Video Stores Explained To Modern Kids

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by thatoneguy82, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. thatoneguy82 macrumors 68000

    thatoneguy82

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Location:
    Beach Cities, CA
    #1
    I stumbled upon this through a friend and it certainly made me feel old. I'm 31 and I still remember going to Blockbuster or Hollywood video to get VHS or DVD movies. Now, it's so much simpler to watch a movie through OnDemand, Netflix, iTunes, etc. I still miss going to some video stores sometime and just peruse the aisles if I'm not sure what I want.

     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #2
    Tempus fugit........and we thought we were cutting edged cool kids at the time, lips curled in a sneer at our parents' incomprehension of the wonders of technology.

    Try explaining a vinyl LP to a modern kid, (indeed, try explaining a CD to a modern kid...)........Actually, here's another: Try explaining the difference between 'mono' and 'stereo' audio output to a modern kid.

    Sigh. I remember standing, with my brother, (young teenagers, both of us) worshipfully reverent, in an electronics store, marvelling at the outsize speakers (black, naturally) with which more modern stereo turntables had begun to be equipped.

    After a coordinated campaign of reasoned logic, pleading, and yearning persuasion on our part, - we were becoming the sort of musically obsessed intellectual teenagers that anyone from that era will readily recognise - our father duly embarked on a serious programme of research of his own, prowling and trawling around the electronics stores, asking questions, demanding answers and comparing specifications. At the time, of course, we took it entirely for granted that he would compare brands and specifications and do the necessary legwork and homework to ensure the purchase of an excellent stereo set. Now, I know it for what it was: An act of love.

    In the end, for Christmas that year (we are talking mid 70s), a wonderful stereo set made its appearance chateau nous. Our respective savings accounts had also been raided (the old 'let's have a [named specified sum] subsidy towards Santa' suggestion), with the unimpeachable argument that a contribution from us would give us a sense of ownership of said stereo, and ensure that we minded it carefully (we did).
     
  3. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #3
    As always, such a lovely post! Thanks for sharing that delightful remembrance.

    And try explaining to younger folks the concept of listening to radio shows (The Lone Ranger, The Shadow, Superman) because there was NO TV!:eek:
     
  4. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    #4
    Wow, how old are you?

    I was talking to one of the young girls in the office about cassette tapes in cars the other day, and she looked at me like I was mad!

    Then today I had three oap's in and one mentioned he didn't have the internet at home. I remarked how odd this was, when he said he didn't have a mobile.
     
  5. sdilley14 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Mesa, AZ
    #5
    Same. Occasionally I'll go to the local RedBox. They seem to be becoming more and more popular. The act of just getting up out of the house and going somewhere to pick up a movie can be an enjoyable experience.
     
  6. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #6
    Well...let me put it to you this way...making it all the way through the night having to get up only once to pee is a thrill!:p

    The "Wow" really hurts.:(

    I'm 68, and we bought our first TV in about 1950 or so...making me 5 or 6 at the time.

    THAT"S how old I am, sonny!:cool:

    :D ;)
     
  7. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #7
    I think he is killing your grass too.;)
     
  8. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    Feb 21, 2012
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    Behind the Lens, UK
    #8
    Well good for you! I can remember when we got our forth channel here in the UK. I was around 9. How times have changed.
     
  9. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #9
    It is kind of amazing, isn't it?!

    One generally doesn't think about it much, but when you realize the incredible rapidity of change...it's a bit breath taking.
     
  10. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    #10
    As a teenager I recall phoning girls from phone boxes. Can you imagine them doing that nowadays?
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #11
    With age comes wisdom, my friend. Or so I think. Irrespective of the rapidity of technological and indeed, social, change, I find I am enjoying myself and my life more and more the older I get. Something to do with becoming more comfortable in your skin, and all that, and taking or leaving - as you choose - what you find of interest or worthy of further investigation in the wider world.

    Oh, yes. This I remember, too.

    Actually, I remember when we got our second channel, across the small pond from you; and the amazement and inexpressible joy of travelling to the capital, and finding that different buttons allowed access to different channels.......


    It is, I agree. Astounding, in fact.....and, at times, extraordinarily impressive.

    I used phone boxes, as did almost everyone I knew at university when we were undergrads. Actually, I was still using phone boxes as a university teacher....

    I remember being stupefied at the concept of a TV remote control (once we finally actually got access to the foreign channels which might serve to culturally contaminate us), that - wow - one could be so incredibly lazy as to sit in a chair, or sofa, and not bother moving in order to switch channels. Will readily concede that I became corrupted in no time.....
     
  12. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    #12

    Heh, I still remember the phone number to the pay phone booth in the park we hung out in.

    My nephew (11 years old) recently had to do a school report on technological changes in your life by interviewing older family members. I told him about getting our first color TV in 1970, first remote control TV almost 10 years later, the VCR, 8 tracks and cassettes, cable TV, Walkman, computers, microwave ovens and cell phones. Funny watching a kid try to come to grips with this.
     
  13. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #13
    OK so here is the weirdest one. Why did old Television sets get made to look like they were wooden? Even the first consoles were that wood effect crap!

    We had a Betermax VCR with a remote (thats on a wire not IR) that you could use long before we had a TV with a remote. I remember thinking how cool it was to watch TV on the Video button, and swap channels!

    Then when we had educational videos at school the teachers never had a clue how the things worked. So funny. I don't remember any of the videos but can remember various teachers struggling to use the thing.
     
  14. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #14
    Lol, the only thing I miss is getting everything for FREE.

    Since my mom worked at Blockbuster, I NEVER had to pay for a rental, we were allowed 5 every week. I got a new game for my Game Boys and Sega Genesis every week, and I got all the Genesis games when they stopped carrying them and made way for the N64 stuff.

    Plus, the Blockbuster employee discount applied to their music store before it closed very quickly. So again, everything for like 20% off always.

    Best thing is when they forgot to add stuff to the inventory every night. Basically, whoever wanted it could take it home.

    Shameful? No, they made my mom work like a dog. Used to come home at 6AM, and needed to be back by 9AM.
     
  15. NewbieCanada macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    #15
    Um, actually the group of people who've never heard a radio show now includes pensioners.
     
  16. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
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    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #16
    But the one does not necessarily exclude the other; I know people who still listen to radio (maybe not the old style radio series that Shrink refers to, the ones which told stories, rather then were talk shows which is a different matter) for certain things, view TV for other things (granted, including TV shows), and search online or elsewhere for yet other things......
     
  17. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #17
    Here is where we pinko commie NPR guys come screaming out of the woodwork with A Prairie Home Companion. Us non-mainstream, Glee avoiding, Disney Channel bubble gum pop avoiding hipsters who prefer a book over the latest videos in Billboard's hot 100, actually may listen to... wait for it...

    A RADIO SHOW!!!

    /s

    Seriously, this is where a show like PHC, where people would love to get tickets to see one of the greatest orators of this era, actually would close their eyes, listen to it through the radio, and let their imaginations create the scenes in the stories.

    Sometimes, the simpler things are indeed better.

    BL.
     
  18. NewbieCanada macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    #18
    Yes, I was using radio show in the sense that Shrink was using it. Obviously many people far below pensionable age have listened to radio
     

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