Virus Protection for New Imac

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by MacUser2014, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. MacUser2014 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2014
    #1
    I just purchased my first Mac computer (Newest generation Imac 5k Retina) and would like recommendations on what type of virus protection I should use. I have been working in IT for 20+ years and have always had Windows computers that needed virus protection (typically McAfee or Norton). The new Mac will be used primarily as a home computer (office, email, web surfing) for my wife. This will be her first experience with a Mac computer. We have the option of using Norton for free via Comcast but the current version slows my older windows computer almost to a halt. There are many free options like Avira and Avast as well as some paid versions. I'm more concerned with virus and phishing protection; also one that doesn't have too much impact on performance and automatically downloads pattern files, etc. and is easy to use. I know there are many threads on the subject but I'd appreciate what the current thinking is.
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Aneef macrumors regular

    Aneef

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    Lahore, Pakistan
    #2
    I've never experienced the need of installing an Antivirus software on OS X. And neither would I recommend you to install it either. I just keep my Firewall on and that's it.
     
  3. Mr_Brightside_@ macrumors 68020

    Mr_Brightside_@

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  4. QuantumLo0p macrumors 6502a

    QuantumLo0p

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    #5
    In this forum I prefer to phrase the question using malware rather than virus. Using the word virus, as a blanket term, will illicit all sorts of input from a mix of reality deniers and head in the sand types.
    ;)
     
  5. cynics macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    #6
    Just run Malwarebytes on occasion and you'll be golden. I've only had it find one thing since owning a Mac and it was some nonsense included with the DivX software that DivX has now removed.

    If you are going to using Windows via bootcamp or whatever I'd recommend your preferred antivirus.
     
  6. santaliqueur macrumors 6502a

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    Aug 7, 2007
    #7
    Or just people that realize there are no OS X viruses in the wild?
     
  7. Bending Pixels macrumors 65816

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    Jul 22, 2010
    #8
    Unless you frequent naughty sites or the Dark Web, you don't need virus protection
     
  8. JoeRito macrumors 6502a

    JoeRito

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    New England, USA
    #9
    Your comments are absolutely accurate. Folks get crazy when they see virus+mac! Right or wrong.
     
  9. Erdbeertorte macrumors demi-goddess

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    May 20, 2015
    #10
    I know some guy who knows EVERYTHING about all existing Mac "virii". He just fixed a brand new iMac with billions of them on it and after that he installed Windows XP instead of El Capitan for more security.

    His website looks also very nice:

    http://www.joltsystems.com

    :D:p:D:p:D:p:D:p:D:p
     
  10. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #11
    LOL

    LOL

    LOLOL!

    I have Adwaremedic and Avast to run as required, don't forget the optional containment field for ultimate protection!
     
  11. beachmusic macrumors regular

    beachmusic

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    #12
    i would suggest Avira for Mac and Malwarebytes.
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #13
    That's the difference. OS X is not Windows and operates in a different malware environment than does Windows. Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 12 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). 3rd party antivirus apps are not necessary to keep a Mac malware-free, as long as a user practices safe computing, as described in the following link.
    Read the What security steps should I take? section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ for tips on practicing safe computing.
     
  13. QuantumLo0p macrumors 6502a

    QuantumLo0p

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    #14
    My statement is holding completely accurate I see.
    :D
     
  14. santaliqueur macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    So which one was I? A "head in the sand" type or a reality denier?

    Let's be honest, you posted that so someone would correct you and you got to say "see, I'm right!"

    Using virus as a blanket term is something that people do when they don't know what they are talking about. Helping them be educated is what you should be doing, instead of saying their heads are in sand for using the wrong term.

    There are no viruses for OS X. There is obviously malware, but if someone calls malware a virus, I guess there's more opportunity for you to claim superiority over others in the future.
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #16
    Completely inaccurate. The plain fact is that there has never been a true OS X virus in the wild. Fact. Other forms of malware (such as Trojans) yes, but not a single true virus. If you care to challenge that, provide proof otherwise.
     
