viewing same files in windows and leopard with boot camp?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by gear71428, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. gear71428 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    #1
    Will I be able to view and use the same files in windows and leopard if I install windows using boot camp? I hope this question is clear.

    I would want to be able to use my files even if they were created in the other operating system. Will I be able to?
     
  2. Neil321 macrumors 68040

    Neil321

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    Nov 6, 2007
    Location:
    Britain, Avatar Created By Bartelby
    #2
    Depends on which format you used to install windows in bootcamp if FAT32
    yes but your limited to 4GB files transfers.If NTFS no,but you can use third
    party apps,such as MacFuse & NTFS-3G or Paragon
     
  3. gear71428 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    #3
    neil321,
    I have not installed windows yet; I am still preparing by doing research. I had planned on using FAT32. Are you suggesting that I not? Will MacFuse work with FAT32?
    thanks, gear
     
  4. Neil321 macrumors 68040

    Neil321

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    #4
    No im not suggesting you don't use FAT32 but it has it limitations plus its a old file system.MacFuse/
    paragon are programs that allows OS X to both r/w NTFS drives/partitions
     
  5. JeffTL macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    #5
    You can read, but not write, NTFS with OS X. I have been using a Lexar ExpressCard SSD in my MacBook Pro as a FAT32 interchange drive, but any flash drive should work.
     
  6. stainlessliquid macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    #6
    Fat32 is terrible, dont use it for anything unless its a little thumb drive. NTFS 3g and/or Macdrive is the way to go.

    You also cant install vista on fat32 and I wouldnt be surprised if you couldnt install XP sp2 on it.
     
  7. gear71428 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    #7
    You folks are very helpful.

    FAT32 is out.

    Use MacFuse or Macdrive for file transfers.

    Any other advise? I am concerned that after installing Vista I won't be able to get the Leopard disc to load the MAC drivers. I am using a MBP and am not sure if it will respond to touchpad right click (to find the driver files on the disc).
     
  8. Neil321 macrumors 68040

    Neil321

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    #8
    Don't forget MacFuse or paragon will allow OS X to r/w NTFS partitions/drives & Macdrive is for windows to r/w HFS+ partition/drives
     
  9. gear71428 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    #9
    So; Macdrive is a Windows program used for reading (and/or) writing files in OSX while MacFuse is a OSX program for reading (and/or) writing files in Windows.

    I may just use a thumb drive initially to move files from one side of my computer to the other but once I get tired of that I will start installing those programs.
     
  10. Mr. Zarniwoop macrumors demi-god

    Mr. Zarniwoop

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    #10
    Yes, in general. Mediafour MacDrive is commercial software ($50 USD) that allows Windows to mount and use (with full read/write access) most Mac HFS+ volumes, except RAIDs.

    Well, not quite. MacFUSE is a free implementation of the open source FUSE (Filesystem in USErspace) for Mac OS X, which provides a way for Mac to use FUSE file system drivers. By installing MacFuse, you can then use the free open source NTFS-3G for Mac OS X, which allows OS X to mount and use (with full read/write access) most Windows NTFS volumes, except compressed or encrypted files.

    There's also a higher-performance commercial alternative that doesn't use MacFUSE, Paragon NTFS for Mac OS X ($40 USD), which allows OS X to mount and use (with full read/write access) most Windows NTFS volumes, with some compressed file support.

    And don't forget, Mac OS X has built-in FAT volume support (full read/write) and also read-only NTFS volume support.
     

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