Visual Basic - Any way around buying Windows?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by SirJ, Sep 9, 2009.

  1. SirJ macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    #1
    Hi guys

    I am currently in a class that is doing VBA programming. We haven't started actually programming yet, but will start soon.

    Unfortunately, Microsoft decided VBA wasn't necessary for mac users and I don't have it included with my Office Suite.

    Is there any way to work with VBA without installing Windows and Office again? Thanks
     
  2. MasConejos macrumors regular

    MasConejos

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #2
    I believe Crossover 8.0 supports the latest office, which at least gets you out having to deal with windows.

    If you want pure VB, the Mono project will let you do VB.net

    Aside from those two, I'm not aware of any other options
     
  3. SirJ thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    #3
    Thanks for the quick response.

    I've heard about Crossover and was looking into that a little. Is that stable/reliable enough to keep school projects on? Also, how seamlessly does that integrate with OS X?

    I've not heard of the Mono Project or VB.net. Could you (or someone else) please explain that a little?
     
  4. zippyfly macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #4
    I am not sure to what extent your class needs pure VB but if it's just a matter of following along with algorithms in VB, you might ask the instructor if REALbasic is sufficient.

    I have no experience with either (although tons of experience with 1970s and 1980s BASIC haha).

    http://www.realsoftware.com/support/portingvisualbasic.php
     
  5. Buzz Bumble Guest

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #5
    Crossover is dodgey on compatibility. I've had fairly simple Access databases that refuse to work properly with Crossover. I'd avoid Crossover completely and go for proper Windows via Boot Camp, Parallels / VMWare, or even one of the freeware / shareware products.

    On the other hand, it might be easier to buy an older version of Mac Office which does have the now-missing bit, although I have no idea how well it stacks up against the Windows version.
     
  6. MasConejos macrumors regular

    MasConejos

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #6
    Crossover is a paid offshoot of the WINE project. WINE is a windows compatibility layer for posix (mac, unix, linux) systems. Although it is not actually an emulator, it is easiest to think of it as a windows emulator. While not everything is supported, many windows programs (especially more straightforward programs) will run on it. Crossover, like I said, is a retail offshoot of WINE, where the developers have specifically tweaked it so that the most common applications run on it. The latest version is supposed to support Office 2007, although I'm not sure to what level they support VBA. Crossover has a short trial period, to test if out for free if you want, along with fairly decent support.

    The .Net Framework is Microsoft's (relatively) new programming platform for windows. It is a common library of functionality that can be used by several different languages, including Visual Basic (VB.Net) and C# (The offspring of C++ and Java having babies). So VB.Net is the Visual Basic Language in conjunction with the .Net Framework (library of common code). Microsoft actually offers a free version of the Compiler, VB Express, on their website.
    The Mono Project is an open source, Posix (Mac, Unix, Linux) implementation of .Net, and many .Net programs can run on it, even those compiled on windows machines. The final result of all of the above, is that if you install mono and write VB>Net applications on it, they will run on both Mac and Windows.

    It really depends on what the requirements of your class are.

    If it has to be VBA (the specific falvor of VB inside of Office, which is different from that of Visual Basic, which is different from that of Visual Basic.Net) then you will need office (and possibly windows).

    If you want to go as cheaply as possible, I recommend Virtual Box, which will let you run windows and is free, Windows 7 RC1, which is free and will last about 6 months before you have to buy it, and finally, you can even get a 30-40 day trial of Microsoft Office, which might last long enough to get you through your class. (If not, you can always sign up for another trial under a different email address)

    Of course you can always buy a full copy of any of the above; I'm just listing the non-obvious alternatives.
     

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