VMWare Fusion - crappy performance?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by grimreaper1377, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. grimreaper1377 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    #1
    Hi,

    I installed Vista Home Premium on a bootcamp partition. When I load it up in vmware, the graphics really take a fall. Is this normal? I have to use the vista basic theme since it won't let me run aero!

    Thanks
     
  2. Mr. Zarniwoop macrumors demi-god

    Mr. Zarniwoop

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    #2
    Neither VMware Fusion or Parallels Desktop support Aero.
     
  3. steveza macrumors 68000

    steveza

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    Running virtual machines is always a compromise on performance as resources have to be shared between the host and guest OS. If you need native (best) performance from Windows use boot camp.
     
  4. toolbox macrumors 68020

    toolbox

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2007
    Location:
    Australia (WA)
    #4
    When you running it in vmware, have you assigned extra memory? Vista runs better on 1 + gb of ram.
     
  5. VideoFreek macrumors 6502

    VideoFreek

    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Location:
    Philly
    #5
    Extra memory won't help graphics performance--there is no way to get Aero to run under virtualization. The reason for this has to do with how graphics are implemented in a virtualized machine--Windows running under virtualization is NEVER allowed to access the physical graphics card directly. Instead, Windows talks to a "virtual" graphics adapter, which is actually a software layer that takes the graphics commands from Windows and translates them to something that can be integrated by the host OS (in this case OS X) into the commands that it is passing to the physical graphics card. All of this adds a tremendous amount of processing overhead, which ensures that graphics-intensive operations like games or Vista Aero won't run too well (or at all).

    VMware covers this in one of their FAQs. There, they point out that the only conceivable solution to this problem would be for graphics cards to be expressly designed to deal with two (or more) different OS's at the same time, which would allow the guest OS to directly access the hardware. No such card exists, at least commercially, today.
     

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