  16. 960design macrumors 68020

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    Destin, FL
    #17
    While I've been a Mac Adict for years, and agree that Macs are without a doubt one of the safest operating systems of all times. Most user's really have to work hard to infect their machine. Fortunately the OS is setup to halt the progression of the infection to other machines, which is why a Mac Virus is very rare.

    But the gauntlet was tossed, so I will point out two virus that have infected OSX that come to mind:

    Old School:
    OSX/Leap-A back in the day was a true floppy to floppy virus. Probably not a concern today.

    Today: (and probably on your Mac right now):
    Thunderstrike2 or a version of it.

    The good news is that virus protection software will not save you from the second type of attack. Nothing currently can. Virus protection software has the side effect of having access to root folders ( El Capitan fixed a lot of this ) and possibly being the source of any future script kiddie attacks. So, I completely agree that you should NOT install any antivirus software on your computer. Stick with a Mac OS, or Linux Based OS, or Solaris OS if you are so lucky.
     
  17. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Auckland
    #18


    The Leap-A I recall was a trojan spread by a messaging attachment that required user installation - or are you referring to something else?
     
  18. 960design macrumors 68020

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    Destin, FL
    #19
    That's the one. I was referring to the time when that was indeed the definition and most common propagation of a virus. I had hoped, "Old School," would explain the timeframe and definition at the time as well.

    Back to the trojan, Leap-A: The initial infection requires some user interaction ( old school virus, current trojan ), but once infected can pass to all systems on the local lan ( any school virus ). Fortunately, this infection was not very dangerous and very obvious as it disabled the infected applications.

    If I remember all that correctly. I'm a little sauced due to Michigan States not being able to catch and Alabama pretty much running them over. Yes, I expected it, but had hoped against the odds. No more typing, because, I will probably be incorrect and somehow slur while typing.
     
  19. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #20


    Cool - the reference to floppy threw me, thought you meant old-old-old school LOL
     
  20. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

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    Nov 28, 2014
    #21
    Lets summarize about Mac OS and "malware":

    1) There has never been a single "virus" for Mac OS (if you think otherwise then you are uninformed)

    2) There are "trojans" for all OSs (Mac, Windows, Lunux, etc.) because it's impossible to stop a user from purposely installing malware and infecting themselves (which would require multiple confirmations and an admin password on any Mac versions).

    3) Mac OS has many layers of protection built-in to the OS including XProtect, Gatekeeper, root not enabled by default, and now SIP.

    4) 99.9% of all articles on the Internet about Mac malware threats on the Web are complete and utter FUD (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear,_uncertainty_and_doubt) that are funded by companies that will benefit from your fear of malware, and lack any journalistic or factual integrity.

    4) Installing 3rd-party malware or security software on your Mac offers no benefit at all, greatly reduces performance, increases instability, and actually reduces the security of your Mac by adding potential vulnerabilities that were not present in Mac OS.
     
  21. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #22


    Pretty good summary :) most comment goes awry because peeps forget that the umbrella term is malware, of which viruses are a subset, not the other way around.
     
  22. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

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    Nov 28, 2014
    #23
    I agree completely. Any security/tech professional understands the fact that no OS is immune from "vulnerabilities" or "malware" as a generic and all-inclusive term. However, there is a very important distinction between those vulnerabilities that are real, in-the-wild, passive threats for a given OS, vs those that are only of concern where a user chooses to infect themselves on purpose.

    I know that that many will argue that "infect themselves on purpose" is not a fair statement but it's an honest statement. If you are gullible enough to fall for a Nigerian phishing email, or a vishing call from someone who can barely pronounce "Microsoft" insisting that they can detect an infection on your home computer, then there is no hope for security on any computer your own. In these cases I'd recommend an iPad to those users instead (even more impervious than Mac OS).
     
  23. 960design macrumors 68020

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    #24
    I noticed your username and had to comment:
    We indeed log these errors, pronounced as "Eye Dee Ten Tea" or written as ID10T (idiot) during our research.
     
  24. santaliqueur macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    #25
    My malware protection is: Don't type my administrator password for stuff I'm not choosing to install.

    Magically, I have not been infected with anything in 10 years.
     

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