Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

PepperPad

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 8, 2020
11
0
Hello everyone,

I have just bought a new Apple TV 4k (128GB) and discovered that you can add videos (in any format) directly to the Apple TV using VLC.

Would you have other experiences of this kind without conversion or streaming?

Thanks
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
4,763
1,795
discovered that you can add videos (in any format) directly to the Apple TV using VLC.

Not sure I understand. "add videos" implies that you are storing videos on the Apple TV and playing them from there. How are you doing that?

The most common way to play your own videos is via streaming, from your Apple video library, or using Plex or Infuse to stream files from your local disk.
 

PepperPad

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 8, 2020
11
0
Remote Playback - Drag and drop file playback via VLC :

Simply navigate to the Apple TV's IP address in a web browser.

Then, drop a file, and VLC saves it to the Apple TV.

Of course, these files take up space on your Apple TV.

The file is there and ready to be played.

remoteplayback.jpeg
 
Last edited:

BaggieBoy

macrumors 6502a
May 29, 2012
610
313
UK
Since the Apple TV storage is very limited, I'm not sure how useful a feature that is. I'm happy using Infuse and pointing it a NAS where I keep all my 4K media.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
4,763
1,795
Entering the Apple TV URL in a browser didn't work - dropped connection. You have to have installed VLC on the Apple TV and have it listening for it to work.

Spent an hour or so trying to download a file. Unsuccessful as my storage was full (57GB of 59GB). As far as I can tell there is no way to figure out where the storage is being used. The largest app I have only takes ~500 Mb and adding them all up comes to less than 2 GB.

Don't understand why you want to go through all of this hassle - uploading to Apple TV, dealing with out of space problems when Apple doesn't provide you with the tools to tell where space is being used, deleting the files when you are done then starting everything all over again.

In my case downloading makes no sense since my .mkv files (if they will play - could not test) for 4K movies can run ~90 GB each so I could download 1 movie on a 128 GB Apple TV.

After several hours of work I came to the conclusion that VLC downloading to the Apple TV is way too much work. I much prefer using Plex or Infuse to browse through all of the 4K movies that I bought during the Black Friday deals.
 

PepperPad

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 8, 2020
11
0
Thanks for your reply.

I understand, it is surely not interesting for everyone....

In my case, I don't have a server and don't want to use my Mac for that.

I watch videos of up to 10GB and benefit from the 128GB of the Apple TV without any problems for the moment with several videos added.
 

Sheepish-Lord

macrumors 68000
Oct 13, 2021
1,749
3,154
I used the VLC remote playback a couple of times for mkv files but since I have the 32gb model it was a challenge to have more than one movie, if that. Then I accidentally stumbled upon QuickTime players ability to AirPlay to my ATV with perfect audio/sound as opposed to something like screen mirroring. Obvious problem was getting mkv files to mov but then I realized VLC can convert them so now I just do that instead. It renders by MacBook useless when I AirPlay but I have multiple devices so it's not a concern.

Now if I had a 128gb ATV then I would probably do the VLC remote playback.
 

PepperPad

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 8, 2020
11
0
Entering the Apple TV URL in a browser didn't work - dropped connection. You have to have installed VLC on the Apple TV and have it listening for it to work.

Spent an hour or so trying to download a file. Unsuccessful as my storage was full (57GB of 59GB). As far as I can tell there is no way to figure out where the storage is being used. The largest app I have only takes ~500 Mb and adding them all up comes to less than 2 GB.

Don't understand why you want to go through all of this hassle - uploading to Apple TV, dealing with out of space problems when Apple doesn't provide you with the tools to tell where space is being used, deleting the files when you are done then starting everything all over again.

In my case downloading makes no sense since my .mkv files (if they will play - could not test) for 4K movies can run ~90 GB each so I could download 1 movie on a 128 GB Apple TV.

After several hours of work I came to the conclusion that VLC downloading to the Apple TV is way too much work. I much prefer using Plex or Infuse to browse through all of the 4K movies that I bought during the Black Friday deals.
Infuse : $ 95 ?
 

pmiles

macrumors 6502a
Dec 12, 2013
777
649
There are several ways to view movies using the VLC player app on Apple TV. It's free but it has its downsides.

If all you want to do is click on a movie and just watch it, it does the job. Now if you are a power movie type, it's not for you, because it will not playback certain audio formats since they are licensed, nor does it give you a fancy movie synopsis or the ability to use playlists (speaking of the Apple TV app version regarding playlists).

VLC won't play DTS audio, it needs to be AC3, which means you have to re-encode (aka downgrade the audio). That's why most of the other alternatives aren't free... licensing fees. Pretty much every Blu-Ray Disc uses DTS audio and perhaps some modern DVDs.

If you're not an audiophile and don't care about snazzy menus, VLC is a respectable free player.

The ideal way to store your movies is on a media server such as a NAS, in the cloud (if you have money to burn), or on a hard drive with remote access. The Apple TV itself is a poor storage location as movies can easily eat up TBs of space.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
4,763
1,795
Infuse : $ 95 ?

VLC won't play DTS audio, it needs to be AC3, which means you have to re-encode (aka downgrade the audio). That's why most of the other alternatives aren't free... licensing fees. Pretty much every Blu-Ray Disc uses DTS audio and perhaps some modern DVDs.

So it's a tradeoff between your time, audio quality and video formats supported. Its free if you don't want all of the features.


Personally I use Plex due to its advanced (and complicated) features.
 

Longkeg

macrumors 6502a
Jul 18, 2014
555
278
The Nation’s (US) Oldest City
Would you have other experiences of this kind without conversion or streaming?
I think if you search these forums you’ll find many threads on this topic going back several years. The whole VLC, Plex, Infuse debate has been going on for years. Since you’re new to this party you may find it useful to review them. Even at 128gb the ATV was never meant to store content on board. If that works for you that’s great but the more experienced you become, and the larger your library grows, I think you’ll eventually outgrow VLC too. It’s a good starter app but eventually you’ll want to take the training wheels off.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.