 2.8GHz MBP) before the fans kick in. It drops into the 60-65ºC range with the fans on full-tilt boogie mode. It doesn't seem to be something to worry about compared to my Radeongate GPU-challenged 2011 17" MBP that I'm replacing :cool:. ​
     
  8. fatlardo macrumors 6502

    fatlardo

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    #8
    Of course, what else is there to do? :p
     
  9. Steve121178 macrumors 68040

    Steve121178

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, UK
    #9
    CPU's are designed to run to a certain level all day, every day. They can run hot without any issue, it's in their design to do so.

    Some people need to focus on their work instead of wasting time monitoring things that don't need to be monitored.
     
  10. Smoothie macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #10
    If you visit any site frequented by people who build their own computers, you always see lots of posts about operating temps and how to reduce them. There's a reason for this. Heat shortens the life of electronic components. Yes, CPUs have upper limits (Tjunction Max) on temps that will produce throttling to prevent destroying the device, but constantly operating a CPU just below that limit will reduce the life of the CPU.

    Additionally, the heat from the CPU and GPU will get transferred to other components in the system, like the SSD. The case of the MBP is crammed with components, so heat transfers between components more easily. You can feel this by placing your hand on the frame of a MBP when the CPU is operating near 100 percent. Desktop builders have the luxury of choosing cases that permit good air flow to keep the components cooler.

    So it's smart to check the temps of a laptop that's used for gaming or any other activity that will place a high load on the CPU, especially when you first buy it. It's possible that thermal paste wasn't applied correctly at the factory or a particular CPU is faulty (very rare, but it can happen).
     

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